It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Hendricus G Loos, Master of Mind Control

page: 7
53
<< 4  5  6    8  9  10 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Oct, 21 2015 @ 08:10 PM
link   

originally posted by: dashen
a reply to: Bedlam

Neural oscillation coupled with the fact that brain waves fall bwtween the .5 to 18 Hertz range make sense


So do woodpecker taps and faucet drips, but I've never heard of mind control by woodpecker.




posted on Oct, 21 2015 @ 08:17 PM
link   
a reply to: Bedlam

Snap your fingers at 7 hz for 15 minutes.
then hop on one leg at 3 hz for 5



posted on Oct, 21 2015 @ 08:25 PM
link   
a reply to: Bedlam

The pulse waveform apparently mimics brain waves , the only thing left to prove if his idea of pulses causing nerve spiking is true.
A baseball bat is hardly subliminal



posted on Oct, 21 2015 @ 08:50 PM
link   
a reply to: jadedANDcynical

English?



posted on Oct, 21 2015 @ 09:19 PM
link   

originally posted by: dashen
A baseball bat is hardly subliminal
That was a joke.


originally posted by: Hyperia
a reply to: jadedANDcynical

English?
It's off-topic. Says something like "We have an idea to make a better artificial intelligence memory"



posted on Oct, 22 2015 @ 01:22 AM
link   
a reply to: Arbitrageur

Thank you



posted on Oct, 22 2015 @ 03:52 AM
link   

originally posted by: Bedlam

originally posted by: dashen
a reply to: Bedlam

Neural oscillation coupled with the fact that brain waves fall bwtween the .5 to 18 Hertz range make sense


So do woodpecker taps and faucet drips, but I've never heard of mind control by woodpecker.



Hi Bedlam,

This is not mind control but a similar example to what Dashen is proposing. EMDR (Eye Movement Desensitisation and Reprocessing) is now a fairly accepted method of 'shifting' stuck memories in trauma patients:


During the reprocessing phases of EMDR therapy, the client focuses on the disturbing memory in multiple brief sets of about 15–30 seconds. Simultaneously, the client focuses on the dual attention stimulus, which consists of focusing on the trauma while the clinician initiates lateral eye movement or another stimulus such as a pulsing light held in each hand, or tapping on the knees.[34] Following each set, the client is asked what associative information was elicited during the procedure. This new material usually becomes the focus of the next set or another aspect of the memory may be guided by the clinician. This process of personal association is repeated many times during the session.[34] This process continues until the client no longer feels as distressed when thinking of the target memory.


Wiki link EMDR

I'm not connecting this to Loos' patents, but rather noting that repetitive 'tapping' is often used in reprocessing distressing memories. Very, very difficult to do subliminally I'll admit, but widely used throughout the NHS - with good effects - nonetheless.



posted on Oct, 22 2015 @ 06:39 AM
link   
a reply to: beansidhe

In order to establish a physical key with knee tapping, you have to do it in such a way that it's not mistakable for something else. It's actually a trick from NLP. I prefer the shoulder squeeze.


What Dashen is wanting to be true is that you can detect something on the order of a ten-thousandth degree change caused by the light from the monitor, when you'd get a lot more sensory input from a mouse fart. Not to mention that the patent claims the data is carried by the light. However, your sense of heat delta is anything but fast. Which sort of limits your bandwidth to something worse than that of ELF data to submarines.



posted on Oct, 22 2015 @ 07:21 AM
link   
a reply to: Bedlam





In order to establish a physical key with knee tapping, you have to do it in such a way that it's not mistakable for something else. It's actually a trick from NLP. I prefer the shoulder squeeze.




Bandler would be worthy of a thread all of his very own.




What Dashen is wanting to be true is that you can detect something on the order of a ten-thousandth degree change caused by the light from the monitor, when you'd get a lot more sensory input from a mouse fart. Not to mention that the patent claims the data is carried by the light. However, your sense of heat delta is anything but fast. Which sort of limits your bandwidth to something worse than that of ELF data to submarines.


Strobing or pulsing lights, I could start to understand how an emotional state could be manipulated. Would there be any merit in re-patenting (if that's a word) purely to prevent someone else from continuing with your experiment? Almost like hoarding. Or is the patent specifically for that idea/device alone and any further developments require a new patent?

Cheers, B x



posted on Oct, 22 2015 @ 07:35 AM
link   
a reply to: beansidhe

I thought about posting a big Bandler/Grinder/Satir/Erickson thread but it's sort of going to cause an uproar especially if you toss in Gottlieb, and none of the more fun bits that I could substantiate with links.

Plus it would make some folks more paranoid. So I avoided it. But it's an interesting topic.



posted on Oct, 22 2015 @ 07:40 AM
link   
a reply to: beansidhe

As for the second part, you occasionally file preemptively to keep people away. Sometimes in big companies you file because you have to due to corporate policy. And once you file it the patent department in the company will keep it alive as long as they can stretch it out.

I've seen times I wish I had done that. The slow laser gyro rocked.



posted on Oct, 22 2015 @ 08:35 AM
link   
a reply to: Bedlam

No, go for it I would say! That would make a great thread.

The slow laser gyro sounds like the one that got away, but patent everything from now on - just in case.

It's hard to find anything much on Hendricus, such as if any one has actually used his inventions or what happened next. I'll let you know if I read anything else, Dashen.

B x



posted on Oct, 22 2015 @ 11:16 AM
link   
a reply to: Bedlam

Been doing a bunch of research and it seems that free nerve endings can indeed detect high frequency inputs

sure. The lamellar corpuscles (also known as Pacinian corpuscles) in the skin and fascia detect rapid vibrations (of about 200–300 Hz).

and I don't think the detection has to do with the Delta in temperature but rather the photons maybe touching off a reaction in the nerve endings where the potassium channels have enough energy to make thenerves spike.

That coupled with stochastic filtering which seems to allow for very fine detection of miniscule patterns we may have ourselves confirmation
Will try to post more with links tonight

edit on 22-10-2015 by dashen because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 22 2015 @ 11:45 AM
link   
a reply to: Bedlam

Post it in RATS.
Or just in a really huge private message.
To me.



posted on Oct, 22 2015 @ 12:40 PM
link   
a reply to: Bybyots

I'm not saying you're wrong, but Hendricus Loos is a Dutch name. In my country, we have old families descended from Dutch settlers named both Hendricus and Loos. Loos comes from 'Ludwig', originally, and 'Hendricus' is just a poshed-up Latinized version of 'Hendrik'. It's quite common for Germans, Flemings and Dutch to Latinize names like that.

I had a look on Google Scholar. It returns about 1,400 results, not incredible if you take citations in other people's work into account.

The results fit a profile: a mathematical physicist of some eminence, a specialist in guage theories and something called Yang-Mills fields, who is also a prolific inventor — of electronic equipment for the lab and for medical use. The patents are innocuous: here's one for an 'electric fringe field generator for manipulating nervous systems'. Turns out it's a medical device. I suppose the technology could be used for nasty purposes, but it seems a little unlikely.

I incline to think Dr Loos is a real person. He probably put his name to his daughter's autism article to help ensure publication.



posted on Oct, 22 2015 @ 12:51 PM
link   
Furthermore, I think he's kosher. Take a look at this:

Internal Holonomy Groups of Yang‐Mills Fields

Hendricus G. Loos
AFFILIATIONS
1 Douglas Advanced Research Laboratories, Huntington Beach, California
2 Department of Physics, University of California at Riverside, Riverside, California

The article has been cited 47 times since it was published in 1967.



posted on Oct, 22 2015 @ 05:02 PM
link   

originally posted by: Bedlam

What Dashen is wanting to be true is that you can detect something on the order of a ten-thousandth degree change caused by the light from the monitor, when you'd get a lot more sensory input from a mouse fart.


I call this post "nervous system manipulation by mouse farts from mice" (patent pending?)

Step 1. Photoelectric effect states that a photon, even of a low intensity can dislodge an electron from an atom of metal(Na+) or be absorbed by the atom and sends its electron into their next higher energy level.
Step 2. Nerve endings are activated by Sodium Ions(Na+) entering ion channels which cause changes in membrane polarization(nerve spiking)
Step 3. Hit enough Na+ ions with photons and you will cause a membrane depolarizationin a free nerve ending.
Step 4. Repeat. ...9 or so photons later (
).....
Step 5. Modulate the intensity of the signal that is causing the nerve spiking
Step 6. the spiking nerve(s) send signals to the brain.
Step 7. the stochastic filtering capabilities of the brain easily filter out frequencies between 1/2 Hz to 18 Hz (the same exact range as brain waves)
Step 8. you are now sending messages to the brain via the CNS using only photonic pulses.
Step 9. Profit?
edit on 22-10-2015 by dashen because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 22 2015 @ 07:12 PM
link   
a reply to: dashen
I think you're confusing metallic sodium Na with sodium ions Na+. The Na+ is already short one electron, that's what the "+" means. Metallic sodium is not the same as sodium ions.

edit on 20151022 by Arbitrageur because: clarification



posted on Oct, 22 2015 @ 07:18 PM
link   
a reply to: Arbitrageur

can a Na+ Ion absorb a photon? And if it does what happens to the ions electric charge?



posted on Oct, 22 2015 @ 07:48 PM
link   

originally posted by: dashen
a reply to: Arbitrageur

can a Na+ Ion absorb a photon? And if it does what happens to the ions electric charge?
I think it would take at least an ultraviolet photon to dislodge an electron from a sodium ion Na+ via anything like the photoelectric effect. The ionization energy for removing the second electron is over nine times higher than for ejecting the first electron, so you'd probably need a photon with more than nine times as much energy:

Sodium

Ionization energies
1st: 495.8 kJ/mol
2nd: 4562 kJ/mol


So in other words, while you can change Na to Na+ with visible light, I doubt you can change Na+ to Na++ with visible light, though I've never tried it, but those numbers show why I think it won't work. Ultraviolet light might do it but there's none of that coming from your monitor.

edit on 20151022 by Arbitrageur because: clarification



new topics

top topics



 
53
<< 4  5  6    8  9  10 >>

log in

join