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Arizona Tried To Illegally Import Execution Drug, Documents Show

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posted on Oct, 23 2015 @ 08:14 AM
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a reply to: Krazysh0t

The state can't be trusted for anything else so, they most certainly cannot be trusted to decide who lives or dies.

Let people defend themselves with deadly force and the question will be become moot.

As for the suspects who have been apprehended, convicted and sentenced, leave it up to the victim's families.

I don't really have a comprehensive understanding of this issue but, that much seems self-evident.




posted on Oct, 23 2015 @ 08:18 AM
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a reply to: harvestdog

In reply to this and your next post, well said and good questions. It`s a joke. It gets blown out of proportion. Even Texas doesn`t kill all the killers it catches.
It`s animals that end up on death row, I don`t know why some people defend them so much. Capitol punishment is only for heinous crimes where the animal showed no remorse for their victims. They need to speed up the process.



posted on Oct, 23 2015 @ 08:23 AM
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a reply to: harvestdog

And that's my point. Is the need to use lethal injection SO necessary that they need to go through illegal means to get it. Especially since, as you pointed out, they don't execute a lot of people anyways.



posted on Oct, 23 2015 @ 08:24 AM
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a reply to: r0xor

What you are talking about here is one of the reasons that it is cheaper to give someone life in prison than it is to execute them.



posted on Oct, 23 2015 @ 08:31 AM
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a reply to: Krazysh0t
They have over 100 poeople on Death Row, I guess they want to be prepared for when they resume the executions. They can`t do their duty legally without the drug.



posted on Oct, 23 2015 @ 09:42 AM
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a reply to: harvestdog

Then they need to use that grey matter between their ears to come up with a better solution.



posted on Oct, 23 2015 @ 09:52 AM
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originally posted by: harvestdog
a reply to: Krazysh0t
They have over 100 poeople on Death Row, I guess they want to be prepared for when they resume the executions. They can`t do their duty legally without the drug.


So .... in your opinion, it's okay for State governments to break the law so long as they think they have a good reason???

Wow, and they call me a statist.



posted on Oct, 23 2015 @ 10:00 AM
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originally posted by: Gryphon66

originally posted by: harvestdog
a reply to: Krazysh0t
They have over 100 poeople on Death Row, I guess they want to be prepared for when they resume the executions. They can`t do their duty legally without the drug.


So .... in your opinion, it's okay for State governments to break the law so long as they think they have a good reason???

Wow, and they call me a statist.


Nope. It is not my opinion that it's okay for State Governments to break the law so long as they think they have a good reason. I was guessing at Arizona's reasoning for smuggling the drug in the first place.
They have over 100 people on death row. Kind of meaningless having them their without the means to execute them.



posted on Oct, 23 2015 @ 10:00 AM
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a reply to: harvestdog

They could always just bump their sentences down to life in prison instead.



posted on Oct, 23 2015 @ 11:11 AM
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a reply to: harvestdog

Right, but they can't "do their duty" legally without the drug ... according to you.

This discussion is about blatantly illegal acts on the part of the State of Arizona.

There is no justification for these actions, just a reminder of why the Founders established a national government to keep the States in line.



posted on Oct, 23 2015 @ 11:12 AM
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a reply to: Krazysh0t
a reply to: crazyewok

I was going to share a local's perspective... but apparently us Zonies are all exactly the same and not even worthy of U.S. citizenship... it can't possibly be that the PTB in Arizona are screwing us the same way the PTB are screwing people all over the country and world... so I'll just keep it to myself.

Good to know though -- thanks for the heads up!



posted on Oct, 23 2015 @ 11:30 AM
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a reply to: harvestdog

What about the people who have been executed only to be found innocent later..been proven many times, no the govt/legal system cannot be trusted to get it right or be fair every time..23 hrs a day lockup for life will do.



posted on Oct, 23 2015 @ 12:34 PM
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a reply to: Boadicea

Please give a local's perspective.
I'll listen.



posted on Oct, 23 2015 @ 01:38 PM
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a reply to: Krazysh0t


www.slate.com... i guess they could ask so cal for what ever they are using as they have executed more people this year then most of the south combined


Texas is called the Death Belt. Harris County is the buckle.” That’s how one judge described the death penalty in the Lone Star State 15 years ago. In those days, Texas produced 40 death sentences per year, and no one blinked if Harris County accounted for 10 of them. These days, Texas is at the epicenter of a different trend: The Deep South has witnessed a sharp, sustained, and unmistakable drop in death verdicts. So far this year (as of Sept. 6, 2015) Texas has not had a single new death sentence. Neither has Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, or Virginia. While the Deep South has moved away from capital punishment, Riverside County, California, has become the buckle of a new Death Belt. It produced seven new death sentences in the first half of this year. That’s more than California’s other 57 counties combined, more than any other state, and more than the whole Deep South combined. An hour’s drive from Los Angeles, with a population of 2.3 million (6 percent of California’s population), Riverside has produced more death sentences since 2010 than any other county in America except one—Los Angeles County, which is four times its size.
so should be a short drive to az from southern California



posted on Oct, 23 2015 @ 01:49 PM
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a reply to: Boadicea

Apparently you don't read the whole thread either.

www.abovetopsecret.com...


originally posted by: Krazysh0t
a reply to: crazyewok

Yeah, I just really don't like to judge the whole for the actions of the few.



posted on Oct, 23 2015 @ 01:50 PM
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a reply to: RalagaNarHallas

If a liberal state like Cali can figure out how to do it, then I don't see why Arizona is having trouble.



posted on Oct, 23 2015 @ 01:59 PM
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a reply to: RalagaNarHallas

No California hasn't executed anyone since 2006. A Federal Judge ruled it unconstitutional in CA. They have just put a lot of people on death row.



posted on Oct, 23 2015 @ 05:23 PM
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originally posted by: harvestdog
a reply to: Boadicea

Please give a local's perspective.
I'll listen.


Well, basically, this is just another battle in the ideological war on the death penalty that's been going on for years. The battleground is Arizona (and a couple other states, Ohio and maybe Texas?) and the weapons of choice are the pharmaceuticals used in the lethal injection for executions. The pharmaceuticals who make these drugs have either stopped making them or only make them in other countries because they do not want them used for executions. The drug itself is legal; but feds are using legal loopholes and technicalities in the importation laws, as well as FDA regulations (as opposed to laws passed by congress) to stop states from getting the drugs. There have been at least a couple Supreme Court rulings regarding these drugs, and I believe the Supreme Court enjoined the FDA from stopping the importation of this particular drug (thiopental)... maybe I'm wrong about that, or maybe it was overturned, or maybe they just "found" another loophole. I'm not sure.

After pretty much this same situation arose a few years ago, Arizona switched to another drug (midazolam), which resulted in the so-called "botched" execution several months ago. I think Ohio also had a problem using the midazolam. I know someone challenged the use of the midazolam (and recently lost in the Supreme Court) because of its potential side effects, some extreme and quite painful, on the grounds of cruel and unusual punishment. Apparently Arizona tried to return to the use of thiopental after our midazolam disaster.... and this is the result.



posted on Oct, 23 2015 @ 10:09 PM
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Hey can you kick Mississippi out too? Please? We are tied of paying Federal taxes to feed and house all the criminals y'all want to save!
P.S. Im pretty sure Texas and Louisiana would like to escape also.
a reply to: crazyewok



posted on Oct, 23 2015 @ 10:11 PM
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Arizona is a beautiful state.
Some of the @ss holes in charge need to be deported to some place South of Hell.



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