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Anxiety sufferers here?

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posted on Oct, 6 2015 @ 07:38 AM
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Hey guys i suffer from anxiety, it is growing worth in recent years.
I would love to know if there is anyone else on here who sufferes from anxiety, and maybe we can discuss what you take etc.


I am on Citolopram 20mg, but it isnt very helpful, i actually feel better without it.

I am not depressed or anything, i just have very bad anxiety

Looking forward to hearing from people

Hugs




posted on Oct, 6 2015 @ 07:42 AM
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my wife has severe anxiety... and i mean severe. She was taking mirtazaprine for its sedative effects, but it started playing with her mind and made her go absolutely nuts. Once the Dr's took her off it, she was herself again.
Now she takes Klonopin at night and it seems to help



posted on Oct, 6 2015 @ 07:58 AM
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Check out the mineral supplement Lithium Orotate. Not to be confused with the psychiatric drug known simply as "Lithium", Lithium Orotate is a nutritional supplement that can be purchased at most vitamin stores. (It's cheap too.)

Read some of these customer reviews on Amazon:
Lithium Orotate

Like many supplements, results vary widely. For some people with anxiety, it's effects are miraculous.
An added benefit is it actually improves mental focus while reducing anxiety.


edit on 6-10-2015 by ColeYounger because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 6 2015 @ 08:27 AM
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a reply to: Macenroe82

My wife is the same she was also given mirtazapine which made her phsycotic almost i might try that lithium orotate just done some reserch on it it sounds good. ive had to take antidepressants myself for anxiety and ive found buspirone help me.



posted on Oct, 6 2015 @ 08:32 AM
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a reply to: Macenroe82

No forget the lithium orotate ive just read the dangers of it



posted on Oct, 6 2015 @ 08:39 AM
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I have mild anxiety where I get worried and anxious and it makes me feel like I have a knot in my stomach. I take alprazolam and it helps to take the edge off.



posted on Oct, 6 2015 @ 08:40 AM
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i have been told by a few docs that symptoms ive reported sound like anxiety. Heres the problem with anxiety though.....first it isnt always what you think it is.....meaning you can feel totally calm mentally and have spikes in blood pressure, heart rate, tremors, shaking, faintness, etc and those can be symptoms of anxiety without the obvious mental component we usually associate with anxiety. Coming to terms with that reality took a while for me because im a very cool calm and collected person who doesnt vary widely in my mental state. When someone told me i was suffering anxiety i thought they were nuts! However now i realize the nervous system is very complex and much of it is beyond our conscious control.



Second, If i were you id spend some real time evaluating all the possible triggers in your life which could be overloading your sensory inputs and nervous system.....with a big focus on dietary stimulants such as sugar, caffeine, refined flour products, etc. Also look at your sleep schedule. No one likes to hear it but sleep is probably the single greatest determiner of how well we can handle stress. Our adrenal glands create stress hormones which can wreak havoc if they are out of balance. Look into adrenal insufficiency, adrenal fatigue, pregnenolone, have your thyroid checked......look at your relationships, your diet, etc....


Ive gone thru benzodiazapine withdrawal......stay far away if you can. Natural methods such as valerian and magnesium can help and dont have the horrible side effects of meds.



posted on Oct, 6 2015 @ 08:48 AM
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If something is making us anxious wouldn't it be better to figure out what that is instead of taking something to remove the symptoms?

Just burying a problem doesn't remove it. It won't stay buried forever, some emotional storm will eventually come and float the bodies in the graveyard to the surface.



posted on Oct, 6 2015 @ 08:50 AM
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a reply to: zedy63

Where did you read that Lithium Orotate is dangerous?

“In small servings (15 mg/day), lithium orotate has been shown to protect the central nervous system.” -Dietrich K. Klinghardt, M.D, Ph.D.


"It’s actually a mineral-part of the same family of minerals that includes sodium and potassium.” -Jonathan Wright, M.D., author of “The Importance of Lithium Supplementation”

Medical doctors are now speaking out about the essential trace mineral known as lithium, promoting its incredible therapeutic benefits at low servings. “Lithium is one of the most important elements in the human body.” -Lawrence Wilson, M.D., author of “Lithium”




SOURCE



posted on Oct, 6 2015 @ 09:03 AM
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Anxiety sufferers here?



Yes, In the past. Much better now that I have quit drinking so much.



posted on Oct, 6 2015 @ 09:03 AM
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a reply to: lamplighters

Sometimes I think anxiety runs in families. My wife, my daughter, my niece and my wife's niece all have bouts with anxiety. What's even more ridiculous is our dog has anxiety!!

My wife doesn't believe in taking anything for it and does her best to cope with it. My wife's niece on the other hand is on ativan, which has made her become addicted to it and a few other prescription drugs as well. Really she's all messed up and is in denial that she has an addiction problem My daughter is addicted to exercising everyday so she's controlling a majority of it through exercise. My other niece is also just trying to cope with it without the use of drugs. I hear taking classes in meditation supposedly helps a lot. It may be a safer way of controlling it than using prescription drugs.

As for my dog, she's a lost cause. Any noise, has her spooked. She also has occasional separation anxiety. I hope you find something which will help you get control of it.



posted on Oct, 6 2015 @ 09:17 AM
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a reply to: lamplighters

Twenty-two years of living with constant and never-ceasing anxiety - including frequent and extremely severe panic attacks - all thanks to PTSD.

During that time I have been prescribed just about every medication available, some in cycles ( to avoid dependence and tolerance issues ). I have also taken most, if not all, of the OTC and health-food / herbal options available. Additionally I've undergone hypnosis, learned self-hypnosis, biofeedback, breathing techniques, relaxation techniques, used subliminal relaxation recordings, white noise, meditation, yoga, aromatherapy, years of cognitive behavioral therapy... Spent time retraining my mind on many levels ( forcing myself to replace negative thoughts with positive thoughts, forcing myself to face every trigger and fear to create familiarity, and others... right up to my current method of simply ignoring anxiety / panic as best I can for as long as I can ).

I've been through a thing or two.

The advice I'll offer is this. Every person is unique and so will their answer be. Environmental factors, body chemistry, gender, age, personal history... all of these and much more will effect what works and for who. What works for me, or anyone else, may not work for you at all. In fact some of the medications / herbs people will recommend can actually trigger anxiety and leave you spending a day or two feeling horrible and praying for it to fully leave your system. Working with a doctor or professional is the best bet.

Though I am currently doing my best without medication, it is very, very difficult and it is by no means something I will be able to maintain long term. People without anxiety disorders do not understand the extreme physical issues that anxiety can cause. An example is that blood pressure levels can spike during anxiety / panic... High enough to cause a severe risk of stroke or heart attack.

When I do surrender and go back on meds, it will be either Xanax or Klonopin, the only two medications that have ever helped me at all. Being that they are both narcotic, however, they do come with baggage. The risk of dependence is very real. Just mentioning them to a doctor can ( and will ) get one labeled as a drug seeker and there is often stigma from employers, friends, relatives, other medical professionals etc.

Short of medication, the best advice I can offer is a good daily multivitamin combined with minimizing caffeine intake and eating a healthy diet.



posted on Oct, 6 2015 @ 09:20 AM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Oct, 6 2015 @ 09:28 AM
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a reply to: lamplighters


Hey guys i suffer from anxiety,

This is something quick you can try as it has worked for me. I feel like adrenaline is the main culprit behind anxiety for me, so when I have a full blown case coming on, I tighten up every muscle I can and just squeeze as hard as possible, for as long as possible. Repeat this as many times as you feel necessary. This uses up the adrenaline and gives it something to do instead of making you feel lousy. Good Luck.



posted on Oct, 6 2015 @ 09:29 AM
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a reply to: lamplighters

Nevermind
edit on VamTuesday35am1031 by valiant because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 6 2015 @ 10:23 AM
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a reply to: ColeYounger

I googled Lithium Orotate dangers it sounded great till i read that



posted on Oct, 6 2015 @ 10:26 AM
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Thanks for the replies
well i am on citolopram
i was on 10 mg and then 20 mg for 6 months it didnt help much

then i was moved onto seltraline? i think its called, for a week, but it just made me hungry nothing else, which isnt good when i am watching my calories!

I am back onto citolopram - i was told to go back to 20mg but im taking 40mg as of the last couple of days
ive felt super anxious and weird almost all the time like i am about to burst, i have very little appetite and i feel hung over even though i havent been drunk. I basically feel dead. Is this normal? anyway thanks for replies, i will read through them and respond individually when i get back.

PS i also find it affects my memory and typing too, hence the OP
edit on 6-10-2015 by lamplighters because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 6 2015 @ 10:30 AM
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originally posted by: Hefficide
a reply to: lamplighters

Twenty-two years of living with constant and never-ceasing anxiety - including frequent and extremely severe panic attacks - all thanks to PTSD.

During that time I have been prescribed just about every medication available, some in cycles ( to avoid dependence and tolerance issues ). I have also taken most, if not all, of the OTC and health-food / herbal options available. Additionally I've undergone hypnosis, learned self-hypnosis, biofeedback, breathing techniques, relaxation techniques, used subliminal relaxation recordings, white noise, meditation, yoga, aromatherapy, years of cognitive behavioral therapy... Spent time retraining my mind on many levels ( forcing myself to replace negative thoughts with positive thoughts, forcing myself to face every trigger and fear to create familiarity, and others... right up to my current method of simply ignoring anxiety / panic as best I can for as long as I can ).

I've been through a thing or two.

The advice I'll offer is this. Every person is unique and so will their answer be. Environmental factors, body chemistry, gender, age, personal history... all of these and much more will effect what works and for who. What works for me, or anyone else, may not work for you at all. In fact some of the medications / herbs people will recommend can actually trigger anxiety and leave you spending a day or two feeling horrible and praying for it to fully leave your system. Working with a doctor or professional is the best bet.

Though I am currently doing my best without medication, it is very, very difficult and it is by no means something I will be able to maintain long term. People without anxiety disorders do not understand the extreme physical issues that anxiety can cause. An example is that blood pressure levels can spike during anxiety / panic... High enough to cause a severe risk of stroke or heart attack.

When I do surrender and go back on meds, it will be either Xanax or Klonopin, the only two medications that have ever helped me at all. Being that they are both narcotic, however, they do come with baggage. The risk of dependence is very real. Just mentioning them to a doctor can ( and will ) get one labeled as a drug seeker and there is often stigma from employers, friends, relatives, other medical professionals etc.

Short of medication, the best advice I can offer is a good daily multivitamin combined with minimizing caffeine intake and eating a healthy diet.


I really appreciate your reply
and i do eat healthy, walk everywhere etc.

I put MYSELF on 40mg citolopram from the 20 i was originally told to take,
ive been on it for two days and feel terrible, like i did when i first came on or off citolopram
my heart is also racing, and i dont feel hungry at all
Is this normal?



posted on Oct, 6 2015 @ 10:30 AM
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I have severe anxiety. I take mirtazipine and lamictal. Not sure of the spelling. Anyway, most of my anxiety now stems from my ex-wife. Haven't seen or spoke to her in a while. Just remembering events send me in to panic. When I was with her I attempted suicide at least 8 times. What has helped the most is counceling. I see my councelor twice a month. It helps to get it all out. The medication is not enough. Getting the thoughts out helps.



posted on Oct, 6 2015 @ 10:32 AM
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originally posted by: FlyingWhale
I have severe anxiety. I take mirtazipine and lamictal. Not sure of the spelling. .


A lot of things like citolopram have different names for it

could mirtazipine be that? or setraline with a different name?
or is it just something completly different.



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