It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Lawsuit: Your Candy Bar Was Made By Child Slaves

page: 2
27
<< 1    3 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Oct, 10 2015 @ 07:05 PM
link   
a reply to: Jakal26

This is what we get with our free trade agreements. How can profits be more important than humanity?

If Our leaders cared about humanity we would only trade with nations that have a similar minimum wage and labor laws.

Trade agreements that don't include these clauses are written by greedy people who don't care about those children, or anyone but themselves.

The TPP looks to be promoting more of the same. www.abovetopsecret.com...
edit on 10-10-2015 by Isurrender73 because: (no reason given)




posted on Oct, 10 2015 @ 07:48 PM
link   
Thank you for bringing this despicable situation to light on ATS, OP. However it is far more heinous than just chocolate - truth be told, much of our "goods" are reliant on child labour...in fact it would be realistic to say that life as we know it, could not continue without it. Let that sink in for a minute. The wealthier nations (and people) literally depend upon child labour to exist.


This page has a list of the goods produced by child labour, and also by forced labour. Expand the list to "all" to see that the scope of goods is quite wide and touches upon everything we wear, use and consume.

List Of Goods Produced By Child Labor Or Forced Labor

I don't believe that average Joe or Jane can change this with simply a political vote, however they can vote with their wallets. Also by choosing to become not only conscious consumers, but frugal ones in regards to quantity of goods purchased as well.

We are a "storage tub" culture. I see so many with garages and basements loaded from ceiling to floor with "stuff" in tubs. It isn't being used, but chances are a child somewhere contributed to the products that we store and hoard. Last year I made a choice not to live this way; you can too. Being neighbourly and sharing is but one way to effectively limit the need for mass quantities of products. Second-hand goods are another way - reduce, reuse, recycle isn't just a catchy phrase.

Not only should people live within their economical means, they should live within sane levels of product means as well - i.e. one does not need the sheer excess of tons of shoes, coats, handbags or *insert collectible here* as a necessity of life. The more that is accumulated, the more you are responsible for child labour in this world.

It takes a village to raise a child, and this world needs to pull together AS a village in mentality, and do the right thing by these children. We cannot continue to put profits before people, it is absolutely unacceptable.



posted on Oct, 10 2015 @ 08:12 PM
link   
Many people need to sue. Food is a necessity even the extra's such as coffee and chocolate. And when crooks conduct business like this, they think they spread the karma. But people still can't afford all the fair trade goods, so only the wealthy seem to be able to avoid their karma.

However, its the criminals breaking the laws, moving their businesses far afield of local laws, and stores bringing this in for profit, who are the criminals, not people who are poor buying a treat for their kids that they pressume is decent and legally bought/sold, as it was years ago.

THE CRIME IS ON THEIR HANDS, NOT OURS. PEOPLE HAVE A RIGHT TO EAT.



posted on Oct, 10 2015 @ 09:58 PM
link   
a reply to: Unity_99

Of course we all have a right to eat but as I said, we all make choices. But as we become aware, we can make more informed choices. There are other actions we can do to help child slaves. Contact the responsible companies and put pressure on them to change their practices and encourage humane labor laws.


edit on 10-10-2015 by StoutBroux because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 11 2015 @ 01:39 AM
link   
Happy you posted the info as this relates to the TPP activity as of late.



The provision, which bars countries that engage in slavery from being part of major trade deals with the U.S., was written by Sen. Bob Menendez (D-N.J.). At the insistence of the White House, Menendez agreed to modify his language to say that as long as a country is taking "concrete" steps toward reducing human trafficking and forced labor, it can be part of a trade deal. Under the original language, the country that would be excluded from the pending Trans-Pacific Partnership pact is Malaysia.

- One source

Malaysia just signed the trade deal.

Unfortunately think most of this is doomed to continue now. It's best to be aware of products, if at all possible use ones that do no support the industry.



posted on Oct, 11 2015 @ 02:01 AM
link   
Santa's elves is a visual metaphor to symbolize child labor
similar to The Wizard of Oz's yellow brick road (gold) and Emerald City (green paper $$) etc...



posted on Oct, 11 2015 @ 06:25 AM
link   

originally posted by: Jakal26
In our modern existence many of us see slavery in terms of "economic slavery" and while that slavery is abhorrent, the fact is that there still exists actual, physical slavery. Children and adults alike are subjected to unspeakable horrors, while a blind eye is turned by those making bank on the fact that much of the "modern world" is blind to that which goes on before their precious (cheap) chocolate [or insert product here] comes to them.

...[snip]...

And the chocolate industry was "shocked".....that was 2000.
....seems it's taking a long time for that "shock" to turn into any meaningful action. I wonder why that is? (not really, sadly, I know the answer already)


This is absolutely disgusting. The price of chocolate bars has been steadily rising for years while all this has been going on. Why the hell haven't the manufacturers been passing this saving on to us? They could easily knock the price down by, what, 20-30%?

They've been deliberately overcharging us for chocolate bars for years and that makes me mad



posted on Oct, 11 2015 @ 08:19 AM
link   
a reply to: EvillerBob

Well, hell, glad to see your priorities are in order.




posted on Oct, 11 2015 @ 08:21 AM
link   
a reply to: enlightenedservant

Thanks for the video, and for the bit of education as well.
I have learned some things after posting this thread that I was not fully aware of beforehand, so thanks for that!




posted on Oct, 11 2015 @ 08:30 AM
link   
a reply to: MoonBlossom




Thank you for bringing this despicable situation to light on ATS, OP. However it is far more heinous than just chocolate - truth be told, much of our "goods" are reliant on child labour...in fact it would be realistic to say that life as we know it, could not continue without it. Let that sink in for a minute. The wealthier nations (and people) literally depend upon child labour to exist.


I mentioned this and addressed it in one of my previous posts in this thread. Many of the things we consume are made by slaves, often child slaves. Sadly, you are correct (and I was also musing about this as well) that the "1st world" literally does exist on the back of slavery. I think that knowledge, in some subconscious place is often what keeps people in silence regarding the issue. (see previous posts in this thread for lengthier explanation)




We are a "storage tub" culture. I see so many with garages and basements loaded from ceiling to floor with "stuff" in tubs. It isn't being used, but chances are a child somewhere contributed to the products that we store and hoard. Last year I made a choice not to live this way; you can too. Being neighbourly and sharing is but one way to effectively limit the need for mass quantities of products. Second-hand goods are another way - reduce, reuse, recycle isn't just a catchy phrase.



I buy many second hand goods and I recycle a lot of stuff, mainly because some of it is profitable to me...but regardless.
I live in the country, in a fairly "poor" region of VA (US)...so a lot of my second hand buying, reusing, and recycling is about necessity more than anything else. But living like this has taught me many things about all the junk others hoard and how very unnecessary most of the stuff we stash away actually is....I am thankful for the fact that I haven't had the money to just buy and throw away at a whim. It is truly a blessing to realize that most of this crap is not needed and serves no purpose but to inflate our ego and our desire for "more"....

..............
Thanks for that link, btw. That will come in handy.



posted on Oct, 11 2015 @ 09:42 AM
link   

originally posted by: Puppylove
a reply to: MystikMushroom

If people got paid more and treated ethically they might be able to afford the 8 dollar coconut water


Mmmmmm, not really. I get what you're saying, but that's not how capitalism works.

Ethical treatment definitely would not affect the price of goods, so that definitely must change.

You need oceans of poor and islands of rich to make capitalism work though. Ask any economist.

So if you bump up the wages so everyone could afford $8 coconut water, well, they still wouldn't be able to afford it because the water would then be $16...and so on ad infinitum to make for the increase in labour costs. Or until the economy/ society totally implodes. Which it will, as this is the game plan on the books so far in "developed" countries. It ultimately isn't sustainable to just increasing wages. Minimum wage increases in and of itself can drive inflation. Thus ruining an already fledging economy.

What would be sustainable would be to just move off a monetary economy and towards a resource based economy. Thus removing the pyramid scheme and the need for oceans of poor and islands of rich.



posted on Oct, 11 2015 @ 09:48 AM
link   
a reply to: Sparkymedic




What would be sustainable would be to just move off a monetary economy and towards a resource based economy. Thus removing the pyramid scheme and the need for oceans of poor and islands of rich.


Imagine the billions of people around the world suddenly consuming resources at the rate of those in the US or other "developed" countries, on top of those already consuming.
How is that "sustainable"? Serious question.

Wouldn't we quickly....idk....run out of resources?
What of those who don't produce but are still yet consuming?



posted on Oct, 11 2015 @ 11:41 AM
link   

originally posted by: NewzNose
a reply to: enlightenedservant

We are ALL slaves to someone or somebodies. The difference is, we pretend those lower station slaves either do not exist or somehow deserve their fate. It is stories such as this that peel off the scab of delusion and expose truth.

There but for the Grace of....go I.



Uh no, we're not slaves. People use the word "slave" far too loosely. The people mentioned in this thread are actual slaves. As in, people who have been purchased, are owned, have no freedom, and are forced to do uncompensated labor.

We're not slaves if we can go where we please, work virtually where we please, refuse to repay a debt like filing for bankruptcy, etc.



posted on Oct, 11 2015 @ 11:59 AM
link   
a reply to: MoonBlossom

I wish I could star your post 100 times. So much truth in it (Ok, maybe not 100. Probably closer to 79 times
)

To add to what you posted, there's a website called SlaveryFootprint.org slaveryfootprint.org... After answering a brief survey (goods you use & the such), it gives a break down of how many slaves were used to make those goods globally.


originally posted by: Jakal26
a reply to: enlightenedservant

Thanks for the video, and for the bit of education as well.
I have learned some things after posting this thread that I was not fully aware of beforehand, so thanks for that!



And thanks for making this thread.
edit on 11-10-2015 by enlightenedservant because: (facepalm) Was trying to respond to several posts at once. screwed up royally. probably need to slow down & look over my posts before finishing them



posted on Oct, 11 2015 @ 12:11 PM
link   
a reply to: enlightenedservant

I have to agree. Though "economical slavery" is very real for many, including myself really....in a thread of this nature, attempting to use the term "slavery" to apply to other than very real, very physical....actual slavery.....is to detach from what it is to be a slave, so we don't have to think about it so much....so we can live with the fact that "we are all slaves"......

....forget the true definition of the word long enough and people tend to forget the plight of those "they" don't want you to see, to turn a blind eye to, or to reject by claiming it isn't as prevalent as it truly is. And I suppose that's what's happened in the minds' of many....

A gilded cage is a cage, but I far prefer my gilded cage to the hell these people live. At least we have a chance.
At least in the end, worse comes to worse, I have the ability to arm up and revolt, death or no.
....be hard to even do that on any level in the situation many are either born into or find themselves in.



posted on Oct, 11 2015 @ 02:31 PM
link   
a reply to: Jakal26

I agree completely. I'm not trying to minimize the bad conditions others may live in. But I can guarantee those same people wouldn't swap situations with the actual slaves mentioned in this thread. Something my Mom used to always tell is "Be thankful because there's always someone that has it worse than you".



posted on Oct, 11 2015 @ 02:37 PM
link   
a reply to: enlightenedservant

I always hated that "be thankful because someone has it worse", cause all it seems to really accomplish saying is, never try to improve things just suck it up cause someone else has it worse and since others have it worse you have no right to feel bad for your sufferings. It's a complete bull# saying. That others have it worse should be nothing more than incentive to improve things on all levels not a way to guilt people for feeling bad about their lot in life and try to force them to accept their status quot.

Let me put it this way, that we have it bad and others have it worse is not a reason to feel better about your lot in life, it's a reason to be more pissed off at the way things are, cause it means that we have that much further to go if pretty #ing #ty lives is still better than many.
edit on 10/11/2015 by Puppylove because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 11 2015 @ 09:25 PM
link   
This practice is sick, time to add another to the list of products I won't buy.


originally posted by: Jakal26
And that is what it will take.
...actually, your post has inspired me to do a bit of research into what it is that I may be consuming or otherwise purchasing that is made by companies who are complicit with slavery any place, around the world.
I assume this will definitely be a hard vow to follow through on as these mega corps often seem to own a TON of other companies outside making chocolate etc etc...but like I said, I will try....this thread will stand to me as a reminder, as will your reply that has inspired me to further research some things for myself as well. (Thanks for that, btw)


Let me give you some advice from someone that does this. If you look deep enough you're going to find an atrocity committed by pretty much every single one of our major food companies, and if they're not doing so they're buying the products to make their food from companies that are. It is 100% impossible to find ethically produced food. The best you can do is still purchase from those corporations but not purchase the products that are a problem and even that is difficult.



posted on Oct, 11 2015 @ 09:37 PM
link   

originally posted by: MoonBlossom
Thank you for bringing this despicable situation to light on ATS, OP. However it is far more heinous than just chocolate - truth be told, much of our "goods" are reliant on child labour...in fact it would be realistic to say that life as we know it, could not continue without it. Let that sink in for a minute. The wealthier nations (and people) literally depend upon child labour to exist.


This page has a list of the goods produced by child labour, and also by forced labour. Expand the list to "all" to see that the scope of goods is quite wide and touches upon everything we wear, use and consume.


Capitalism requires slave labor to function, as does Communism for that matter. That doesn't mean every economic system does. Socialism for example has made some inroads into raising quality of life though even they can't fully eliminate slavery it's at least not quite so abusive.

Unfortunately, with maximizing profit being a competitive necessity in our way of life, it encourages businesses to buy materials at the lowest cost possible. Lower costs ultimately mean slave labor, there's not an easy fix for it.



posted on Oct, 11 2015 @ 10:34 PM
link   
a reply to: dreamingawake

It doesn't matter what the language of the TPP says about slavery. There is no minimum wage in the TPP. Pay someone 50 cents a day and now it's no longer slavery.

50 cents a day and you feed yourself or become a slave and be fed by your slave owners. Is there a difference?




top topics



 
27
<< 1    3 >>

log in

join