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Is Fukushime in meltdown??

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posted on Oct, 2 2015 @ 09:25 PM
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originally posted by: makemap
a reply to: Rosinitiate

I think Aliens found bigger planets than ours that have water. Why would they bother with Earth being low tech and have to fight 7 Billion people just for the planet? Plus I'm pretty sure they know we have planet destroying weapons right now seeing how America is killing everything on the planet through pollution and radiation.


Because ours has fish! And Lobster and crabs and muscles. Did I mention fish?


That is why the dolphins are here after all, or so I've heard.

And that's just it, the aliens were here before shutting down our nuclear missile batteries (silos), to me it says they don't want us nuking ourselves. Now imagine having to travel back home 7 billion miles empty handed. I hope it's a tax write-off.

edit on 2-10-2015 by Rosinitiate because: (no reason given)




posted on Oct, 3 2015 @ 02:19 AM
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a reply to: Rosinitiate

I like the way you think my friend. Enjoy the ride.



posted on Oct, 3 2015 @ 05:07 AM
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a reply to: Soloprotocol

They're restarting the Sendai reactor in just under two weeks.


LINK


TOKYO —
Kyushu Electric Power Co will restart a nuclear reactor in southwestern Japan on Oct 15, making it the second to return to operation after the government introduced stricter safety regulations following the 2011 triple reactor meltdowns at a power plant in Fukushima.

Kyushu Electric reported its plan to reactivate the No. 2 reactor at its Sendai complex to the Nuclear Regulation Authority on Friday.

edit on 3-10-2015 by ADAMandEVIL because: eta for accuracy



posted on Oct, 4 2015 @ 01:22 AM
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You know what concerns me, not the stuff pouring into the oceans, or atmosphere..we know about that.
But what about all the stuff Japan manufactures, and then exports to the rest of the world?
Cars for example.
Electronics and consumer electronics and entertainment electronics and gadgets.
Especially the used car import scene which is pretty big and popular in Australia and America. Used Japanese sports cars imported to these countries.

Is it possible for radiation to contaminate these things?
I assume so since you wouldn't walk into Chernobyl or Fukushima as naked as the day you were born and start touching things with your bare skin.
I did see a doco once about Chernobyl's clean up and how even the vehicles and equipment used were abandoned or something, but never ever used again by anyone.


So in the aftermath of Fukushima, we did not see a single trade ban on any exports out of Japan.a
Why not?


Is anyone testing things coming out of Japan for radiation?


What the world needs, since our leaders are not keeping us informed, is for one of those daring and ballsy investigative journalists to go into Japan and start uncovering what's really going on, how bad it really got and how bad it really is, and how it's affecting Japan, the immediate surrounding region, and the rest of the world(the pacific ocean off Japans coast does not change into a new pacific ocean when it reaches Australia or America or New Zealand or Chile).

And then have their documentary broadcast around the world, or provided for a free download online for the whole world to see, and even offered as a free online stream for those who don't want to download it.



posted on Oct, 4 2015 @ 01:32 AM
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a reply to: mortex

I did see a doco once about Chernobyl's clean up and how even the vehicles and equipment used were abandoned or something, but never ever used again by anyone.
I would not want to buy a tractor used in cleaning up Chernobyl or Fukushima. Do you have reason to think that vehicles used in the cleanup are being shipped? Anywhere?


So in the aftermath of Fukushima, we did not see a single trade ban on any exports out of Japan.
For a while fishing in the vicinity was banned but since testing shows nothing much to worry about, why ban it? Public opinion seems to do a pretty good job, justified or not.
www.unisdr.org...



posted on Oct, 4 2015 @ 06:54 AM
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We have seen terribly low invention on this field since then. They spend bilions on CERN toy while there's still no known material able to stay solid at the fuel melting point? Joke. They had years of time!!! What about undermining the pool to make sure nothing will make it to the ground waters? Ask the Russians. They had enough time to construct a city down there. What about some magnetic trap cooled with liquid helium and stuff like that? Of course it is cheaper to cool it a bit with a sea water and wait a few years.
I think it could be solved with a common sense if they found a way how to dissolve the fuel into some new kind of concrete bricks. Maybe to freeze it with a liquid nitrogen first at least to a solid state (no idea why they still use hydrogen-containing water for cooling) What about dissolving it with a mixture of liquid nitrogen and nitric acid?
CERN-toys should be banned until these little punks do their homeworks. You see, that's why scientists need a tough and assertive political authority over them!
ETA: What about a new international law - Company has to dig a 7 miles deep borehole under each reactor. If there is a problem like water go elsewhere. Too expansive? Good. Let's include existing plants and the problem is over. Not to mention no Pachunistan will desire to flirt with nuclear energy anymore with more rules like this.
edit on 4/10/2015 by PapagiorgioCZ because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 4 2015 @ 08:00 AM
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a reply to: PapagiorgioCZ

I think this is just a sign of the times. We create something we've no idea how to handle when # goes south, and we'd rather war than spend money researching full complexities of nuclear power. And we've had nuclear power for what? How many years?

lol.

Typical for Humans. If it ain't profitable, we don't want it.

Or......We've developed a secret Energy source, thus rending further atomic research mute. No point wasting money on old ideas for mass idiotic consumption.
edit on 4-10-2015 by Flesh699 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 4 2015 @ 08:56 AM
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The solution for pollution is dilution. Rather than ban exports, raise the acceptable value, and disperse it all over the world. I'm amazed that people are allowed to live in these zones and still export goods. I think they are so quiet about this because nuclear energy is big business and is touted as being so clean.

On a movie thought. What if the aliens of Roswell are humans of the future. They are a direct result of this catastrophe. We are doing nothing so as to protect the time line wormhole that brought them here. Thus protecting the technology exchange.



posted on Oct, 4 2015 @ 09:22 AM
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Melted fuel does not drop straight down to the core of the earth... that is an old myth from the "China Syndrome".

Melted fuel behaves like any other liquid... it follows the path of least resistance. There is actually a video you can google that show a deliberate melt down and how the fuel behaves.

It is viscous, similar to lava. it will branch out and cool and it flows out, most likely wont even drop 50 feet or more from the point of release.

Think of a tree..... the root system of a tree is exactly what melted fuel looks like once it leaves containment....it branches out and follows the easiest path downward.
edit on R232015-10-04T09:23:10-05:00k2310Vam by RickinVa because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 4 2015 @ 09:42 AM
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Well I had to rethink the cooling with a liquid nitrogen. You can have a good read why it doesn't work here if you wish: link
Anyway.
youtube

a reply to: RickinVa

Would it cause problems 7 miles deep with a 1000 tons of concrete poured on it? If it spreads naturally then I see it as a good thing. What if you force it to spread into some kind of Borron dust / concrete?
edit on 4/10/2015 by PapagiorgioCZ because: (no reason given)

edit on 4/10/2015 by PapagiorgioCZ because: grammar
edit on 4/10/2015 by PapagiorgioCZ because: and such
extra DIV



posted on Oct, 4 2015 @ 02:32 PM
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a reply to: greencmp they hit the water table eight after they left the building this reactor at coast water table likely only at most 20 feet below ground/



posted on Oct, 4 2015 @ 05:56 PM
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I'm quoting myself here from another thread, but the information is still relevant, particularly about what happens to melted nuclear fuel from a Fukushima-style reactor:

www.abovetopsecret.com...

www.moonofalabama.org...




martinfrost.ws...



en.wikipedia.org...


The China syndrome (loss-of-coolant accident) is a fictional nuclear reactor operations accident characterized by the severe meltdown of the core components of the reactor, which then burn through the containment vessel and the housing building, then notionally through the crust and body of the Earth until reaching the other side, which in the United States is jokingly referred to as being China.[18][19]

In reality under a complete loss of coolant scenario the fast erosion phase of the concrete basement lasts for about an hour and progresses into about one meter depth, then slows to several centimeters per hour, and stops completely when the corium melt cools below the decomposition temperature of concrete (about 1100 °C). Complete melt-through can occur in several days even through several meters of concrete; the corium then penetrates several meters into the underlying soil, spreads around, cools and solidifies. [31]


Note the annotation number, [31].

Scrolling down to check the annotation we find:


^ Cite error: The named reference google1 was invoked but never defined (see the help page).


It is important to keep in mind that there have not been many nuclear reactor meltdowns. Japan and Tepco lead the world with three serious meltdowns.

Bottom line, I don't have any confidence that anyone really knows what is going on in and under those reactor vessels at Fukushima.

Below the bottom line:

According to the theory:


However in case of Fukushima incident this design also at least partially failed: large amounts of highly radioactive water were produced and nuclear fuel has possibly melted through the base of the pressure vessels.[14]

Cooling will take quite a while, until the natural decay heat of the corium reduces to the point where natural convection and conduction of heat to the containment walls and re-radiation of heat from the containment allows for water spray systems to be shut down and the reactor put into safe storage. The containment can be sealed with release of extremely limited offsite radioactivity and release of pressure within the containment. After a number of years for fission products to decay - probably around a decade - the containment can be reopened for decontamination and demolition.


If there is fuel beneath the outer containment structure in the soil below the plant, the ground water runoff to the ocean would be a very high priority problem.



posted on Oct, 4 2015 @ 09:04 PM
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a reply to: greencmp

The japanese probably dropped in in the pacific ocean, it is now at the bottom creating the next wave of kaiju...
edit on 10/4/2015 by Brainiac because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 4 2015 @ 09:16 PM
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Um, it has been...Right?



posted on Oct, 5 2015 @ 09:55 AM
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From the article I read this:

Take for example cesium-137, with a half-life of 30 years, which makes up the largest fraction of long-lived radionuclides residing in spent nuclear fuel. One gram of radioactive cesium-137 (about half the size of a dime) contains 88 Curies of radioactivity. 104 Curies of radioactive cesium-137, spread evenly over one square mile of land, will make it uninhabitable for more than a century.


Then this:

Cesium is water-soluble and makes its way into soils and waters as it quickly becomes ubiquitous in a contaminated ecosystem.

Chernobyl, on the other hand, is a different animal than Fukushima because its explosion was much more widespread and more dense than Fukushima, where 80% of initial radiation was blown out to the Pacific Ocean. Hmm.



Surely if 2g of ceCesium-137 is enough to kill a square mile than the massive spill out into the ocean has already pretty much sealed our's and the planet's fate?

Are there any studies out there on the marine wildlife in the surrounding areas to Fuku?



posted on Oct, 5 2015 @ 10:21 AM
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Your source is a hoax site that twists real data.

a reply to: Soloprotocol



posted on Oct, 5 2015 @ 10:21 AM
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Yes, no damage. People don't realize how big the ocean is...

a reply to: and14263



posted on Oct, 5 2015 @ 10:33 AM
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originally posted by: and14263
Are there any studies out there on the marine wildlife in the surrounding areas to Fuku?
Yes, the next thread in this forum lists a couple of videos with some good information about effects on the ocean:

www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Oct, 5 2015 @ 09:03 PM
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originally posted by: Rosinitiate

originally posted by: makemap
a reply to: Rosinitiate

I think Aliens found bigger planets than ours that have water. Why would they bother with Earth being low tech and have to fight 7 Billion people just for the planet? Plus I'm pretty sure they know we have planet destroying weapons right now seeing how America is killing everything on the planet through pollution and radiation.


Because ours has fish! And Lobster and crabs and muscles. Did I mention fish?


That is why the dolphins are here after all, or so I've heard.

And that's just it, the aliens were here before shutting down our nuclear missile batteries (silos), to me it says they don't want us nuking ourselves. Now imagine having to travel back home 7 billion miles empty handed. I hope it's a tax write-off.


I doubt it. Aliens are probably more afraid of our animals than they are afraid of us. They probably don't know the capability of what dolphins can do to them. For all we know aliens are probably trying to learn from us before we kill each other. They seriously see us expanding quite fast from seeing our cities lights from space since the cold war era.



posted on Oct, 6 2015 @ 02:21 AM
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a reply to: Phage

I wouldn't fish there.

Official testing aye? A source we can trust.



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