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Blackhole under the sun?

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posted on Jan, 3 2005 @ 12:36 PM
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I have heard for many years that there was a possible blackhole that existed near the sun, mainly south of the sun, if looking at the solar system like a compass, looking down, is this true or high probability?




posted on Jan, 3 2005 @ 12:38 PM
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Where did you hear this? I've never head of this...and no, it's not possible, it would have been detected if it was there.



posted on Jan, 3 2005 @ 12:43 PM
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I read it thru many physics articles, articles on the possibilities of a blackhole behind or under the sun that makes certain stars that once charted, just disappeared, so the theoretical explanation was a possible blackhole, but not close enough to affect orbit of the solar system , within our galaxy...I cant remember the sites or information, but I do remember a conversation back about 3 yrs ago I was involved in with a group of people who were talking about this, I want to say lycos.com under space tab, talked about this and it was a big discussion. We dileberated on the issue for hours. But we could never find anything substantiating to support the claim. I was just wandering if there had been anything recent in the last couple of yrs that might have supported a different claim.



posted on Jan, 3 2005 @ 03:45 PM
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I think you are probably referring to the black hole in the center of the galaxy, as oposed to one near our sun. It is theorized that most, if not all galazies have a black hole at their core, but not solar systems such as ours.

hubblesite.org...


nnouncing the discovery of three black holes in three normal galaxies, astronomers suggest that nearly all galaxies may harbor super-massive black holes that once powered quasars



posted on Jan, 10 2005 @ 08:14 AM
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I suppose it depends how far 'south' you go. In an infinite universe it's highly likely that there will be many of them on this line.



posted on Jan, 21 2005 @ 11:29 PM
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I think we would of seen the sun go first, or at least plug the hole so to speak.


E_T

posted on Jan, 22 2005 @ 01:30 AM
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It wouldn't be possible. Even though it might be completely black/didn't emit any radiation gravity of object more massive than sun would cause huge disturbances to orbits of planets.



posted on Jan, 22 2005 @ 01:46 AM
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I saw her play in Regina, Sask Canada at the STATE. She didn't know too much about black holes. In fact she didn't really seem that impressed when I tried to talk to her after the show but then I was pretty wasted.



posted on Jan, 22 2005 @ 05:35 PM
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soooooooooooooo one question. why havent we been sucked up ?
oh im good



posted on Jan, 23 2005 @ 01:16 PM
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blackholes don't suck you up.

It could be that the current orbits are caused by the black hole.



posted on Jan, 23 2005 @ 01:31 PM
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Originally posted by tomcat ha
blackholes don't suck you up.


Really? Why do you think they call them blackholes?

Surf



posted on Jan, 23 2005 @ 01:42 PM
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Black holes do indeed suck you up for all practical purposes, a blackhole close enough to the sun would start feeding on the sun until it swallowed the entire sun. Even if it was not close enough to feed we would likely be able to detect the effects it would have on bodies like the sun.

We have seen blackholes feeding

www.cnn.com...



posted on Jan, 23 2005 @ 01:54 PM
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Originally posted by surfup

Originally posted by tomcat ha
blackholes don't suck you up.


Really? Why do you think they call them blackholes?

Surf


Astrophysicists are still finding out a lot of information about blackholes that was unknown several years ago.

For instance, when the gravitational pull of a black hole starts pulling in matter, this matter may revolve around the blackhole almost indefinitely, gradually increasing in speed to near the speed of light until all the sub-atomic componemts that make up matter has been shredded into quarks.

When these quarks finally become part of the accretion disk, they'll act more or less like a liquid. Black holes are really disks that rotate at near-light speeds and matter at the north and south poles are being jettisoned into space at speeds approaching lightspeed!

EDIT: Geophysicists are speculating that at the very center of the Earth and other planets may have densities approaching that of black holes. It doesn't "suck" everything in but keeps everything together.

Also, Neptune has orbital deviations that is caused by something a lot more massive that what Pluto is.

This is the reason for the search for Planet-X (10). Some theorize a brown dwarf circling the Sun and others theorize a planet that is more massive than Jupiter but can't reflect any of the Sun's light, therefore being difficult to spot.

What does this sound like to you. BTW, it's my seculation that a blackhole with the mass of Jupiter would be about 1' (one foot) in diameter, given that the mass of the Earth can be squeezed into a quarter dollar coin (U.S.).

[edit on 23/1/05 by Intelearthling]


E_T

posted on Jan, 23 2005 @ 03:33 PM
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Originally posted by ShadowXIX
Black holes do indeed suck you up for all practical purposes, a blackhole close enough to the sun would start feeding on the sun until it swallowed the entire sun. Even if it was not close enough to feed we would likely be able to detect the effects it would have on bodies like the sun.
Yeah, and matter in accretion disk heats up to huge temperatures causing it to start sending very strong electromagnetic radiation throughout whole spectrum. (up to very energetic gamma-rays)

And if it would be "silent" (without matter falling to it) its gravity would still affect to orbits of planets like second star coming into our solar system.
Disturbances in orbits of planets caused by its gravity would enable scientist to calculate its rough position, then using this position they could use gravity lens phenomena to find it.
(Neptune was found from rough position calculated using disturbances in orbits of inner planets)



Originally posted by Intelearthling
EDIT: Geophysicists are speculating that at the very center of the Earth and other planets may have densities approaching that of black holes

It isn't even close, solid material are hard to compress and there just isn't enough pressure.


At the core-mantle boundary, composition changes again. Seismic waves suggest this material is of a very high density (10-13 g/cm3), which can only correspond to a composition of metals rather than rock.
www.visionlearning.com...

Density of white dwarfs is in same class like 50% from mass of sun compressed to size of earth... or ~ million times denser than our sun. (Mean density (gm/cm^3): 1.410)
In case of neutron star density is yet again ~ million times bigger.
And in case of blackhole density is infinite.



posted on Jan, 24 2005 @ 05:05 AM
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if it were their we would all be sucked into it buy now unless it just formed


E_T

posted on Jan, 24 2005 @ 01:06 PM
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Originally posted by sexygeek
if it were their we would all be sucked into it buy now unless it just formed
Wrong, blackhole doesn't have bigger gravity than mass which formed it.
So there simply can't be mass from what it could form.
(or gravity of that mass would show)



posted on Jan, 25 2005 @ 12:55 AM
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oh okay thats something i didnt know before



posted on Jan, 25 2005 @ 01:24 AM
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Originally posted by mscbkc070904
I have heard for many years that there was a possible blackhole that existed near the sun, mainly south of the sun, if looking at the solar system like a compass, looking down, is this true or high probability?


yes, only tree days ride to the south, lol
I don't think so, we wouldn't be here if it was anywhere near



posted on Jan, 28 2005 @ 08:56 AM
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with not sucking up i ment that they suck in the literal sense. It just oulls you with its gravity. A black hole could still exist here. The current orbits can be the result of it.


E_T

posted on Jan, 28 2005 @ 01:17 PM
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Originally posted by tomcat ha
It just oulls you with its gravity. A black hole could still exist here. The current orbits can be the result of it.
How many times it has to be repeated?
Orbits of planets are "fully compliant" with results from calculations with sun as only dominating/major source of gravity. There can't be any other big mass than sun in solar system (/near it) or otherwise orbits would go totally haywire.
And just in case if you try this one next... neither there can be one in(side) sun, although there wouldn't be any difference in gravity planets of our solar system would be fried or more likely vaporized by intense radiation of its accretion disk.




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