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It's hard to argue against the fact we live in a THEOPHOBIC culture.

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posted on Oct, 2 2015 @ 06:09 AM
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Theophobe. The irrational fear of things or people religious in nature.

Admittedly, an initial definition that will be clarified and evolve by those more knowledgeable than myself.

As there are many examples of this phenomena I will cite but a couple of the more base and obvious ones and let the thread evolve where it may.

The first one I'd cite is in the U.S., it is the redefining of the "separation of Church and State".

That requires no further explanation and speaks for itself. It is the signal example of governmental Theophobic mentality. After all, government brooks no competition in Deity level power over individuals.

The next example I'd cite lies within the scientific community. This is also a "101" level comment but does describe the phenomena within that group. That is the failure to apply the same scientific criteria to both sides of the 'debate'

For simplicity's sake the "where did God come from" argument vs where did the "where did that condensed mass come from? The where did the phenomena of that mass exploding come from? The dimension points that define "space" come from"....so on.

Obviously both are 'valid' in a scientific sense yet avoided like the plague...by yes, theophobes.

Yes, this barely touches this subject, but as I have to go to work, I will lets these obvious examples begin the thread.

Thoughts?
edit on 2-10-2015 by nwtrucker because: (no reason given)




posted on Oct, 2 2015 @ 06:44 AM
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a reply to: nwtrucker


The first one I'd cite is in the U.S., it is the redefining of the "separation of Church and State".

That requires no further explanation and speaks for itself. It is the signal example of governmental Theophobic mentality. After all, government brooks no competition in Deity level power over individuals.

Your first example is a place where 90% of the population is theist? Not off to a good start. It's not a redefining of the separation, but rather an enforcement of the separation that should always have been there.


The next example I'd cite lies within the scientific community. This is also a "101" level comment but does describe the phenomena within that group. That is the failure to apply the same scientific criteria to both sides of the 'debate'

What lies? What debate? Speak clearly.


For simplicity's sake the "where did God come from" argument vs where did the "where did that condensed mass come from? The where did the phenomena of that mass exploding come from? The dimension points that define "space" come from"....so on.

There is evidence for the latter, not the former. Or are you suggesting that there is, in fact, scientific evidence for the existence of a deity?


Yes, this barely touches this subject, but as I have to go to work, I will lets these obvious examples begin the thread.

Thoughts?

You should have chosen better examples. Given that the vast majority of the population of the United States, and the world for that matter, is theistic in some way, I can cite that there's much more in the way of hatred of atheists and other religions within the religious community than there is hatred of religion directed at theists by atheists. Most atheists aren't antitheists, we just don't care about your deity of choice.



posted on Oct, 2 2015 @ 06:52 AM
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a reply to: nwtrucker
In America, isn't it a reaction to perceived dominance of Christianity over the previous couple of centuries?
As a parallel, it was very noticeable in the twentieth century that the countries where the Communist party was at its strongest (outside the sphere of the Red Army) were the Catholic countries, Italy, France, Spain. Reaction again.
Whereas in Protestant Europe, the Christian religion has been less dominant in recent times, and so non-religion tends to take the form of indifference rather than hostility.
I know that in the atheist phase of my life I was quite content to leave the religious alone, as long as they didn't buttonhole me and start arguing.
So I think "reaction" is the clue to the psychology of theophobia. (I still don't understand Richard Dawkins, though. He comes from my side of the Atlantic)


edit on 2-10-2015 by DISRAELI because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 2 2015 @ 07:08 AM
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originally posted by: nwtrucker
Theophobe. The irrational fear of things or people religious in nature.

Thoughts?


It is not exactly irrational. Look at how the Islamic world treats other people according to their religion, for example, women and homosexuals and "infidels." Now think what it would be like we lived in a theocracy run by them. As for separation of church and state, that was meant to be what it is, separating the church from the state and keeping the church out of state matters.

Most people who dislike Christianity dislike it for a good reason or two, not irrational at all. It is probably the extremists that really worry people. My main concern with religion personally is when it doesn't accept science. Science shows that the Earth is more than 10,000 years old and that evolution exists and that climate change is happening.
edit on 02amFri, 02 Oct 2015 07:13:32 -0500kbamkAmerica/Chicago by darkbake because: (no reason given)

edit on 02amFri, 02 Oct 2015 07:14:13 -0500kbamkAmerica/Chicago by darkbake because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 2 2015 @ 07:40 AM
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Theophobes? Sure there are. But to claim that we live in a theophobic culture is a huuuuge stretch of the imagination.
Is there not ample reason, rational, to fear religion? Even a cursory study of the atrocities throughout history committed in the name of this or that religion would back this up.

Your first example about Church and State seperation.


'That requires no further explanation and speaks for itself. It is the signal example of governmental Theophobic mentality. After all, government brooks no competition in Deity level power over individuals.;

You make a blanket statement to support your point and then claim that it needs no further explanation? You might as well say the moon is made of cheese and say it should be obvious.
And then you have the temerity to demean the founding fathers with slanderous, misconceived allegations like that?
Bosh. Good by



posted on Oct, 2 2015 @ 07:59 AM
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As usual, anyone who questions or disagrees with religion, especially the Abrahamic religions, is persecuting, hating, attacking, or in this case, "theophobic".

edit on 10/2/2015 by Klassified because: formatting



posted on Oct, 2 2015 @ 08:11 AM
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I watched a YouTube video of a Christian berating gays on the street recently

Maybe theology is the answer if Christians were not so lazy and self centered

I recon that people like me have a reason to dislike Christians

Talk the talk or walk the walk, the average christian, no thanks



posted on Oct, 2 2015 @ 08:14 AM
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a reply to: nwtrucker

You can believe in God without following a religious doctrine.

There is way too much radicalism, cultism, judgment, self-interpretations of scriptures, divisiveness, and control in religion. The biblical scriptures gave rise to many different religions and has been used to justify violence. This is supposed to be the word of ONE God. If it is, shouldn't there only be one world religion without any possibilities of interpretations? If the scriptures were written concisely we wouldn't have numerous religions around the world. I'm sure God would have foreseen this before allowing his prophets to write his directives for mankind.



posted on Oct, 2 2015 @ 08:26 AM
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Is there one person with an actual fear of such or we just playing buzzword.

Going to give me phobophobia.


Just because someone else is superstitious why should I have to pretend they are sane?
edit on 2-10-2015 by Lysergic because: eyeboogers



posted on Oct, 2 2015 @ 08:27 AM
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a reply to: Lysergic

I mean seriously why look to us for validation of your belief?



posted on Oct, 2 2015 @ 08:27 AM
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a reply to: nwtrucker

It seems more that people are not falling for 'blind faith' any longer and are questioning supernatural things which cannot be explained by science more than they have ever done in the past.

Don't you just think that the idea of one god who created everything in the universe and sees our every action, gave us orders to jump to and hasn't been seen for God knows how long, should have actually finished off any claim of his credibility?

There is no proof of God's existence and as he only seems to have come to our attention over the last few thousands of years and it was man's choice to decide to move on from pantheism to one god etc one needs to wonder how mankind managed before his present was postured. Obviously we did it very well as we have lived for considerably longer than the period his presence has been 'made known'. In fact since his arrival there have been so many religious wars over ideology that its a disgrace. He is more destructive than constructive for humanity despite the teaching of loving one another which obviously existed before he arrived and we were considerably better at following then.



posted on Oct, 2 2015 @ 08:43 AM
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a reply to: nwtrucker




The first one I'd cite is in the U.S., it is the redefining of the "separation of Church and State".

Separation of church and state is a good thing , although they are not completely separate.


The UK government also hold prayers in the House but that is not filmed.

"Lord, the God of righteousness and truth, grant to our Queen and her government, to Members of Parliament and all in positions of responsibility, the guidance of your Spirit. May they never lead the nation wrongly through love of power, desire to please, or unworthy ideals but laying aside all private interests and prejudices keep in mind their responsibility to seek to improve the condition of all mankind; so may your kingdom come and your name be hallowed.
Amen."
www.parliament.uk...

No church should be involved in legislation , if it were up to me there would be no formal prayers in any countries legislature , if God wants to partake he should show up in person like any representative.

There are many scientists who are religious but their choice is their choice and should also be set aside from science , if God were scientifically provable then perhaps it would be different but as is religion is a belief and not really a topic for science.

Just my views as an agnostic.



posted on Oct, 2 2015 @ 08:46 AM
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a reply to: nwtrucker

We're seeing a cultural shift from respecting personally held beliefs to being offended by people who hold personally held beliefs.



posted on Oct, 2 2015 @ 08:56 AM
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a reply to: nwtrucker

Theophobic? Not at all. In fact, I love it when I can finally get some peace from all those theophiles who are out trying to save my soul, explain why I am damned for all eternity... "If are you not with us, then you are against us" No, I really don't care one way or another about your beliefs. If you want to live like an Amish, or practice polygamy or have endless church services or eat only odd combinations of food because other combinations are "unclean", please do go right ahead. Just stop trying to get me to endorse what you do, what you believe and extend me the same courtesy by not forcing me to participate in your rituals, prayers and whatever else.

I want to live in a country where laws and made based on the principles of justice, compassion and morality -- not on someone's theology. I want to work as a scientist based on principles of science, research and logic, and not have to accommodate someone's religious doctrine, even when they call it science.

Theophobe? No.. more of an anti-theophile.



posted on Oct, 2 2015 @ 09:33 AM
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a reply to: nwtrucker

Its not that we are Theophobic but we have religious nut cases like Ted Cruz saying the following:



and this:


edit on 2-10-2015 by starwarsisreal because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 2 2015 @ 09:38 AM
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originally posted by: DBCowboy
a reply to: nwtrucker

We're seeing a cultural shift from respecting personally held beliefs to being offended by people who hold personally held beliefs.



Thats because people who hold personal beliefs offend everyone else who do not have the same belief as them, I give you Kim Davies and exhibit A, Westboro Church as exhibit B and ISIS and exhibit C.



posted on Oct, 2 2015 @ 09:40 AM
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You're confusing antitheism (the active opposition to theism, typically refers to direct opposition to organized religion or to the belief in any deity) with Theophobia (a fear of religion or gods which may incite revulsion against them. Theophobes may avoid religious texts, houses of worship, and people who believe in deities).

And youre playing the Christian victim card...




posted on Oct, 2 2015 @ 09:49 AM
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originally posted by: flammadraco

originally posted by: DBCowboy
a reply to: nwtrucker

We're seeing a cultural shift from respecting personally held beliefs to being offended by people who hold personally held beliefs.



Thats because people who hold personal beliefs offend everyone else who do not have the same belief as them, I give you Kim Davies and exhibit A, Westboro Church as exhibit B and ISIS and exhibit C.


Of course! And being offended justifies all sorts of responses! From banning, silencing, vilifying anyone who "may" offend someone at some future date and time.



posted on Oct, 2 2015 @ 09:50 AM
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a reply to: Prezbo369

They always do.
Part of the religion isn't it.
Oh and op yes many fear it and not irrational at all. Why wouldn't we fear something that asks for the end of the world with it's followers wanting it to happen.
You lot are nuts and I fear if your nuts try to prove their club right by blowing it all up.
edit on 2-10-2015 by boymonkey74 because: (no reason given)

edit on 2-10-2015 by boymonkey74 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 2 2015 @ 09:54 AM
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a reply to: nwtrucker

I am not afraid of anybody's personal religion.

At all.

I worried though, about any organized group of people who use religion as their guidepost. History shows clearly that large groups of people who get together under to common cause of 'spirituality' and 'worship, cannot be trusted with anything other than the two things quoted above.

Although that Catholic Pope is doing pretty well I must admit.

~Tenth



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