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Bacon causes cancer

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posted on Oct, 27 2015 @ 09:14 AM
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a reply to: MrCrow

The same report adjusts the LIFETIME cancer risk from eating processed meats at 1%, raising lifetime risk from 6 to 7%. The headlines are sensational, don't worry too much about it




posted on Oct, 27 2015 @ 09:19 AM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus
a reply to: angryhulk

My concern is ultra-minimal because the study said:

"For an individual, the risk of developing colorectal (bowel) cancer because of their consumption of processed meat remains small..."

Just like when I eat plutonium, another Group 1 item.


Your risk of developing bowel cancer (statistically) is around 4% anyway. Given that processed meat is a carcinogenic and increases that risk (for bowel cancer primarily), it is up to you if you eat it. If your concern is 'ultra-minimal' then great. I wouldn't want anybody to think they could tell me to do anything. I'll make my own decisions.

I'm not sure what your point is on eating plutonium? In fact there are documented cases on individuals ingesting plutonium. Quite bizarre stories. One of them went on to live for another 22 years if I remember correctly.



posted on Oct, 27 2015 @ 09:44 AM
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posted on Oct, 27 2015 @ 09:48 AM
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posted on Oct, 27 2015 @ 09:56 AM
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posted on Oct, 27 2015 @ 10:00 AM
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This link comes with a formal warning from me. Vegematics beware.

bbqpitboys.com...



posted on Oct, 27 2015 @ 10:47 AM
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a reply to: MrCrow

Me too...hail Bacon! P's: search thingy here has been messed up quite awhile. The Google-slash ATS questioning instead I got from members her a couple years back!
edit on 27-10-2015 by mysterioustranger because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 27 2015 @ 11:23 AM
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originally posted by: angryhulk
I'm not sure what your point is on eating plutonium? In fact there are documented cases on individuals ingesting plutonium. Quite bizarre stories. One of them went on to live for another 22 years if I remember correctly.


My point is that they classified bacon and plutonium in the same category.



posted on Oct, 27 2015 @ 01:51 PM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus

originally posted by: angryhulk
I'm not sure what your point is on eating plutonium? In fact there are documented cases on individuals ingesting plutonium. Quite bizarre stories. One of them went on to live for another 22 years if I remember correctly.


My point is that they classified bacon and plutonium in the same category.


Well they should. They are both carcinogenic to humans. That is the classification in a nutshell.



posted on Oct, 27 2015 @ 02:07 PM
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a reply to: angryhulk

I think the issue here is the rather myopic view that the agencies tracking this stuff have.

To put meat in a category thats the same as plutonium or asbestos is just insanity to people who are not looking at it from a narrow angle of "cancerous or not". In other words: the classification makes what is very gray seem to be black and white. That isn't the intention...but its the way its being presented here.



posted on Oct, 27 2015 @ 02:27 PM
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originally posted by: angryhulk
Well they should. They are both carcinogenic to humans. That is the classification in a nutshell.


On the weekend I typically whip up bacon and eggs, not radioactive isotopes and eggs.

Tiny bit of difference as far as I am concerned.



posted on Oct, 27 2015 @ 03:11 PM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

On the other hand, you can use only ingredients that would be classified as "natural". You know, arsenic, mercury, lead....

lol



posted on Oct, 27 2015 @ 03:30 PM
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originally posted by: mikell everyone dies in the end.


yes and this is the ultimate truth.



posted on Oct, 27 2015 @ 03:33 PM
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originally posted by: bigfatfurrytexan
On the other hand, you can use only ingredients that would be classified as "natural". You know, arsenic, mercury, lead....


I could put those in my omelet and I would not even need a pan to cook them in with all those heavy metals.

Nom, nom, nom. I may even save you some.



posted on Oct, 27 2015 @ 03:33 PM
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a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan

i personally believe that one's pre-disposition to getting cancer at some point is genetically encoded from birth. i think lifestyle and/or diet have a minimal influence. it's a lottery. (IMO of course)



posted on Oct, 27 2015 @ 03:41 PM
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a reply to: RoScoLaz4

You left out enviornment. My father had cancer 9 times and it was attributed to his time in the navy standing in front of a microwave range finder.



posted on Oct, 27 2015 @ 03:57 PM
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a reply to: RoScoLaz4

well....there is an awful lot at play.

Fungal infection is a really big cause of cancer. As are viral infections. For example, cervical cancer tends to be caused by a viral infection. So behavior and environment can have an effect to a very large degree.

Cancer seems to be fairly common in my family, to go along with our high incidence of autoimmune disease. We believe it is related to time spent in Kwajelein by my mom and her siblings. Potentially related to either rocket fuel from the numerous launches over the island, or radiation from Bikini Atoll a few miles away.

Of course, there are genetic adaptations that allow one to withstand these kinds of things. No argument there. But I suspect that "genetic links" will end up being environmental. For example, sharing utensils and drinks with a child between 6 and 24 months can significantly reduce that childs tooth health, depending on the flora/fauna in your own mouth. But that is just 1 way that bad teeth can "run in the family": because families tend to share everything and infect each other.



posted on Oct, 27 2015 @ 04:20 PM
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I'm veggy but drink more than enough beer to ensure that does nothing to harm my risk factor



posted on Oct, 27 2015 @ 04:31 PM
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I realise I'm straying off the topic of the bacon/red meat thing here, but cancer really scares me. I've witnessed it so much throughout my life that I'm even scared of getting checked out! Not that I have any symptoms mind you and it may just be white coat syndrome... but there you go, that's me!



posted on Oct, 27 2015 @ 04:55 PM
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Since it's coming up in this conversation I'll ignore my silly hesitance based on a fear posting it will mean I get cancer. Nobody in either of my parents families have had cancer that I can find and no matter how old they live.

Genetics must be large factor. I can't explain my families history otherwise.

I am however very likely to die too young due to heart disease, which is what has killed all men in my family. Smoking / drinking or not smoking / drinking made no difference at all in what age they passed on.

I'll continue with a natural diet for my species which includes meat.



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