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A funny look at the difference between American and British people

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posted on Oct, 7 2015 @ 03:56 AM
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a reply to: DISRAELI




I believe a northern mother might still call her son a "daft ha'pporth" (that is, worth only half a penny).


Thank you so much. I am a Northerner and I have been mishearing that for my entire life!!

I thought it was 'You Daft ape-th!' Like it was an old english word for Ape. You may jest. Now I know! Awesome!!





posted on Oct, 7 2015 @ 04:00 AM
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a reply to: MrsNonSpecific
Glad to help.
Another example I might have mentioned is "tuppenny-ha'penny" (worth only two and a half pence).


edit on 7-10-2015 by DISRAELI because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 7 2015 @ 04:20 AM
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Tis a great list!

I do know however a few people that do use the American technique of eating with cutlery and I do despair of them. It's one of my things, particularly when out in public.

Accents are very important, and you can get deeply mocked if you are living in the south and have a Northern accent, and then when you return home, you get mocked because they think you have now got a southern accent, and you have lost some of the accent.

Just found this quick guide to accents, although within most areas there are loads of variations even between towns.




posted on Oct, 7 2015 @ 04:24 AM
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a reply to: MrsNonSpecific

I am from South East England... and I was recently in Blackpool for a Stag do. We all got laughed at for our accents by the locals, but they were so nice and friendly as well it must be said. It was all tongue-in-cheek



Also your video isn't working





edit on 7-10-2015 by brace22 because: vid not working comment



posted on Oct, 7 2015 @ 04:29 AM
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a reply to: brace22

It's easier for me to put the vid up than explain to MNS how to do it AGAIN....


edit on 7/10/2015 by nonspecific because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 7 2015 @ 04:39 AM
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a reply to: brace22

THAN

Not "then" you giant,fat,gun-toting,bad dress-sense septic tank!

They should stay on their side of the pond if they wish to maltreat my beloved language.

Oh,by the way,thanks for helping us in WW2.



posted on Oct, 7 2015 @ 04:44 AM
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originally posted by: brace22
a reply to: MrsNonSpecific

I am from South East England... and I was recently in Blackpool for a Stag do. We all got laughed at for our accents by the locals, but they were so nice and friendly as well it must be said. It was all tongue-in-cheek



Also your video isn't working






Im from the SE and I got mocked in Staffordshire!

Apparently im posh.


Still American girls love it



posted on Oct, 7 2015 @ 04:46 AM
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a reply to: Ericthedoubter


I had to really look hard to find what you was talking about!! Catsup?

I thought I made an error somewhere







edit on 7-10-2015 by brace22 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 7 2015 @ 04:47 AM
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a reply to: crazyewok


That's the one thing that bugs me. We are not all posh from down this way. I live near Southend... Posh is extinct here lol. There are those that try, yes, but... They just can't quite nail it.



posted on Oct, 7 2015 @ 04:51 AM
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originally posted by: brace22
a reply to: crazyewok


That's the one thing that bugs me. We are not all posh from down this way. I live near Southend... Posh is extinct here lol. There are those that try, yes, but... They just can't quite nail it.





Im from chatham so i know what you mean most of us are far from posh.

Still im not complaining if it pulls girls abroad



posted on Oct, 7 2015 @ 04:54 AM
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a reply to: crazyewok

My sister who has remained in Blackburn, Lancashire sounds SO SO northern to me now. I am considered posh. However, I can broaden my accent for comic affect when needed.

My friends love me saying 'Fairy' (Furry)

Classic confusion was when I was discussing a dream I had about being in a Coma and my friend thought i was talking about the indian dish a Korma. Yes, I was dreaming abut being in a curry my dear friend. LMAO!

Also the classic, due to Peter Kay. "Garlic Bread"- Having none of that foreign muck!



posted on Oct, 7 2015 @ 04:56 AM
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a reply to: crazyewok


It doesn't matter how you get there... Just as long as you do








posted on Oct, 7 2015 @ 04:57 AM
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a reply to: MrsNonSpecific


LOOOOOL Korma!!!

We got mocked in Blackpool for saying BARTHroom inseatd of BATHroom






posted on Oct, 7 2015 @ 05:09 AM
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a reply to: brace22

I get that all the time!

It is Bath!
No 'R'.
Same with 'Grass'

and 'Plaster' not 'PlaRster'.




posted on Oct, 7 2015 @ 05:19 AM
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originally posted by: lucia2389
that is a very amusing list. loved to read what you observed and with most i agree although it is a long time since i've been there

maybe things have changed, or maybe it is true from an american perspective, i'm not sure, but there is one thing i definitely do not agree with and that is that food is generally outstanding. but further down i read, that you better like peas potatoes and sausages. that's more like i remember. and also, yes, they boil a lot.

aren't the british so funny with their fork and knife. everything has to be piled up on the back of the fork. even the peas.

but the british are lovely. i so do agree that they are well educated and fun.


As a Brit living in Britain I can definitively say the only time I have seen anyone ever pile peas onto the underside of a fork is when it's on TV or in a film and is depicting stereotypical 'posh' people. Other than that I can only assume it's a regional thing in some parts of the country.

Can't remember when in our household we last boiled anything other than the kettle, rice, pasta or an egg either (veg is steamed), but like cliches, stereotype exist for a reason and it's nice to see all of the ones listed are good humoured.
edit on 7-10-2015 by uncommitted because: piece = peas



posted on Oct, 7 2015 @ 05:25 AM
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a reply to: uncommitted

I always pile my peas on the top of my fork, to me doin it the other whay is what children do when they lack the dexterity to balance them
Also youjst need something a bit squishy to hold them in place.

As to the boiling I agree that it is something of an outdated stereotype, my grandparents boiled everything to death unless it was meat, then it was either burned or roasted to an almost unedible crisp.



posted on Oct, 7 2015 @ 05:39 AM
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a reply to: nonspecific

That reminds me as we are in October my mother will have put the veg on for Christmas dinner.



posted on Oct, 7 2015 @ 05:52 AM
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Having lived in Italy and been all around Europe while I was a teen, the list gave me a good chuckle!

However, the part about how someone 5,000 years ago stacked rocks up everywhere, but no one seems to know why, made me burst out laughing!

I would love to see the same kind of list done by a British person who visited the US.



posted on Oct, 7 2015 @ 06:25 AM
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a reply to: eriktheawful

I can't find a list. Maybe ATS should do a competition.

I went to the US 12 years ago, ad the only thing that stuck in my head was the following.

1. Massive portions
2.Very very straight boring concrete roads, where we seemed to drive, very very slowly
3. We stopped everyday for 'gas' in our Pontiac Aztec we hired. Awful car.
4. Boston is very english, but I can't remember specifics as to why.



posted on Oct, 7 2015 @ 06:53 AM
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originally posted by: lucia2389

aren't the british so funny with their fork and knife. everything has to be piled up on the back of the fork. even the peas.


Nobody would bother if you turn the fork around and "spoon" your peas.....unless you are eating somewhere that has at least 3 sets of knives per setting! But make sure you keep that knife in your right hand



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