It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Underground anomalies found at sinkhole in St. Albans

page: 1
14

log in

join
share:

posted on Oct, 27 2015 @ 09:43 PM
link   
A micro-gravity survey of the area surrounding a sinkhole that appeared in St. Albans, has revealed that there may be larger voids or caverns three times larger than the one that appeared on the surface:

www.msn.com...

Hundreds of years ago, the site was used as a chalk mine, a lime kiln and for baking clay.




posted on Oct, 27 2015 @ 09:44 PM
link   
a reply to: stormcell

That seems reason enough to evacuate the immediate area



posted on Oct, 27 2015 @ 09:55 PM
link   
How does insurance cover something like this? it's not an act of god if those areas were chalk mined by humans?



posted on Oct, 28 2015 @ 12:47 AM
link   
I wonder if the developer or their insurance is on the hook for something like this. I know they would fight it tooth and nails but you would think some due diligence could have uncovered the past of the land and maybe prevented putting a development at the property to begin with. This has to be something very expensive to fix and prevent but hopefully a solution will present itself for the people affected.



posted on Oct, 28 2015 @ 03:16 AM
link   
Jeepers! I was just there this summer and had a lovely time.


I hope everyone's OK! Bless 'em all.


The sinkhole situation is becoming chronic and severe, worldwide.




The ground is great because it’s there. Of all the fears and uncertainties life throws at us, one thing we can always count on is the ground being exactly where it was yesterday. So when you peek out your front window one morning and see a yawning pit where you used to have a lawn—or neighbors—it can be a bit unsettling. Well, welcome to the lives of these people.


SINKHOLES



posted on Oct, 28 2015 @ 04:37 AM
link   
a reply to: hknudzkknexnt

I disagree.

It does however sound like a perfect moment to access those voids under the earth, map them, establish their true volume, and then fill that volume with rapid setting cement, or ferrocrete perhaps. That would prevent further collapse, and provide a stabilising effect on the surface area affected by any subsidence issues being caused at ground level.



posted on Oct, 28 2015 @ 10:41 AM
link   
a reply to: Tjoran
In the state of Pennsylvania in the USA there were many coal mines dug over the past 175 years, and no one really knows where all of them are. When you buy a house in the state your are offered a subsidized insurance policy incase it is located over an old mine, and it collapse.


edit on 28-10-2015 by olbe66 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 28 2015 @ 11:35 AM
link   

originally posted by: olbe66
a reply to: Tjoran
In the state of Pennsylvania in the USA there were many coal mines dug over the past 175 years, and no one really knows where all of them are. When you buy a house in the state your are offered a subsidized insurance policy incase it is located over an old mine, and it collapse.



The question is, Do they take them? and if it's for coal mine, what about these "clay" mines?



posted on Oct, 28 2015 @ 03:13 PM
link   
I think linestone and acid rain dont mix. Just creates holes



posted on Oct, 28 2015 @ 09:34 PM
link   

originally posted by: TrueBrit
a reply to: hknudzkknexnt

I disagree.

It does however sound like a perfect moment to access those voids under the earth, map them, establish their true volume, and then fill that volume with rapid setting cement, or ferrocrete perhaps. That would prevent further collapse, and provide a stabilising effect on the surface area affected by any subsidence issues being caused at ground level.


If these voids were lined with concrete and reinforced steel, they would make the ultimate basement storage area for stuff



new topics

top topics



 
14

log in

join