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Roughly 6,000 federal inmates to be released - All inmates due for release are drug offenders

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posted on Oct, 6 2015 @ 10:38 PM
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Roughly 6,000 federal inmates to be released - All inmates due for release are drug offenders


WASHINGTON (CNN) -
In a move to reduce prison overcrowding and provide relief to inmates given harsh sentences in drug cases, the federal Bureau of Prisons will grant early release to about 6,000 inmates beginning later this month, officials confirmed to CNN.

The mass release is the largest in the Bureau of Prisons history and the first wave of what could be tens of thousands of early releases, officials said.

The mass release was triggered by the U.S. Sentencing Commission, which lowered maximum sentences for drug offenders last year and made the change retroactive.

Even with the Sentencing Commission's reductions, drug offenders will have served substantial prison sentences, said Sally Quillian Yates, a deputy attorney general with the Justice Department.

Moreover, the reductions are not automatic, she said. Under the commission's directive, federal judges are required to carefully consider public safety in deciding whether to reduce an inmate's sentence.

"The Department of Justice strongly supports sentencing reform for low-level, non-violent drug offenders," Quillian Yates said.

Once inmates are released, she said, probation officers "are working hard to ensure that returning offenders are adequately supervised and monitored."

About one-third of the 6,000 inmates slated for release between October 30 and November 2 are non-citizens so they will be turned over to U.S. Immigration Custom Enforcement officials for deportation proceedings, according to one Justice Department official.


Click link for remainder of article...

Its a start...

Its not going to be a blanket amnesty as judges will be required to review each early release and weigh certain factors to ensure its appropriate while taking public safety into account. The changes comes from the change in sentencing guidelines. The changes made were retroactive, covering all individuals charged / convicted under drug laws.

Thoughts ATS?




posted on Oct, 6 2015 @ 10:46 PM
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Part of me says "uh,oh" big oopsie on the way. The other part reminds me of my younger days and just trying to have fun. No different than alchohol



posted on Oct, 6 2015 @ 10:53 PM
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About one-third of the 6,000 inmates slated for release between October 30 and November 2 are non-citizens so they will be turned over to U.S. Immigration Custom Enforcement officials for deportation proceedings, according to one Justice Department official.


Deportation proceedings? There are so many who have been arrested and deported numerous times. They just keep coming back.



posted on Oct, 6 2015 @ 10:57 PM
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What's the over under on how many will be back in jail in under 2 years?



posted on Oct, 6 2015 @ 10:58 PM
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a reply to: Xcathdra

Well, I personally think drug offenders should be admitted to a rehabilitation center to get dried out and get counseling, instead of imprisoned. Yes they broke the law, but they are addicted to a substance. Would it really cost the taxpayer more to get them cleaned up instead of just put in a regular jail???



posted on Oct, 6 2015 @ 11:00 PM
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a reply to: Xcathdra

i think this is a good descision, drugs are bad, but my taxes going to take care of drugies is worse, i would hope the drug offenders they picked were non violent offenders, and maybe had a screening before being choosen to be released. even a non violent offender can become one after being locked up like cattle and treated less than human. btw i dont consider weed a drug.


+1 more 
posted on Oct, 6 2015 @ 11:11 PM
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Release the cannabis offenders first.
There are people doing ridiculous time for having a little herb.
They are no threat to society.



posted on Oct, 6 2015 @ 11:24 PM
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If it was for non violent drug offenses then they should have never been in prison in the first place. For something like that they should have just been placed under house arrest.



posted on Oct, 6 2015 @ 11:26 PM
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originally posted by: skunkape23
Release the cannabis offenders first.
There are people doing ridiculous time for having a little herb.
They are no threat to society.

Quoted for truth. The only thing they are a danger to is a bag of Doritos and a pizza.



posted on Oct, 6 2015 @ 11:33 PM
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originally posted by: skunkape23
Release the cannabis offenders first.
There are people doing ridiculous time for having a little herb.
They are no threat to society.

Well , again you and I agree...



posted on Oct, 6 2015 @ 11:37 PM
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a reply to: buster2010

I agree with you . Unusual isnt it. However , why house arrest ? If it wasnt for a violent offense with a possession charge. The police officers do not lock up any person drinking beer at home , do they ? You are under arrest for drinking 3 beers in your home and being a peaceful drunk.......



posted on Oct, 6 2015 @ 11:37 PM
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I suppose inflation finally reached a point where more people in prisons is finally costing money to the for profit prison industry instead of raking in the dough. They can still capitalize on probation and parole costs I suppose.

Agreed that the cannabis users should get priority. However, I would not grant early release to someone who was running a trafficking operation even if it was exclusively doja if members of that operation under the individual incarcerated committed acts of violence against others. While the individual may not have directly committed an act of violence, they facilitated a racket in which this behavior was encourage or utilized for the purpose of profit, and should remain behind bars under RICO laws.



posted on Oct, 7 2015 @ 12:44 AM
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That's great news! Sure, there's pros and cons...

I agree that rehab is a better answer for most convicted drug offenders, unless they were hard-drug dealers, the bad boys. If it was shrooms or weed or peyote or..., whether dealer or user, generally, they were more a harm to themselves than to anyone else, other than fast food chains, esoteric stores and the trance section at the CD shop (oh, and wherever it is you buy those little baggies).

Generalizing is fun!
!

Gotta separate the bad from the good; who needs the most help? The meth dealer who killed a person? The shroom grower who raised a family?
We need leveled prisons, just like crimes and drugs have levels, eg, Violent crime prison, drug rehab prison, etc



posted on Oct, 7 2015 @ 01:29 AM
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People need to bear in mind this is for Federal drug convictions under the mandatory minimums. This does not affect individuals (as far as I know / see) charge and convicted under state / municipal charges.


I am curious though if states will follow suit.


As for the comments regarding marijuana I can see both sides of that argument and only because I have stopped and arrested people for driving under the influence of drugs (marijuana and prescription drugs). Some people apparently are unable to drive safely when they have a bag of cheese puffs attached to their face like a feed bag for a horse.

If you are going to partake in these items don't drive.
edit on 7-10-2015 by Xcathdra because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 7 2015 @ 01:41 AM
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Bloody good show!! Finally someone with a modicum of common sense.

Drugs and addicts should be treated in the medical or mental health systems instead of becoming fodder for lazy cops simply looking to pad their stats and arrest record.

Hopefully my own country wakes the hell up soon too and realises that the war on drugs is an abject and proven failure and that tough sentencing for addicts and users only serves to make things worse for them.

Personally I don't know how cops sleep at night, ruining so many lives for nothing. Oh wait, yes I do....they either have the heart trained out of them or were never born one in the first place.


edit on 7/10/2015 by Kryties because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 7 2015 @ 01:44 AM
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a reply to: buster2010

The only thing they are a danger to is a bag of Doritos and a pizza.

For the vast majority that's definitely the case. Still, there is much violence in the marijuana culture via its production. I'm not talking about Mexican cartels. People here in the Emerald Triangle, Northern CA [largest weed production in the nation]. There is real danger involved. As you said though, 'non-violent drug offenders' deserve house-arrest. I agree with that.



posted on Oct, 7 2015 @ 01:48 AM
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a reply to: Lucid Lunacy

The danger exists because of its illegality and the lengths people go to to not get caught or to protect their crops.

The problem would cease to exist otherwise.



posted on Oct, 7 2015 @ 01:53 AM
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a reply to: Kryties

No argument from me there. I didn't mean to present thoughts counter to what you just said. I only meant that there is real danger inherent to the way it's currently operated. I think that would go away with full legalization as well.
edit on 7-10-2015 by Lucid Lunacy because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 7 2015 @ 03:40 AM
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Any person imprisoned for a victimless crime should be immediately released; and with the injustices in the burgeoning state prisons - many of them private, for-profit prisons - they should be prioritized.
The percentage of the female population locked away in these institutions BECAUSE THEY WERE PROSTITUTES is a silent travesty, motivated by corporate greed and the identical assurance that comforts the many serial killers who have and will continue to target low-level, low priced hookers: society doesn't care what happens to them. They're invisible. They have no voice. They have no lobby. And usually, they have no choice once they've begun. Quickly known to the local police, once a girl either chooses, is coerced - or, more often than not, forced - to "walk the track," with few exceptions, the area Vice cops will almost immediately notice her, stop her & make contact.
No, women are not imprisoned for a single Solicitation charge. But what happens is that her first charge ends up with at least a night in jail, court dates, and some fees. Perhaps a short probation. As soon as she's released she must return to the same streets, with the same pimp, & the same cops. A few minor charges; perhaps a possession or paraphernalia charge, another Solicitation charge or two, and she's graduated to real probation (with real drug testing.) Perhaps even sentenced to drug court with it's daily classes & weekly UA's, both of which they must pay for at $100+/week, and sooner or later they just slip up 1 too many times & end up with 5 years in prison.
I wonder if there's a single john in prison?



posted on Oct, 7 2015 @ 03:41 AM
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a reply to: Lucid Lunacy

Sorry, wasn't having a go at you or anything, I was posting from a tiny phone while sitting in a doctors waiting room so I made it as short and sweet as possible



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