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How can one 3rd grader be allowed to terrorize a whole school?

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posted on Oct, 8 2015 @ 01:09 PM
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a reply to: eluryh22

Hard to say, the article was less than informative.

He, the kid, probably does have issues, aside from overly permissive parenting. Or he could be that big a brat.

I think we all knew kids kind of like that while in school. But when I was in school, the kids, mostly, handled it. There were occasions when the teachers had to step in, but usually they watched to make sure it didn't go overboard. I had to be pulled off my best friend once on the playground...he smacked me in the face with one of those indian rubber kickballs, and it was on...instantly. But you know what? End of the day, he was still my best friend. Bloody nose and all... We remain friends to this day.




posted on Oct, 8 2015 @ 01:35 PM
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I could say let the older kids have a go but this can be very dangerous as he will get older and mark out his"bullies". Then when the circumstances are just right for him he WILL roll up in school with a stolen firearm and GET EVEN with all those that he percieves has wronged him.
He needs to be taken out of the equation away from parents and school and, and ,and I don't know. But he needs serious re-aligning with society otherwise he's just another mass murderer waiting to grow up.

edit on 8-10-2015 by crayzeed because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 8 2015 @ 01:37 PM
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a reply to: eluryh22
And that is heartbreaking.
The article here doesn't give much, that's for sure. Unfortunately, It could be the other kind of parents too, that love their child, too much. By never letting them face consequences (yes, stupid I know)

By that I mean absolutely no discipline what soever. My youngest went to school with a boy like that. And whenever he got into trouble, the parents, and grandfather, just threw money at the problem. Unfortunately, they are still doing it today. The boy finally faced consequences. 30 days in jail. For his 3rd Felony. (Clarify, would have been. It cost them over 10,000 to get it lowered.) He is 23.

So as far as what is going on with this boy, I do hope he gets the help he needs. And the parents wake the hell up, before they get into big, big trouble, when he hurts someone, and either they get sued, or charges are brought against him and them.

Sad situation really.


edit on 8-10-2015 by chiefsmom because: fixed for clarification.

edit on 8-10-2015 by chiefsmom because: addition



posted on Oct, 8 2015 @ 01:44 PM
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The kid probably hasn't been expelled because he is special needs.

That is what it sounds like to me anyway, but of course lets not wonder about that and just get into the bashing of the school when we probably know little about what is going on.

Does sound like he needs to be moved out of the school or the environment, but who knows what is really going on.



posted on Oct, 8 2015 @ 01:56 PM
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Yeah, let the kid disrupt the whole school. We can't treat him differently than all the other kids. Everybody is special ya know,,,,,



posted on Oct, 8 2015 @ 01:57 PM
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a reply to: Sremmos80

Considering the article barely had any information, it's hard to start bashing anyone (beyond, maybe, the parents).

I would say though, ever since our son started nursery school a few years back and now that he is in Pre-K, and even though I have always "kinda" known it.... I have a growing appreciation for how little teachers can really do in some of these situations.

In the example I used in an earlier post in this thread, the teacher reaches out to the parents to find out whats going on and they don't reply. Then, in the lunch room, the poor kid is screaming/crying because he wants some damned food but the teacher really isn't allowed to give the kid anything without getting permission from the parents which sounds harsh, but I wouldn't want someone feeding my son at that age without getting my permission first.

Of course, there is always contact child protective services, but the teacher is understandably reluctant to do that because once you make that call, you can't get the genie back in the bottle. I'm not saying that a call won't be made at some point, just that she is reluctant to do so until she can find out a little more.

I really feel for this teacher of our son's class. She has mentioned to my wife that at the end of the day after she has dinner with her family and all that, she still thinks about her students and when her thoughts come to this kid she is practically in tears.



posted on Oct, 8 2015 @ 02:13 PM
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I lost my first tooth at age five from being punched in the mouth by a bully-child. He was the youngest of four siblings, the older three were his sisters. He would terrorize his sisters and had no problems punching girls or shoving them down stairs. His parents doted on him saying he was "just being a little boy" and looked the other way every time he acted up or got violent over not getting his way.

Last I heard, way back in 1979, that kids behavior had gotten so bad they finally shipped his little violent butt off to Military School at the tender age of six. Never heard anything about him after that.

Someone needs to step up to this little discipline case and take charge. He needs structure and an environment centered around channeling his aggression into something more productive and manageable than terrorizing innocent school kids, otherwise his future will be incarceration...or worse.


edit on 10/8/15 by GENERAL EYES because: formatting



posted on Oct, 8 2015 @ 02:19 PM
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originally posted by: TonyS
a reply to: queenofswords

Can anyone explain why the kid hasn't been expelled from the school? Sorry, but.....if they can't, won't, or haven't expelled the brat then they get what they deserve. Its San Francisco......I guess they simply don't get "expulsion". That's ridiculous.


Remember, certain ethnic groups have to be disciplined differently in school now because it was found they were being suspended too much and too often as compared to other ethnic groups. That may be your answer ... that an California.



posted on Oct, 8 2015 @ 02:27 PM
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a reply to: ketsuko

Just wild speculation here or do you know this kid falls into said ethnic group?

Remember, white kids can get away things too.



posted on Oct, 8 2015 @ 02:29 PM
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WOW! They put the whole school on lock down because of a 3rd grader? Now I know why we are seeing the emergence of a PC sissyfied generation. The current school system is a bad example for our children, they need to grow a pair!!!!



posted on Oct, 8 2015 @ 02:55 PM
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a reply to: eluryh22




Worst part is, when my wife kneels down onto his level and kindly but firmly tells him he has to listen to grown-ups for his own safety, for a few moments he is mesmerized and behaves. Clearly he is starving for parental attention.


With the vast majority of these sorts of kids, that's all that'll ever be needed. A little attention, a little love, and a little discipline, all in measured doses.

When I coached youth soccer, back before my knees totally gave out on me, there would always be that one kid. The shy, introvert who was always at the back of the line...last to try anything. Most of the time, when I gave him, or her, a little attention, and showed them that yes, not only could you do it, but I give a damn, they would just blossom, right before your eyes. Sometimes I wanted to just smack some of those parents. It was never about the kid, it was about them...how Jr's success/failure reflected on them.

My final year of coaching I was coaching a Under-19 team, we played at a select level against teams that were, to put it mildly, better. Beginning of the season, we would lose by incredible margins. But those kids, bless 'em all, kept practising, kept trying hard, and the score began to be much more respectable...finally we started to win every now and then.

Then a parent who could never be bothered to attend, I had to give his daughters rides to games, and home from practise a lot, began to attend the games. Now this young lady wasn't the best player on the team, not even close, but if there was one who gave more of a damn then her, I wasn't aware of it. She played 100 percent full out. ...and she was improving with every game...it was so much fun watching her just blossom.

Then Dad started coming to the games. ...and that enthusiastic, hard playing girl just disappeared. Daddy dearest had nothing but mean criticisms. Some of them were just ugly. I, finally, got sick and tired of it, so our next game I got together with the ref, and the two linesmen, and we conspired to teach him a lesson in humility. He started in on her, and the ref blew the game dead, and came over to the sideline and gave me a yellow card, and him a red. He was told to leave.

That was the last game he attended. ...and shockingly, the girl I was having such fun coaching was back. Her mother, apparently, had heard about it from another parent, and had drawn a line in the sand, and essentially told him he wasn't to attend another game, and embarrass his daughter in that fashion again.

End of the season, the very last game, we played a travelling team of really good junior players. Auditioning, essentially, for the national junior team. For girls, here in the states, that's as big as it gets. Womens soccer, the U.S. is the big dog. So this team was special.

My girls played hard. Played 'em even for about thirty seconds, then the route was on. I think it was the proudest moments of my time spent coaching... Those kids kept playing. Doing everything I taught them to the best of their ability.

Then it was over. Score wise, I'm not even sure what the score was. It was that bad.

That young lady was at the center of it all. She was playing hard, making 'em earn it.

About three years later, she's away at college, and I run across her mother. I'd never met her before, and how she knew me, I'll never know... But she thanked me for giving her daughter a place to be herself, or to find herself.

It only takes one adult giving a damn to help a kid. A word of encouragement. Even discipline. ...and wonders can happen. I've seen it. Apparently I did it, in at least one case.



posted on Oct, 8 2015 @ 03:04 PM
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originally posted by: seagull
a reply to: eluryh22




Worst part is, when my wife kneels down onto his level and kindly but firmly tells him he has to listen to grown-ups for his own safety, for a few moments he is mesmerized and behaves. Clearly he is starving for parental attention.


With the vast majority of these sorts of kids, that's all that'll ever be needed. A little attention, a little love, and a little discipline, all in measured doses.

When I coached youth soccer, back before my knees totally gave out on me, there would always be that one kid. The shy, introvert who was always at the back of the line...last to try anything. Most of the time, when I gave him, or her, a little attention, and showed them that yes, not only could you do it, but I give a damn, they would just blossom, right before your eyes. Sometimes I wanted to just smack some of those parents. It was never about the kid, it was about them...how Jr's success/failure reflected on them.

My final year of coaching I was coaching a Under-19 team, we played at a select level against teams that were, to put it mildly, better. Beginning of the season, we would lose by incredible margins. But those kids, bless 'em all, kept practising, kept trying hard, and the score began to be much more respectable...finally we started to win every now and then.

Then a parent who could never be bothered to attend, I had to give his daughters rides to games, and home from practise a lot, began to attend the games. Now this young lady wasn't the best player on the team, not even close, but if there was one who gave more of a damn then her, I wasn't aware of it. She played 100 percent full out. ...and she was improving with every game...it was so much fun watching her just blossom.

Then Dad started coming to the games. ...and that enthusiastic, hard playing girl just disappeared. Daddy dearest had nothing but mean criticisms. Some of them were just ugly. I, finally, got sick and tired of it, so our next game I got together with the ref, and the two linesmen, and we conspired to teach him a lesson in humility. He started in on her, and the ref blew the game dead, and came over to the sideline and gave me a yellow card, and him a red. He was told to leave.

That was the last game he attended. ...and shockingly, the girl I was having such fun coaching was back. Her mother, apparently, had heard about it from another parent, and had drawn a line in the sand, and essentially told him he wasn't to attend another game, and embarrass his daughter in that fashion again.

End of the season, the very last game, we played a travelling team of really good junior players. Auditioning, essentially, for the national junior team. For girls, here in the states, that's as big as it gets. Womens soccer, the U.S. is the big dog. So this team was special.

My girls played hard. Played 'em even for about thirty seconds, then the route was on. I think it was the proudest moments of my time spent coaching... Those kids kept playing. Doing everything I taught them to the best of their ability.

Then it was over. Score wise, I'm not even sure what the score was. It was that bad.

That young lady was at the center of it all. She was playing hard, making 'em earn it.

About three years later, she's away at college, and I run across her mother. I'd never met her before, and how she knew me, I'll never know... But she thanked me for giving her daughter a place to be herself, or to find herself.

It only takes one adult giving a damn to help a kid. A word of encouragement. Even discipline. ...and wonders can happen. I've seen it. Apparently I did it, in at least one case.



Thank you for posting this personal narrative. It is stories like this that keep boosting my confidence in the average American. People like you are exactly who this country needs more of. The fact the mother knew you years later when you didn't even know she did, just goes to show that those who do things like you did out of their heart and genuine concern for a child, may think they are doing it in the dark.....but you never know who is watching and what kind of example you were sitting for another.



posted on Oct, 8 2015 @ 03:07 PM
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The secret to keeping a kid from acting like a monster later on and not being able to stop him comes from them not knowing to respect the parent. But the trick to installing that into a kid is that you have to do it very early on. Not exactly sure when, but early. You have to get it deep in their subconscious Not To Screw Around when told not to. Not to push past a certain point and to visually or audibly know when that point is by the parents reactions.

You don't have to hit them or physically hurt them either. It's sort of like a puppy. You just have to kind of scare em a little. (sounds mean I know but it works.) You know how you smack a puppy with a rolled up news paper?? Doesn't hurt them, but makes a noise and they react as if it does. Sorta like that. But you have to do it early or it won't work. Past a certain age it's much more difficult for them to get that implanted in there. If they hit their teens before you try and start that level of respect/fear of the parent you're wasting your time. You're kids too late to fix at that point. Just cut your losses with that one....Truth is harsh like that sometimes, sorry.

I know this works because my mother did it to me at some point. Way too early to remember it, but whatever she did I grew up knowing not to push her past a point. Yet I was bigger than her when I was like 11 or so. Still didn't want to piss her off and did my best not to.



posted on Oct, 8 2015 @ 03:09 PM
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originally posted by: Sremmos80
a reply to: ketsuko

Just wild speculation here or do you know this kid falls into said ethnic group?

Remember, white kids can get away things too.


Are you familiar with the word "may"?


That may be your answer ... that an California.


See where I used it? It indicates that I don't know for sure.


1.

(used to express possibility):
It may rain.


I also added the possibility that California was also another possibility that might explain this as they have strange policies too.



posted on Oct, 8 2015 @ 03:10 PM
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originally posted by: queenofswords
Is it time we bring back the ole teacher's paddle?


absolutely, yes. i was 'paddled' many times back in school (the cretaceous era or thereabouts). i cursed the teachers, i cursed the humiliation. and i didn't do it again.



posted on Oct, 8 2015 @ 03:17 PM
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a reply to: ketsuko

Why even bring it up?

We don't know jack about the story but you are already interjecting race into it...

Race bating much?



posted on Oct, 8 2015 @ 03:21 PM
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originally posted by: RoScoLaz4

originally posted by: queenofswords
Is it time we bring back the ole teacher's paddle?


absolutely, yes. i was 'paddled' many times back in school (the cretaceous era or thereabouts). i cursed the teachers, i cursed the humiliation. and i didn't do it again.


The cretaceous era, uh?...lol

Even in my day, (pleistocene
, all the teacher had to do most of the time was reach for it and the whole class got quiet and ready to pay attention. It was evil looking...it had holes in it to make blisters! There were horrifying stories and urban legends about that "holie" paddle!

But then, that was the if-you-get-in-trouble-with-your-teacher-you-get-it-again-when-you-got-home era.



posted on Oct, 8 2015 @ 03:26 PM
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originally posted by: Sremmos80
a reply to: ketsuko

Why even bring it up?

We don't know jack about the story but you are already interjecting race into it...

Race bating much?


Not race baiting at all! Just bringing up your President and the DOJ policies!

How the Obama DOJ’s School-Discipline ‘Guidance’ Will Hurt Well-Behaved Poor Kids

Seems to fit the narrative of the OP?



posted on Oct, 8 2015 @ 03:30 PM
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a reply to: seeker1963

It is when we don't know jack about the story, almost the definition of what race baiting is.
Implying race has something to do with the story when we have almost no information about it.

I could care less about the National Reviews opinion btw, doesn't make something fact.

Thought we were suppose to just leave race out of things?

Responding with "well they did it first" or "Since they do it I can" will fit the narrative of a disruptive third grader though.



posted on Oct, 8 2015 @ 03:33 PM
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a reply to: RoScoLaz4

My fourth grade teacher, Mrs. Anderson. Older lady nearing retirement at the time, could put the fear of God into us with a mere glance over her glasses.

But y'know, we loved her dearly. When she passed, at the ripe age of 102, a few years back, the number of former students who came to see her off numbered in the hundreds, and even more sent notes, or flowers. What an amazing lady she was. I really hope she knew how many people still loved her, and more, respected her. I drove two hundred miles plus for the funeral and service. Others came even further.

She is, without hope of contradiction, the best teacher I ever had. Because she gave a damn, several of them actually. I measured/measure every teacher I know, or even know of, against her. Most come out wanting...badly.
edit on 10/8/2015 by seagull because: (no reason given)



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