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Question about a meteorite.

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posted on Oct, 18 2015 @ 05:22 AM
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I saw a meteorite tonight as I was coming out of the supermarket with my arms full of vegetables. Probably only saw the last half of its streak, the bit I say only lasted 2 seconds. I could see bits coming off it, one was bigger than the others, about a quarter of the size of the main head.

Question: if you see the light go out, does that mean it has been totally burnt up? Are there likely to be fragments of this falling to the ground?

It was my first one ever that was more than a shooting star, I am pleased. I'm in SE Australia by the way.




posted on Oct, 18 2015 @ 05:52 AM
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a reply to: Cinrad

The heat caused by entry into the atmosphere vaporizes most Meteors so I guess it depends on the size of the object , the larger it is the more chance some of it may survive and reach the surface.

They are a cool sight though if your lucky enough to see a decent one.



posted on Oct, 18 2015 @ 05:53 AM
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a reply to: Cinrad

Most meteorites are pretty dinky in size and nothing noticeable makes it to the ground. Sorry to disappoint!

One fun thing you can do (If you head somewhere that snows - does it snow in Australia?) is after a fresh snowfall, run a strong magnet over the top of the snow. You'll pick up iron filings, which are from meteorites.

A couple hundred tons of material fall to the ground each day.



posted on Oct, 18 2015 @ 05:57 AM
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a reply to: Cinrad


Are there likely to be fragments of this falling to the ground?


depends on what your definition of fragments are., you would think there would be atleast microscopic fragments left

What's Hitting Earth


Every day about 100 tons of meteoroids -- fragments of dust and gravel and sometimes even big rocks – enter the Earth's atmosphere.





posted on Oct, 18 2015 @ 06:18 AM
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a reply to: Cinrad

Technically, it is not a "meteorite" until it hits the ground.

And most meteorites are "rocky," not metallic so a metal detector is not a definitive way to find pieces. Still, it is one way to find metallic meteorites. Supposedly, some (few) people have had a tidy sum by searching the American southwest desert for metallic fragments.



posted on Oct, 18 2015 @ 07:20 AM
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once the "lights go out" it's a meteorite, and it will absolutely land somewhere. Well technically as Aliensun said it's not a meteorite until it hits the ground, but have you ever dropped something and it didn't hit the ground?



posted on Oct, 18 2015 @ 07:52 AM
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a reply to: Cinrad
I found a meteorite after a snowstorm last winter on top of my 1970 VW Bus as I was wiping off the snow. At first I thought it was a barbecue briquet but on closer inspection and the thought of how it got on the roof of the bus in a snow storm I looked into some info. I checked a couple of websites to authenticate and it passed the tests. This spring I found 2 more pieces on the size of a fist, the other two about an inch and a half long.



posted on Oct, 18 2015 @ 07:57 AM
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a reply to: ugmold

You have a literal goldmine on you!
Meteorites are very valuable, especially if the are metallic!



posted on Oct, 18 2015 @ 10:30 AM
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originally posted by: Vector99
a reply to: ugmold

You have a literal goldmine on you!
Meteorites are very valuable, especially if the are metallic!

Ok lets start this auction at...

Who's buying?



posted on Oct, 18 2015 @ 10:58 AM
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a reply to: cmdrkeenkid


One fun thing you can do (If you head somewhere that snows - does it snow in Australia?) is after a fresh snowfall, run a strong magnet over the top of the snow. You'll pick up iron filings, which are from meteorites.


You can get particles from the downspout of your house, as they wash down from your roof.



posted on Oct, 18 2015 @ 01:48 PM
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a reply to: ugmold


Who's buying?


Don't count you chondrites before they hatch !! Some aren't all that valuable, but they're all cool.



posted on Oct, 18 2015 @ 01:53 PM
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a reply to: ugmold


I found a meteorite after a snowstorm last winter on top of my 1970 VW Bus as I was wiping off the snow.


Lucky Duck !!
I found my car covered in ash from the 1980 Mt. St. Helens eruption, in Connecticut, USA.



posted on Oct, 18 2015 @ 02:24 PM
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a reply to: donktheclown

On the surface of a fresh snowfall is less likely for that to be the case.


ETA: Most downspouts nowadays are aluminum anyway.
edit on 10/18/2015 by cmdrkeenkid because: Added additional response.



posted on Oct, 18 2015 @ 05:41 PM
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I'm pretty sure I know the general area it would have landed, might put an ad in the local paper offering $100 reward, and see if anyone has found any bits and dosent know how valuable they can be.



posted on Oct, 18 2015 @ 08:11 PM
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yes....they can land spinning sparks even......Irving Texas 1996.....or bolides blow and leave an ash cloud glowing and the whole bit....it falls slowly still glowing for a minute, reminded me of charcoal briquettes..... falls from a high altitude due to not hearing the boom.....which is the test for altitude.....most say they blow by 70,000 feet.....I saw this one described in Irving about 1978.....seen from Austin to Oklahoma
the irons really separate during the sight.....10% are irons
and chondrites or rocky ones are the majority

edit on 18-10-2015 by GBP/JPY because: our new King.....He comes right after a nicely done fake one



posted on Oct, 18 2015 @ 08:50 PM
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a reply to: cmdrkeenkid


On the surface of a fresh snowfall is less likely for that to be the case.


Yes,I know, that's why I was sporting the frowning face....



posted on Oct, 19 2015 @ 04:07 PM
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a reply to: donktheclown

You know what? I completely misunderstood what you said in the first post of mine you responded to. Sorry about that!




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