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Mountain Oil?

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posted on Oct, 16 2015 @ 08:20 AM
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Alternative archaeologist Heather Lynn was on the radio last night with Noory. During the conversation there was mentioned a substance known as "mountain oil", as distinct from other forms of petroleum. It seemed to be mentioned in connection with some of the oil company interest in ancient sites, though she claimed to have been told that they were mining this oil primarily for pharmaceutical uses. She also claimed a similar substance was spoken of in some ancient texts, Sumerian I believe, and that it had a spiritual value to them. I found this book tease article with a web search. Here's a snippet:


In the Sumerian records, there are many mentions of oils and their uses. Cedar oils, vegetable oils, even bitumen was regularly referenced. However, there is one very special oil that was used in an important ritual. It translates simply to “mountain oil.” Could this “mountain oil” be “rock oil” or petroleum? I have spent countless hours combing over Sumerian records, searching for clues to human origins and a better understanding of the power structures that have come to dominate our world. In my personal reading of the Sumerian tablets, I have found more to support that the Sumerian god’s were interested in this mountain oil more than even gold. In fact, I have found very little to support that gold was of special interest to the gods. Mountain oil, on the other hand…

I have traced this particular mountain oil to the Zagros Mountain range, homeland of Enil, Inanna, and other key figures in Sumerian mythology. This oil was used in a strange, yet familiar, ritual to honor Inanna, the daughter of Nanna and Ningal, who is also associated with Venus. Nanna, her father, son of Enlil and Ninlil, later became identified with Assyrian moon god Su'en/Sîn, whose name meant "illuminator." His worship center was Ur, whose name literally meant the dwelling place of Nanna. Now, I will not go too deeply into familial connections in this post but in Land of the Watchers, I do go into more detail and provide clear infographics to simplify the drama of the Sumerian gods. For now, the takeaway is that the oil from the mountain home of the Sumerian creator gods was important to their rituals and civil structure.


What do you think, ATS? Has anyone heard of such a thing? She seemed to refer to it as some distinct form of petroleum. What is this "mountain oil"? What is it's scientific value, this snake oil? Is there any, or is the story about snake oil just more snake oil? I haven't encountered it previously in my studies. Mineral oil, maybe?

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posted on Oct, 16 2015 @ 10:40 AM
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a reply to: TheBadCabbie
From that excerpt, I'm not sure how she made the logical leap to possibly "petroleum oil". Does she have other evidence for it being petroleum oil? Perhaps it could have also been a unique seed oil, nut oil, or vegetable oil that came from a plant that usually grows at higher altitudes -- hence "mountain oil".



posted on Oct, 16 2015 @ 03:03 PM
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I think what is being referred to is shale oil or kerogen shale. It's a version of mineral oil and was used as far back as the 14th century in some places in Europe for lamp oil, lubricants etc and was used as a substitute for whale oil and is still being used today.


Shale Oil Wiki

Oil Shale Wiki

So it is possible, but the amount it costs to get it, refine it and make it useable isn't cheap. In the second link it says that it's more expensive to make compared to petroleum because of the energy in to energy out ratios (how much energy it takes to make 100l compared to the energy that 100l will make).

So it's nothing new. Been around since the 1300s, but looks like someone's trying to put a new spin on it.



posted on Oct, 17 2015 @ 04:27 AM
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originally posted by: Soylent Green Is People
a reply to: TheBadCabbie
From that excerpt, I'm not sure how she made the logical leap to possibly "petroleum oil". Does she have other evidence for it being petroleum oil? Perhaps it could have also been a unique seed oil, nut oil, or vegetable oil that came from a plant that usually grows at higher altitudes -- hence "mountain oil".


If you read the article she alludes to more on it in her book, so I guess if we buy the book that she would have more information in there. All I caught from the interview was what I've already stated that she alleged, but I didn't catch the whole show or even that whole segment so there may have been more in that interview. I just thought I'd throw it up here and see if anyone else had any information on it. That article was all I found in a brief search.



posted on Oct, 17 2015 @ 06:25 AM
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a reply to: TerryDon79

Kerosene as a lubricant? I was under the impression (from working with metals) that kero is a cutter, not a lubricant?. I no longer use kero for cutting (milling), but in the old days it was the go-to.

To the OP:
Mountain Oil to me would be oil from coal, just going by my own knowledge base on oils. I'm not absoulte that is what they mean by "mountain oil", but that is my thought.



posted on Oct, 17 2015 @ 09:22 AM
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originally posted by: ItVibrates
a reply to: TerryDon79

Kerosene as a lubricant? I was under the impression (from working with metals) that kero is a cutter, not a lubricant?. I no longer use kero for cutting (milling), but in the old days it was the go-to.


That's because it's a mineral oil before refinement. Also there's by products after converting it into fuel. I've looked into it quite a lot as I live in Scotland, but it's certainly not viable for an individual to do it.



posted on Oct, 17 2015 @ 12:06 PM
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a reply to: ItVibrates
I still use a solvent, WD 40, milling aluminum in our open machine, can't put enough mist or flood coolant at those high speeds to clear the chips, without making a huge mess.



posted on Oct, 18 2015 @ 10:54 PM
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a reply to: TerryDon79
yeah i remember reading about a man who built a cabin back in the day who used some oil shale in the construction of his chimney needless to say he burned down his house the first time he lit the fireplace




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