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I Have MRSA Right Now.

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posted on Oct, 11 2015 @ 11:35 AM
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I have read that people are having success using colloidal silver. It works as an antibiotic. Also, if you have a piece of pure silver (coin etc) you can easily make your own. Lots of youtubes available.




posted on Oct, 11 2015 @ 11:37 AM
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a reply to: MyHappyDogShiner

Ive caught MRSA twice and both times had to have it removed surgically....

Never during that time though did i ever feel sick........

Sounds like to me its gotten heavy into your bloodstream (or youre just sick in conjuction and its a coincidence)

Should probably go in and have it removed



posted on Oct, 11 2015 @ 11:38 AM
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a reply to: misskat1

Yes just rub some honey on it and silver, sounds legit


I'm not trying to be rude I really am not, but I don't think medical advice is fair from this gallery in this situation, he probably needs a hospital but that's all I'm going to say.



posted on Oct, 11 2015 @ 11:39 AM
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I've had a MRSA infection before and I completely sympathize. Most likely picked it up at the gym. One of the most painful months of my life. I don't remember my treatment and I don't dole out medical advice as I'm not a professional. It definitely gave me OCD however. I carry a vat of cleaning gels with me all the time now, never touch doors and being very creative in avoiding germs. I even swab my nostrils with hydrogen peroxide. I think MRSA did me more mental damage than anything else. Hope you get better and get the money you are owed.



posted on Oct, 11 2015 @ 11:40 AM
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a reply to: TechniXcality

Agree, Tech, but the hospitals arent curing the MRSA, they are actually spreading it around. My son caught it from the hospital. Really.

well.blogs.nytimes.com...
edit on 11-10-2015 by misskat1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 11 2015 @ 11:42 AM
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a reply to: pl3bscheese

Don't laugh about Manuka honey. Oregano oil is also a great suggestion.

This is a picture of a HUGE hot spot on my boy's ass-end. When I started treating it, it was crusty, pussy and bloody (sorry, but it was gross.) A vet will give a steroid shot to stop the itching, an antibiotic to take for two weeks, and a topical antiseptic, but I treated it myself. This is a pic after 5 days of treatment.



Here's how I treated Jaia's "hot spot". Now, it's totally healed.

1/2 C Apple Cider Vinegar (with the Mother)
1/2 C filtered water
10 drops Tea Tree Oil
Combine those three in a small squirt bottle and spray area twice a day, let it sit for a couple minutes and pat dry (It will sting at first). Then spread on a film of Manuka Honey topically and take 1/2 teaspoon internally.

MRSA and Manuka Honey

MRSA and ACV

MRSA and Tea Tree Oil

This is the honey I have. The MGO and UMF ratings are important and I researched all that before buying. Manuka Health

Good luck, whatever course you take!
edit on 10/11/2015 by Benevolent Heretic because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 11 2015 @ 11:48 AM
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a reply to: Benevolent Heretic

Just make sure it's real honey and not corn syrup!



a reply to: misskat1

Hospitals are a huge fear for me. Only as a last resort. There's too much information freely available on how to self treat most illnesses with overwhelming scientific evidence to back it up.
edit on 11-10-2015 by pl3bscheese because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 11 2015 @ 12:26 PM
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Have you tried to treat the infection topically, yet?

Here's my story. About three years ago vandals knocked our mailbox out of the ground which destroyed it. While we were digging the new hole for the new mailbox and post, a deer fly bit me on the left cheek about an inch below my eye. I slapped it, killing the fly and probably injecting everything that was in the fly into my skin. Several days later, a lesion formed and it looked like leprosy and smelled bad, too. I went to the doctor, got some salve and two weeks of antibiotics and took the whole course. That seemed to clear it up.

A few weeks later, the lesion came back, and I went to the doctor again. Same thing, antibiotics, salve and it went away for longer this time.

Three months later, it was back like a dime sized pimple with green looking pus in it. I took matters into my own hands and squeezed the crap out of it and scraped it out with some disinfected tweezers. Then I poured hydrogen peroxide into the hole and did this three times, each time boiling out what ever was in there. I then packed it full of Dollar General brand antibiotic ointment and covered it with a one inch wide bandage. That sure slowed it down a lot!

It still appears about every six months, the size of a BB, but nothing like it was before. I pull the hair that's trying to grow there, put a little antibiotic ointment on it and I'm good for another six months. It is getting smaller and smaller.

I believe the hydrogen peroxide did more good than the antibiotic ointment. YMMV...



posted on Oct, 11 2015 @ 12:28 PM
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a reply to: pl3bscheese

I have feared hospitals since I trained in one to be a surgical technician. I saw first hand how many there completely forget that they only help people to heal themselves while taking too much credit for what they do and even more money.

This medical establishment has to be fixed like any other thing used to generate profit. If I weren't a disabled veteran this might just be a death sentence for me.

That is so completely wrong.



posted on Oct, 11 2015 @ 12:42 PM
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a reply to: Benevolent Heretic
I'm glad you brought up tea tree oil ! Qtips and tea tree oil are practically the only thing in the little emergency pack for my purse



posted on Oct, 11 2015 @ 12:42 PM
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a reply to: MyHappyDogShiner

That's entirely correct, what treatment is meant to do is give the immune system a fighting chance once the critter has sufficiently mounted an attack on an area/region of the body. I look at it dynamically, as a rate of defense of the organism vs the rate of attack of the pathogen over time.

You go to a facility devoid of nutritious foods, natural sunlight, and concentrated with pathogens known and yet to be classified, have a bunch of people maybe run some tests, maybe not, take a guess, and throw some meds at the issue. Sometimes they treat correctly, other times are way off the mark. I don't know which is worse, psychiatry or medical care right now, but they both seem a bit barbaric from my point of view. We've improved quite a bit in the last century in many ways, yet in other ways either stayed the same or even regressed a little.

Now, if I need something burned/froze off, cut or amputated, I go to a doc. Pretty much anything else gets treated proactively with a healthy lifestyle, or after the fact with a bit of research and common sense.



posted on Oct, 11 2015 @ 01:13 PM
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a reply to: misskat1

Mom?

J/k. Story is very familiar though. After many treatments for many out breaks that all started with an "Staph" infection in my face that I got working in an upscale Oil and Gas Investment company. Infection spread to my brain and I was very near death, spent a week in ICU. It was finally a nurse practitioner in my same Dr's office that gave me ointment to put on the site and in my nose. No more troubles for many years, though it did come back after I ran out of ointment, then I discovered Calendula Gel is just as effective, is OTC and does not rely on over using antibiotics. I have a Tom cat that likes to get bit and grow abcesses and the Gel heals him in a couple of days. Razor burn, cuts scrapes, etc don't stand a chance and it is from a plant.

OP get the Calendula GEL it comes in cream and salves but the Gel seems to absorb better and is more effective.



posted on Oct, 11 2015 @ 01:20 PM
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a reply to: wastedown

Son! Ill claim ya. Was this in Shasta county? Just curious.

Good to know about the Calendula, I keep it growing in my yard and use if for all kinds of skin problems.



posted on Oct, 11 2015 @ 01:42 PM
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Just so everyone knows, MRSA cannot be transmitted through insect or spider bites. However, it is fairly common for MRSA, especially initially, to be confused for insect or spider bites. Chances are you picked it up from a client's home or place of business.


MRSA is spread by:

Skin-to-skin contact. MRSA can be transmitted from one person to another by skin-to-skin contact. While MRSA skin infections can occur in participants of many types of sports, they're much more likely to occur in contact sports — such as football, wrestling and rugby.
Touching contaminated objects. If drainage from an MRSA skin infection comes into contact with an object — like a towel, weight training equipment or a shared jar of ointment — the next person who touches that object may become infected with MRSA bacteria.

MRSA: Understand your risk and how to prevent infection - Mayo Clinic

I've had MRSA too, which I acquired in the hospital. The antibiotics took care of it within two courses, with no issues in a couple years.



posted on Oct, 11 2015 @ 01:44 PM
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a reply to: misskat1

Be very careful with that. You could end up like Paul Karason.




posted on Oct, 11 2015 @ 01:47 PM
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a reply to: cmdrkeenkid

He went way overboard with the colloidal. He used it everyday for years, everything in moderation.



posted on Oct, 11 2015 @ 02:04 PM
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Have you researched Allicin

www.allimed.us...



posted on Oct, 11 2015 @ 02:07 PM
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originally posted by: misskat1
a reply to: TechniXcality

Agree, Tech, but the hospitals arent curing the MRSA, they are actually spreading it around. My son caught it from the hospital. Really.

well.blogs.nytimes.com...


you cant really cure MRSA thought thats the thing, MRSA is just drug resistant Staph, and you cant wipe out staph from the world



posted on Oct, 11 2015 @ 02:22 PM
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a reply to: OptimisticCynic

Funny you should come up with that as I have been trying to tell people around me that Staphylococcus Aureus exists in the environment and always has along with the Streptococcus which accompanied this infection.

The thing that has me concerned is whether there may be an underlying and unidentified condition that is causing my immune system not to work as well as before.

It may be stress which reduced my immune response as I was working from dawn till dusk for about 4 months without enough exercise and a pretty poor diet from eating out a lot.

There is such a thing as working too hard after one gets past 45 years old or so, just go look at the obits and around the hospitals....



posted on Oct, 11 2015 @ 02:41 PM
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originally posted by: cmdrkeenkid
Just so everyone knows, MRSA cannot be transmitted through insect or spider bites. However, it is fairly common for MRSA, especially initially, to be confused for insect or spider bites. Chances are you picked it up from a client's home or place of business.


MRSA is spread by:

Skin-to-skin contact. MRSA can be transmitted from one person to another by skin-to-skin contact. While MRSA skin infections can occur in participants of many types of sports, they're much more likely to occur in contact sports — such as football, wrestling and rugby.
Touching contaminated objects. If drainage from an MRSA skin infection comes into contact with an object — like a towel, weight training equipment or a shared jar of ointment — the next person who touches that object may become infected with MRSA bacteria.

MRSA: Understand your risk and how to prevent infection - Mayo Clinic

I've had MRSA too, which I acquired in the hospital. The antibiotics took care of it within two courses, with no issues in a couple years.

I watched the mosquito bite me. I killed it while it was biting me.
I understand that the MRSA bacteria was most likely on my skin where the mosquito bit me, but I had no other wound there and that was where the infection began. My infection was not on my skin, it was subcutaneous and was in my blood. I had the red line going up my arm and it was all the way up to my armpit when they took me into the OR for my first surgery.
The site of the bite itself itched and swelled like a normal mosquito bite. But the swelling did not go down and got progressively worse. I had been given antibiotics by my family doctor that did not help and one week after the bite, I was admitted to the hospital.
I am not saying that mosquitoes transmit MRSA, but I have no doubt that a mosquito biting me was the reason that I was infected. A splinter may have done the same thing, but in my case, it was a mosquito.



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