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Why doesn't your brain sleep?

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posted on Oct, 18 2015 @ 04:23 AM
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The brain of a dolphin sleeps one hemisphere at a time otherwise the dolphin would drown.




posted on Oct, 18 2015 @ 07:50 AM
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a reply to: chr0naut

Personal experience, obviously.



posted on Oct, 18 2015 @ 08:54 AM
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a reply to: Astyanax

Lol... Just make it up as we go along.. Yeah that's a good idea.

Anyone with any factual info? Would be nice.



edit on 18-10-2015 by DigitalResonance because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 18 2015 @ 09:07 AM
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originally posted by: Briles1207

, how can you rest your mind truly?




get blotto & pass out
get hypnotized
do various Yoga poses & Meditate

volunteer for an electro-shock session, any of those options will take your 'practical' life brain activity 'off line'



posted on Oct, 18 2015 @ 09:09 AM
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I'm still trying to work out why we sleep.
edit on 18-10-2015 by zazzafrazz because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 18 2015 @ 12:32 PM
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originally posted by: zazzafrazz
I'm still trying to work out why we sleep.


I think that sleep is power saving mode whilst we wait for light☺



posted on Oct, 18 2015 @ 01:57 PM
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originally posted by: Astyanax
a reply to: chr0naut


Our brains, unlike the rest of our body tissues, have no lymphatic vessels

Not true. They were just so hard to find that they evaded anamotical investigation for hundreds of years.


In searching for T-cell gateways into and out of the meninges, we discovered functional lymphatic vessels lining the dural sinuses. These structures express all of the molecular hallmarks of lymphatic endothelial cells, are able to carry both fluid and immune cells from the cerebrospinal fluid, and are connected to the deep cervical lymph nodes. The unique location of these vessels may have impeded their discovery to date, thereby contributing to the long-held concept of the absence of lymphatic vasculature in the central nervous system.


I'm afraid the theory you put forward was a speculative way to explain dreaming. It's most probably false.


Additionally, the condition of Hydrocephalus and studies in animals have shown that raising the pressure in CSF does not immediately flow into the lymphatic system but takes some time before the pressure is raised there. This would indicate that the link between the CSF and lymphatic systems is, most likely, less direct than having lymphatic vessels within the brain structure.



posted on Oct, 18 2015 @ 02:24 PM
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originally posted by: zazzafrazz
I'm still trying to work out why we sleep.


Because we get tired.


But seriously, I believe that sleep, and especially dreaming, are indicative of data reductive and associative processes.

If you consider that during the day you may have witnessed a car crash, at night that unprocessed sensory data is reviewed and rather than the visual data of the cars, symbols are applied and so the image of the cars can be reduced down to a general 'car' object and this then can be 'painted' with metadata like color, make, model, unusual markings or accessories. This vastly reduces the data required to store the event and also allows for association with other 'car' objects for understandings of how they may move and interact with each other and with ourselves. This associative information also allows us to redefine the car object model too.

This may also explain why after seeing a crash, while we may be able to 'recall' the crash, some of those details like car color, make or model, may be lost in the data reduction process (especially if our brain found no significance in storing that particular metadata).

A classic example is observed when asking people to describe their wristwatch without looking at it. They probably look at it several times a day but as it has been reduced to a 'watch object' mentally, we really don't 'see' it fully when we look at it. We only collect metadata about the 'object'. If you are wearing a wristwatch now, without looking at it, form a mental image of it in your mind. Then have a look at the watch and see what you may have missed out (scratches, colors and and other details).



posted on Oct, 18 2015 @ 02:26 PM
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The brain is still used for many different body functions while the body is sleeping. If the brain went to sleep, you'd stop breathing and die.

Simple science, really.

At night, there is an absence of stimuli to the brain so your subconscious starts to drift and fill in the blanks. That's all dreaming is really.



posted on Oct, 18 2015 @ 04:27 PM
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a reply to: babybunnies

Yes and no.

Yes, your brain is still active while we sleep (it is after all the melatonin that helps put us in a sleep state in the first place) performing the innumerable physiological maintenance functions that lowerbrain stem nuclei (collections of neurons) have evolved to deal with i.e. digestion, hormonal processes, cardio-pulmonary functioning, immune functioning: the brain is deeply involved in coordinating these activities, especially whilst we sleep.

It's also true that dreaming occurs in the absence of stimuli; however, what appears IS important for the organism that is dreaming, as much of what an awake human does - in terms of it's relating and meaning-making with other people - can be downright unhealthy.

Dreaming, as I wrote in an earlier post, is a way to "depotentiate" (literally, release a certain energetic build up in particular neural complexes) those emotions which we unwisely dissociate during our waking hours. Being able to think and "work with" what we feel is a way of "spreading out" the energies generated by powerful (and negative) emotional experiences. Being able to know, and contextualize, and place what is felt within a linear, serial form of processing (i.e in the left hemisphere) actually helps to equilibrate neurological hemispheric functioning.

Dreaming is there to release what we felt, either during the day, or feelings which have persisted for a longer time (such as early life traumas) so that the brain (and body) can return to a healthier state of homeostasis.



posted on Oct, 18 2015 @ 04:48 PM
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a reply to: chr0naut

You're actually describing HOW, and not WHY, we dream.

I agree with your explanation for how the details of the objects we interact with our "sterotyped" in the brain when we sleep. It is "reduced" in the sense that only particular focal properties (shape, color) are transferred from the hippocampus (where working memory occurs) to more distal temporal memory regions.

However, the process of dreaming is eminently sensible. The images perceived very often have some sort of emotional significance to us; even though they co-occur in a "soup" of other images that seem random.

Point is, most dreams perform a "cleansing" in the brain; which simultaneously, for the experiencing subject, also has to do with the various meanings that emotional experiences create 'for' us.




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