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Unlocking Your Inner Hero

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posted on Oct, 16 2015 @ 08:18 PM
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Everyone has a conception of their perfect self.

We all have an inner idea of our actualized identity.

And whether that involves becoming a race-car driving, mountain climbing, bungee jumping, white-water rafting, expedition-leading lunatic--or whether that entails an existence far more tame--within the confines of your imagination exists an image of how you'd like to be.

The movie Fight Club encompasses perfectly this idea, with the narrator of the movie

(***SPOILER ALERT***)

creating the alter-ego of Tyler Durden as a method towards remaking himself in accordance with his imagined envisionment of his ideal self. "I look like you want to look, I talk like you want to talk, I f*** like you want to f***," Durden says at one point to the narrator.

And with this concept we should all relate, for within the private confines of our imagination we exist as a character that oftentimes acts and talks far differently than the individual conception of self you currently portray to the world. Within our minds we typically always say the right thing, do the right thing, take the big chances, and act always as the hero in our own personal story.

Yet in reality we rarely live up to this idealized conception of self. And that's a massive disappointment, because almost always--the only thing keeping us from acting like the hero-version of ourselves we see in our minds is ourself.

We're the only ones holding us back. We're the only ones throttling out actions and modulating our responses.

So we're the only ones preventing us from becoming the amazing versions of ourselves we all picture within the confines of our heads.

Recognize this truth and you realize something important. Comprehend this limitation and you stand on the brink of a true psychological breakthrough.

For once you recognize you're the only one keeping yourself from acting like that idealized conception of self that exists within your imagination, once you realize that nothing substantial or concrete is keeping you from becoming the hero of your own story--you begin seeing that invisible membrane that exists separating you from true satisfaction.

Then once you identify that ethereal barrier and comprehend it doesn't truly exist, you can begin testing its limits. And you can start pushing through it in subtle but real ways.

And it starts like this: the next time you have a fantasy run through your head of how you'd like to behave or what you'd like to say, instead of letting it escape and failing act upon it--just do it.

Stand up to the bully. Go talk to the girl. Help the homeless man stranded on the street or rescue the person whose car broke down in traffic.

Get out there into the world and start behaving like the hero you always wanted be, and you'll soon find acting on those impulses towards greatness becoming easier and easier. Then where once you hesitated and vacillated and stammered and stuttered before growing brave enough where you had the courage to act, soon you'll start being the hero automatically.

Soon you'll start doing good things on second nature. Then you'll realize something even more fantastic, something you never considered possible: All along we spend our lives waiting for the appearance of some external force to save us from catastrophe, calamity, ill fate and misfortune.

But after you unlock your inner hero through simply acting on those impulses towards achieving an ideal state, no longer will you stand around doing nothing waiting for someone else to save the day--because you'll learn what already you should've known:

You become self-actualized the instant you decide to start acting upon those highest expressions of self.

Then, then--you'll know for truth: The real hero of this story is none other than yourself.




posted on Oct, 16 2015 @ 09:01 PM
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There's an idyllic paradigm concerning the optimum functioning of all persons. Consisting of diet, meditation and exercise. Find out more @ google.com!
edit on 16-10-2015 by Blissful because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 16 2015 @ 10:52 PM
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a reply to: Trachel

So you think it's possible to be the person you want to be without putting up with the person you don't want to be?

Naive. You can never have the good without the bad. The only escape is to have neither. Buddhist enlightenment or death. Frankly, both seem equally unplatable to me.



posted on Oct, 17 2015 @ 03:00 AM
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Yes a good focus to have, but remember you are only changing the way you work in the world. First main point, get to know your real self. In a way what you mean is like this clip from the movie, but must be done withouth the pills. The real self has no need for them smarties. As you will see those smarties make you very dummy!
a reply to: Trachel



posted on Oct, 17 2015 @ 03:08 AM
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a reply to: Trachel

What makes you think that everyone wants to or should become a "hero" as you put it?

Is it that unless we become all dynamic and do life threatening stunts we are not living out our potential?

I have another take on this. I don't do stupid life threatening things like a lemming. I approach life with caution and care. I've no wish to become anything other than my humble self.

Don't presume we all want to become Tom Cruise action hero or even that it is something desirable.



There is even a conspiracy about lemmings. Did Disney and the other film crews push them? The moral is just because people do it does not mean it is the right thing to do. It seems alien to my reasoning to put myself at risk for the sake of my ego and a silly hero stereotype.


edit on 17-10-2015 by Revolution9 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 17 2015 @ 03:13 AM
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There is another option to have the good with the bad and love it! Three is the magic number, also buddhist enlightment doenst exist.a reply to: Astyanax



posted on Oct, 17 2015 @ 08:48 AM
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a reply to: ancientthunder

How do you know Buddhist enlightenment doesn't exist?



posted on Oct, 17 2015 @ 09:31 AM
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originally posted by: Astyanax
a reply to: ancientthunder

How do you know Buddhist enlightenment doesn't exist?

Can you state what 'Buddhist enlightenment' is? What is your definition?

Buddhist enlightenment or death. Frankly, both seem equally unpalatable to me.

Of course 'death' feels unpalatable to you - but why does 'Buddhist enlightenment' seem unpalatable? Is there any difference between the death of the individual and 'enlightenment'?

edit on 17-10-2015 by Itisnowagain because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 17 2015 @ 10:13 AM
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Buddhist enlightment is best considered a path, a direction. As for its existence,it could only really exist in the mind as a potential in the mind of one who has been introduced to it. Eventually it becomes a realization,(in some cases) and a realization doesnt really exist. One can only realize the truth! The truth is not reliant on the existence of the truth. It simply just is! Therefore buddhist enlightment does not exist, it's a concept alone. In fact the main, deliverer of what we call Buddhist enlightment, wasnt even a buddhist. His only signiture was (I'm awake.") That is how I know it doesnt exist! Deduction, meditation and dedication have been of aid in the rediscovery. a reply to: Astyanax


edit on 17-10-2015 by ancientthunder because: missing point

edit on 17-10-2015 by ancientthunder because: misspell



posted on Oct, 17 2015 @ 10:26 AM
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Early Christians lived The Way too and true christianity was gnosis and spiritual teachings, understandings and tools.

In fact, am sure that many of them, as I , see outer religion, authoritarian instructions, accumulation of wealth in temples, abuse of power rather than empowering all, pyramidal structures, to be idolatry, and they honored the god within all, the temple of god being the human, and you don't abuse god's vessels or dominate, bully, enslave them in any way. That the way back home is an inner spiritual journey, and you shine/share the goodness you learn without forcing.
edit on 17-10-2015 by Unity_99 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 17 2015 @ 11:39 AM
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a reply to: Trachel



  1. fight club critisises society not the individual
  2. not many people dream to help the homeless
  3. an idealised self-image is the problem, not the solution

In this case accepting ones own flaws does more good than constantly overstepping ones individualistic boundries. Doesn't mean pushing ones self further is wrong just that it will almost always end in frustration.



posted on Oct, 17 2015 @ 12:15 PM
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a reply to: Trachel

If I act like a billionaire do I become one?



posted on Oct, 17 2015 @ 12:18 PM
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a reply to: LesMisanthrope

Lol go try it come back and tell us if it worked



posted on Oct, 17 2015 @ 12:34 PM
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Becoming far better than any comic book hero is very much possible with the right tools, and keys to unlock our true potential, use 100% of the energy within each and every atom to accomplish ones wishes. Meditation may aid in this process, or if your into more material science biotechnology may be a good route, then there is the promise of nanotechnology. Reguardless true power comes from within the atoms themselves the power of the entire universe is within each and every one of us.


edit on 17-10-2015 by FormOfTheLord because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 17 2015 @ 01:47 PM
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a reply to: Trachel
Going back to your original post, I feel you have a great hero within. One with a great potential to evoke deep responses, Hero contais eros which

Eros refers to “intimate love” or romantic love;

So in a way your Hero is very personal, and I feel you are very personal. You seem to deliver subjects in a very intimate way and contrary to what some may think. This is a quality, at least in the field of Phylosophy

The Ancient Greek word φιλοσοφία (philosophia) was probably coined by Pythagoras[4] and literally means "love of wisdom" or "friend of wisdom
which in these times is not so easily stumbled upon. So what I am really trying to say, is that your Hero may very well be Agape in disguise of Eros, but of course I can not be sure. Agape

translated as "love: the highest form of love, especially brotherly love, charity; the love of God for man and of man for God."
Either way,and in which ever way one describes it. Its a fun ride"!




posted on Oct, 17 2015 @ 06:51 PM
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a reply to: Peeple




fight club critisises society not the individual


It was the individual who had multiple personality disorder and liked the pain from fighting. Society did not like the fighting and violence, that's why it was an underground club.

It was the individual that was planning to do messed up things to the city.

(I'm not saying that individuality is evil, just showing that it was the individuals, not the society who was behaving destructively in the movie.)

Relating this to the topic, when individuals think only about themselves and not how it affects everyone, then society/other people get hurt (whether intentionally or not).

"The Hero" has a greater awareness, keeping in mind how others are affected and acts with compassion in all actions.


edit on 17-10-2015 by arpgme because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 18 2015 @ 01:26 AM
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a reply to: ancientthunder


Therefore buddhist enlightment does not exist, it's a concept alone.

If something exists as a concept, it exists. Are you proposing the kindergarten objection that only material objects have existence?



posted on Oct, 18 2015 @ 01:49 AM
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a reply to: Astyanax


If something exists as a concept, it exists. Are you proposing the kindergarten objection that only material objects have existence?
This type of exists that you speak of, only exist in the mind as a thought.In comparison to death in your original reply. Death on the other hand seems to hold a more defined role in Human life .

The word "existence" comes from the Latin word exsistere meaning "to appear", "to arise", "to become", or "to be", but literally, it means "to stand out" (ex- being the Latin prefix for "out" added to the causative of the verb stare, meaning "to stand").[5]
So if one would like to difine existence as an idea,then Donald duck and Popeye can also be included. There is one understanding of the word.
On the other hand we have the word Buddhism along with its own refined body of knowledge with regard to existence and enlightment. From that level of perception, enlightment does not exist it is merely a finger that points in a direction away from samsara. From there on I am fairly sure you are aware of what I mean.


edit on 18-10-2015 by ancientthunder because: missing point



posted on Oct, 18 2015 @ 04:12 AM
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originally posted by: Astyanax
a reply to: ancientthunder


Therefore buddhist enlightment does not exist, it's a concept alone.

If something exists as a concept, it exists.

Words exist - but what do those words (buddhist enlightenment) mean to you?



posted on Oct, 18 2015 @ 10:57 PM
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Enlightenment, in Buddhism, has only one meaning.

It is the full internalization of the insight that suffering is produced by thwarted desire, which in turn is produced by attachment.

The trouble with it is that it gets rid of the pleasure of life along with the pain.


edit on 18/10/15 by Astyanax because: it is what it is.



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