It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Small Tennessee school district closes, citing financial struggles, need for new income

page: 2
4
<< 1   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Oct, 19 2015 @ 09:47 PM
link   
a reply to: Reallyfolks

The article did say they had the money on hand to stay open, but that they preferred to close to figure out the budget rather than risk running into a hole.

As to their financials, counties with poor management aren't uncommon.




posted on Oct, 19 2015 @ 10:00 PM
link   

originally posted by: ketsuko
a reply to: Reallyfolks

The article did say they had the money on hand to stay open, but that they preferred to close to figure out the budget rather than risk running into a hole.

As to their financials, counties with poor management aren't uncommon.



Thought I had heard something on the news about the restraining order, had to verify. Early morning before coffee isn't the best time for me to take in information.

www.newschannel5.com...



posted on Oct, 19 2015 @ 10:43 PM
link   

originally posted by: liejunkie01
It won't last long for every other district either.

People around here are fed up with crazy property taxes, going mainly to the schools.



Agree, and it's not for teachers. Of fifteen schools, Clay County had the 2nd highest administrative costs increase while the ADA (average daily attendance) went down.


www.beacontn.org...

While total spending statewide increased by 64 percent from 2000-­‐2012, total administrative costs rose by nearly 89 percent. Inflation during this time period was only 33 percent, and thus does not account for this dramatic increase. Some of this increase is due to a seven percent increase in the number of students. Yet administrative expenditures per pupil have risen from $449.66 to $793.07—an increase of 76 percent—demonstrating that the increase in administrative spending has much less to do with increasing enrollment than other factors. In that same span of time, fifteen school systems more than doubled their per pupil administrative costs (Figure 4). These dramatic increases highlight the prioritization of non-instructional expenses as local education budgets have grown.


Clay County ..Admin costs 2000-2012 163.74% ADA increase(-16.55%) Total Admin cost increase 120.08%

edit on 19-10-2015 by StoutBroux because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 19 2015 @ 10:46 PM
link   
a reply to: greencmp

I agree with the quote, everything is taught there



posted on Oct, 25 2015 @ 01:26 AM
link   

originally posted by: greencmp
Centralized education is a bad idea. It is as simple as that, there is no good way to do a bad thing.


But decentralized education doesn't make anyone adhere to education standards. In fact it does the opposite, a subpar education is cheapest so it's in a states interest to offer it, and to then offer incentives to make the citizens of other more educated states move there to fill jobs.



posted on Oct, 25 2015 @ 09:53 AM
link   
a reply to: ketsuko
The ACA, huh?

The the same man appeared to emphasize other things than the ACA:

"I used to think the problem was about equity," Clay County Superintendent Jerry Strong said. "But it's about adequacy."

The school board in his northern Middle Tennessee county voted last week to cancel school in the rural district, saying the Clay County Commission has not provided it with a budget large enough to offset education mandates handed down by the state.

Strong said he used to be concerned that Tennessee's Basic Education Program — the state's funding formula for education — allotted more money to large school districts like Hamilton County, placing the 1,200 Clay County students at an unfair disadvantage.

"Now I see that I gain nothing from taking away from Hamilton County financially to help Clay County, because you're in the same mess, just at a different proportion," Strong said. "The funding pie is just too small."

Hamilton County, along with seven other school districts, filed a lawsuit in March claiming that BEP does not fund the true cost of education. It contends the funding formula deprives students of a free and equal education, which the Tennessee General Assembly is obligated under the Constitution to provide.
...
Strong said that in the past five years Clay County has been given more than $700,000 in recurring mandates from the state that are unfunded. In a budget of less than $10 million, that's significant, especially since the majority of the district's budget goes to payroll and state and federal mandated spending, according to Strong.

What he's talking about is The Basic Education Program of Tennessee.

Instead, you and the article are focusing on the ACA. The ACA is not the main problem... but perhaps, as he said, the single straw added to a nearly-broken back.



posted on Oct, 28 2015 @ 11:01 AM
link   

originally posted by: Aazadan

originally posted by: greencmp
Centralized education is a bad idea. It is as simple as that, there is no good way to do a bad thing.


But decentralized education doesn't make anyone adhere to education standards. In fact it does the opposite, a subpar education is cheapest so it's in a states interest to offer it, and to then offer incentives to make the citizens of other more educated states move there to fill jobs.


The standards you seek are the ones which have destroyed our children's future.

I think universal "standards" are the problem, they are nothing less than manifest lowest common denominators.



posted on Oct, 28 2015 @ 02:46 PM
link   
a reply to: greencmp

Without those standards, school districts and states can have even lower test scores than they currently do, and they have no accountability to improve it.

I don't see how saying children need to know how to do algebra leads to them not knowing how to do so.



posted on Oct, 28 2015 @ 03:16 PM
link   

originally posted by: Aazadan
a reply to: greencmp

Without those standards, school districts and states can have even lower test scores than they currently do, and they have no accountability to improve it.

I don't see how saying children need to know how to do algebra leads to them not knowing how to do so.


The inescapable result is that, without exception and by definition, the achievable standards must always be average or below average assuming there is no corruption at all and everyone is doing just the right things.



posted on Oct, 28 2015 @ 03:22 PM
link   

originally posted by: ketsuko

originally posted by: Hyperia
a reply to: ketsuko

And i remember you had issues with how things works in Sweden, embrace Socialism


Ah, irony. This is the public school system. In the United States, it is one of the few nearly 100% socialized systems we have. See how it fails?


that's alright....when their taxes go up to pay for law enforcement, court times, and prison time for those that commit crimes who weren't educated, it'll all balance out



posted on Oct, 28 2015 @ 03:27 PM
link   
school district fails, Obama's fault.....yeah, right.....but, I do have to say, that was a creative way to blame Obama.....I guess every school failure from now on, can be attributed to the ACA and Obama.



posted on Oct, 28 2015 @ 08:01 PM
link   

originally posted by: greencmp
The inescapable result is that, without exception and by definition, the achievable standards must always be average or below average assuming there is no corruption at all and everyone is doing just the right things.


Average and below average don't matter because it's all relative. In a nation of Steven Hawkings, Einsteins, and Leonardo Da'Vinci's the person with an IQ of 140 is an idiot (assuming you don't rescale IQ).

Saying students need to learn x, y, and z however doesn't lead to people not learning those things. Not holding the states feet to the fire and letting them get away with poor education practices however does. State governments are extremely powerful and have little oversight because people just don't pay attention to them. That's why Louisiana has a 67% literacy rate, why Kansas ended their school year early, and why Florida ranks worse than most nations on PISA tests.

In any standards there's going to be corruption, just look at the military where it's coming out that the military has basically been letting soldiers slide on medical and education requirements for over a decade. At every level of a bureaucracy each person lets a few things slide in order to make the numbers work for their needs. That doesn't mean that standards have no effect though.



new topics

top topics



 
4
<< 1   >>

log in

join