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Everything is basically set up to put you in debt.

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posted on Oct, 17 2015 @ 09:48 PM
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Like I always say, if you don`t have money then you better know how to do things. Things like fixing your own car,maintaining your home, etc.
If you don`t know how to do those things you better start learning. I`ve learned how to do plumbing, electrical, carpentry,painting, auto repair,auto body work, lawn mower repair,etc because I don`t have money to pay people to do those things and I don`t want to do without those things.
new cars are way overpriced and nobody "needs" a new car.




posted on Oct, 17 2015 @ 09:56 PM
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a reply to: Tardacus

I know how to do all those things as well and I do them, but even though I make 6 figures, I live paycheck to paycheck. There is just too much debt. The mortgage payment of course, school loans that are stretched out over 25 years (another mortgage) and all the other things that I had to go into debt for to get to the point that I am right now making this kind of money. If I were a young man I'd be okay, but I'm about to turn 57.



posted on Oct, 17 2015 @ 10:09 PM
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a reply to: ChesterJohn

Ive solved the debt problem. I live it up and spend huge on everything getting as much credit as the banks will give me, and only ever paying the minimum on all credit cards and shifting balances around to stay just barely current on payments. My plan is to keep this up until im on my death bed, at which time i will declare bankruptcy and leave my creditors high and dry.



posted on Oct, 17 2015 @ 10:26 PM
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Just so everybody knows I own two older 1997 and 98 cars one with around 60k miles on it and the other around 200k I am renting right now. But buying seems like a no go unless I win the lottery ( but I don't play the lottery). I do all my own house repairs i.e. plumbing, electrical, car repairs. I have a 1995 riding lawn tractor I have been keeping alive or it would take me a week with a push mower to mow the lawn(24,000 sq feet easy).

I am working my butt off as a surgical Instrument tech, and doing some historical home repair for a few wealthy that I know.

I don't want to go into debt. I only put around 500 at a time on a credit card then I pay it off ASAP every payday I pay into it until it is gone.

But it is discouraging to want to buy a house, car or just about anything as it just puts such a stressful burden on you for so long.

We need to find a way around the current system.



posted on Oct, 17 2015 @ 10:45 PM
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a reply to: ChesterJohn

Buy the very smallest and cheapest house you can afford, and which allows you to live comfortably. Sell as often as possible and move up the ladder. If you can make smart choices that appreciate in value and use a lawyer to save on the scam of realtors, you'll work your way up the housing market.



posted on Oct, 17 2015 @ 11:12 PM
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a reply to: wtbengineer

I live in the uk, and here unemployment can last the whole of your life from when you leave school, even if you have never worked a day in your life you can still get a state pension so its more than possible.

Im claiming sick benefits at the moment and could do so the rest of my life if i chose to, its called playing the system and lying. And i get paid 2/3 of what i used to earn per week, and none of that has to go on rent or tax, so that saves a lot of money. I only have to buy electric and food per week out of the money given, and for a singal bloke with no kids that saves a lot of money too.



posted on Oct, 17 2015 @ 11:13 PM
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It's how the system is set up. The debt system keeps "slavery to the bankers" alive.



How about a washer or dryer Can I buy one for cash anywhere and get a wholesale price if I pay cash. NO!


Not full price not new for most due to prices.
Cut corners instead of piling up on debt:

Thrift stores: If you don't mind an older washer: for Thrift store shoppers. Fill up a rewards card(such as a 10 dollar purchase stamp). When filled with let's say $20.00 make a purchase.

Rental Stores: Returned/used merchandise: A new used recliner chair run about 50 bucks better condition than in a thrift store

Title Loan company car repos: cheap cars that run but may be a little older: Make a sensible bid.

Homes and vehicles other: Foreclosures bidding/ Tax sales(don't pay for a list online or other look it up yourself-same info)



posted on Oct, 17 2015 @ 11:17 PM
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a reply to: ChesterJohn
It sounds like you need to sit down and make out a written budget---for a month, a year, and at least for five years.
The initial work to put together such a document is the hardest part for most people because of the time required to figure out exactly where the money is going. Not to say that prioritizing spending is easy. But it must be done. (I tell my Congresscritters this on a regular basis but they seem not to be properly bothered by debt.)
I learned the debt lesson early in life and if there is anything I have to thank my ex-husband for, it is that lesson. When he took off leaving me holding all the credit card debt, the mortgage and a car payment, I learned quickly.
In order to get out of debt and stay out, budgeting and sticking to the budget must become a habit. If you don't learn to control your money, it will control you.
It works. I've seen people dig themselves out of some pretty deep holes when they had a dream and came up with a plan to make that dream come true.
Your first task is to make the plan for having what you're dreaming of---a house. Sit down and seriously study your finances and ask yourself what you would be willing to live without for a period of time in order to have that house. If you're married with a family, it should be a family decision/plan.
There are cash deals to be had but it takes some shopping around to find them. Don't expect to find any at a big box store.
I'm in agreement with several previous posters on the issue of a new car. To me it's like tossing several thousand dollars out onto the parking lot when you drive it off the lot. If you are incredibly rich, that's not a big deal but to most of us, it might be several months of paychecks.
Treat those credit cards like deadly vipers. They are dangerous.
My personal hero in the world of debt-free living teachers is Dave Ramsey. His way has worked for me and for everyone I've observed following his teaching. But there are lots of folks out there handing out advice so I'd say your first move would be to find someone to teach you the way of budgeting and following a budget.
It can be a struggle but the rewards are worth the sacrifices when you look at your home and can say, "It's ours!"
Best of luck, I'm wishing you well.



posted on Oct, 17 2015 @ 11:35 PM
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First off I will admit I am no financial guru in fact I'm a moron, my wife on the other hand is amazing and we'll she could of done much better than me lol.

With that being said, ways to keep debt down.

Don't buy stuff you don't need. Save money when you can, I am blatantly lower middle class and we do have debt. But it is manageable.

We currently owe on my wife's car, our house, my wife's student loans and a maybe a couple grand on a credit card or two.

To be honest we could pay off all of our debt (house not included ) today if we were inclined.

How you may ask, simply put we saved money we cut cornered we limited our waste money. We don't have cable, we have the bare bones Internet package we don't upgrade our cell phones until they no longer work. Our computers are 5 years old or older. We don't keep up with the Jones*s if you will.

When we need to buy something we shop around and coupon as much as possible (not the crazy people you see on TV though)

When buying a new car you should almost never pay more than invoice less rebates (iI sold cars for a while, if they will not do this and show you the invoice move on, another dealer will) when buying used know what you have to have and get it, know the value of the car you are purchasing and know what you have to have out of your trade.

The problem with most people is they buy stuff they don't need, with money they don't have all to keep up appearances.

Simply put if you can live without it don't buy it, I know it's a hard thing to do and it's hard on your kids too not to have the newest and nicest toy out there but you learn to understand that it's better to never need for anything bit to sometimes want for something.



posted on Oct, 17 2015 @ 11:48 PM
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a reply to: diggindirtI live in a budget everyday. I am currently not in any debt over a few weeks time. I have $360 in savings in just three months, and $100 in my checking.

I have three kids ages 7, 10 and 16, Happily married for over 18 years. We have a house overseas but only came back because of a medical condition of my son. It is genetic and he can only get his therapy here.

Anyway, now I am looking to secure things for my families future. and it is bleak and probably has been this way for decades for many and I am only now getting a good look at how this system really works. And it isn't a good one.

We are down to earth and live very simply compared to many Americans.


edit on 17-10-2015 by ChesterJohn because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 18 2015 @ 12:02 AM
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a reply to: ChesterJohn

You are absolutely correct. All bullcrap aside, i know a guy who can help. Its not a quick fix by any means, but it can get you out of their corrupt system. Message me if you want in.
edit on 18-10-2015 by HAZE3 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 18 2015 @ 12:04 AM
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You are right. We are just slaves.



posted on Oct, 18 2015 @ 12:10 AM
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oops!


edit on 18-10-2015 by ChesterJohn because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 18 2015 @ 12:38 AM
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a reply to: ChesterJohn

I gotchya. I sent you a message



posted on Oct, 18 2015 @ 01:15 AM
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Cash transactions between private parties is good way to avoid going into debt. and to live within your means. Unfortunately as people try and free themselves from debt in this way, the banks are now using the "law" to harass people who want to withdraw their cash to make cash purchases over a 1,000, in some cases even less then that. They also report you if you make cash deposits claiming it's to prevent money laundering.

The thing is WHAT exactly is money laundering ? If I go out and paint someone's house for a $1,000 and get paid in cash and then go and deposit that money in the bank so I can pay my rent and utilities with checks, is it right for the bank to report me for possible "suspicious" behavior ? If I have paid taxes and insurance on my work truck, paid taxes on gas to drive it to work, my work supplies, etc. have I done something morally wrong by basically working "under the table" if I don't report that income ?

I have really mixed feelings about this, what do others here think ?



posted on Oct, 18 2015 @ 01:24 AM
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a reply to: MountainLaurel

Buy a debit cash card at Walmart then transfer money to your bank, purchase goods, or pay bills from it.



posted on Oct, 18 2015 @ 03:26 AM
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originally posted by: diggindirt

It sounds like you need to sit down and make out a written budget---for a month, a year, and at least for five years.
The initial work to put together such a document is the hardest part for most people because of the time required to figure out exactly where the money is going. Not to say that prioritizing spending is easy. But it must be done. (I tell my Congresscritters this on a regular basis but they seem not to be properly bothered by debt.)
I learned the debt lesson early in life and if there is anything I have to thank my ex-husband for, it is that lesson. When he took off leaving me holding all the credit card debt, the mortgage and a car payment, I learned quickly.
In order to get out of debt and stay out, budgeting and sticking to the budget must become a habit. If you don't learn to control your money, it will control you.


Couldn't have put it better!! especially the bolded bit

I wish budgeting was on the school curriculum





It works. I've seen people dig themselves out of some pretty deep holes when they had a dream and came up with a plan to make that dream come true.
Your first task is to make the plan for having what you're dreaming of---a house. Sit down and seriously study your finances and ask yourself what you would be willing to live without for a period of time in order to have that house. If you're married with a family, it should be a family decision/plan.

I'm in agreement with several previous posters on the issue of a new car. To me it's like tossing several thousand dollars out onto the parking lot when you drive it off the lot. If you are incredibly rich, that's not a big deal but to most of us, it might be several months of paychecks.
Treat those credit cards like deadly vipers. They are dangerous.


On the bolded bit ... Not only are they dangerous but they end up being

more expensive than the original price, so you end up paying MORE!!




It can be a struggle but the rewards are worth the sacrifices when you look at your home and can say, "It's ours!"
Best of luck, I'm wishing you well.


Like many things in life ... you value most what has cost you most in blood

sweat and tears.





Reply to Atsbhct
WAY TO GO ....



posted on Oct, 18 2015 @ 03:52 AM
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originally posted by: crimsongod21
The problem with most people is they buy stuff they don't need, with money they don't have all to keep up appearances.

Simply put if you can live without it don't buy it, I know it's a hard thing to do and it's hard on your kids too not to have the newest and nicest toy out there but you learn to understand that it's better to never need for anything bit to sometimes want for something.



Whilst I agree with your whole post, its ^^^^ bit which sums it up perfectly

and its never too early for children to learn that particular lesson. It is my

opinion that children these days are rather spoiled ... and will benefit from not

having everything they want

That takes me back to what I am always saying .... *WANTS* versus *NEEDS*

eg.

"Do you want it?" >>>> Hmmn well yes ....

"Do you need it?" >>>> No


I think some parents equate buying to loving



posted on Oct, 18 2015 @ 05:35 AM
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a reply to: ChesterJohn

People put themselves in debt. The advertising is a seductress and you are the fool who falls for it.

If you take out loans, etc, yes you are in debt and you are paying huge amounts of interest because you could not be bothered to wait and be patient, saving the money.

Frankly, I would rather starve (and nearly have done) than get any kind of credit EVER again. That is how hard you have to be on yourselves if you want to stop this awful usury. It only exists because YOU use it and you consent to it.



posted on Oct, 18 2015 @ 06:08 AM
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I am lost with these arguments as per the OP.

Let's take a house.

Most people cannot afford to buy a house, so the option is to stay in the family home, sleep in bus shelters, rent or buy.

If you take the latter option, the only way to buy is to take a mortgage or loan. You are then in debt for sure, but it's a decreasing debt with a house/asset at the end. The house then becomes an asset which you can do with as you see fit. If you remove arrangements like this, then no one would ever buy houses.

Personally, I am in debt because I have a mortgage, but I don't see it as a debt per se. I have made a choice.

People have choices. If they don't want to have debts then that's a choice. If you want to buy a house then that's a choice. If you want to live with your parents, or rent, then that's a choice. It's a mugs game to buy on credit, but it's also a choice.



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