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US Military plane crash in uk *Breaking* - October 2015

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posted on Oct, 21 2015 @ 11:51 AM
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a reply to: charolais

The F-18 uses the Martin-Baker MK14 seat. It was discovered in F-35 testing of the MK16 that under certain conditions, even with the NACES, and ACES II seats, during the ejection process the seat can rotate to where the chute opening becomes violent enough that it could cause fatal injuries.

It's mostly related to pilot weight and seat center of gravity. The NACES seats (Naval Aircrew Common Ejection Seat) are supposed to be rated to weights as low as 136 pounds, but depending on attitude during ejection, this is what may have happened.




posted on Oct, 21 2015 @ 11:54 AM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: SonOfThor

VMFA-232 out of Miramar. It was a C model.

The pilot reportedly ejected, but didn't survive the ejection. The first warning something was wrong was when he failed to rendezvous for the first in flight refueling point.


Most modern military fighters have seats that allows them to eject even inverted as low as 100 feet. It's my guess that the pilot landed on the crash site and perished in the fire.



posted on Oct, 21 2015 @ 11:55 AM
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a reply to: buddah6

See my post above yours. There's an issue with seats recently found.



posted on Oct, 21 2015 @ 11:58 AM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: buddah6

See my post above yours. There's an issue with seats recently found.


Sorry, I type slowly. It wasn't there when I started...I'll shut up!



posted on Oct, 21 2015 @ 12:00 PM
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a reply to: buddah6

No reason to. I suspect that you're right more than that. I only threw that out as a possibility. It sounds like he tried to wait until the last second to clear the village, and ran out of time.



posted on Oct, 21 2015 @ 03:49 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

I'm going to throw out DEC failure that caused an engine malfunction.

Was it confirmed that the Pilot had time to squawk 7700? How long was the squawk signal in play?



posted on Oct, 21 2015 @ 03:55 PM
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a reply to: projectvxn

It wasn't. The 7700 was from a Typhoon around the same time.

There has occasionally been an issue with engine failures, usually compressor stalls, on Hornets on takeoff. It could be the DEC, but the distance he got is pretty consistent with the others that crashed on takeoff with the compressor stalls.



posted on Oct, 21 2015 @ 06:57 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

I don't believe the MSL was so high and the temp low enough, I think, to cause compressor stalls AFTER take off. This is also consistent with DEC failure. If the DEC stops working it can cause a compressor stall by either flooding the HMU with too much gas, or allowing too much air thus flaming out the engine.

The DEC controls a lot of # with regard to managing fuel to air ratios. I just don't think that in the short time after take off, with full intake of air and after burn, that a lack of air took place that could cause such a catastrophic compressor stall. I believe the DECs need to be examined to positively determine the cause of the failure.


edit on pWed, 21 Oct 2015 18:58:52 -0500201521America/Chicago2015-10-21T18:58:52-05:0031vx10 by projectvxn because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 21 2015 @ 07:41 PM
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a reply to: projectvxn

A VMA-106 D model suffered a compressor stall in the left engine on takeoff in Virginia and came down. There are two types of compressor stalls that can happen during takeoff.

The first is when the compressor fails due to FOD or an external source. The engine usually shuts down and can't be recovered.

The second is when the AoA gets just that much too high. The air going through the compressor can't flow through smoothly, so it dams behind the compressor blades, until the compressor stalls. With enough altitude, and if the stall is soon enough, you can frequently get the engine running again and recover.



posted on Oct, 21 2015 @ 07:43 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

So this leaves two explanations really.

DEC or FOD. Could have been a bird strike. Who knows.



posted on Oct, 21 2015 @ 08:12 PM
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Unconfirmed, but the pilot may have been Captain Taj Sareen.



posted on Oct, 22 2015 @ 04:29 AM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: SonOfThor

VMFA-232 out of Miramar. It was a C model.

The pilot reportedly ejected, but didn't survive the ejection. The first warning something was wrong was when he failed to rendezvous for the first in flight refueling point.


Why would they have been refuelling less than five minutes after take-off? Couldn't/wouldn't that have been done on the ground?



posted on Oct, 22 2015 @ 04:32 AM
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a reply to: Araqiel

They wouldn't be. After takeoff they rendezvous with the tanker and they refuel off the coast. The first refuel point is a check to ensure all aircraft can take on fuel from the tanker, and that the tanker can transfer fuel.

He was still attempting to climb at this point. Depending on the aircraft involved, sometimes the fighters are at one base, while the tankers are at another.
edit on 10/22/2015 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 22 2015 @ 05:12 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Ah, that makes sense. The fact that it was over land was another thing I was going to query, but if it's just a check then that figures.



posted on Oct, 22 2015 @ 05:20 AM
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a reply to: Araqiel

Lakenheath has been a fighter base for as long as I can remember (right back to F111s and F4s) and Mildenhall has always been a transport and tanker base for as long as it's been used by the USAF.It's very rare to see fighters at Mildenhall and transports/tankers at Lakenheath which are within about ten miles of each other,except for emergency diversions when the other one is closed.From there it's only about 20 or so minutes flying time to the north sea where they do their refuelling (all from memory,so excuse me if it's not all that accurate!).



posted on Oct, 22 2015 @ 05:40 AM
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a reply to: projectvxn

It could have been a bird strike, there are too many bloody bird reserves in Lincolnshire!

Very sad news, thoughts go to Captain Sareen's family.



posted on Oct, 22 2015 @ 05:47 AM
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a reply to: Imagewerx

That sounds about right. First AAR is within 30-45 minutes of launch do if there is a problem it's an easy abort back.



posted on Oct, 22 2015 @ 08:20 AM
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His identity was confirmed by his sister. He was an 11 year veteran flying for the Marines.

It was also confirmed that he did eject. He waited until the aircraft was going to clear nearby homes before pulling the handles.



posted on Oct, 22 2015 @ 08:55 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

A brave brave man. Respect to his courage and presence of mind, and thanks for having the courage and ensuring that the plane crash was not a bigger tragedy by guiding it away from population.



posted on Oct, 22 2015 @ 01:43 PM
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Quick correction, it was Major Taj Sareen.



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