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Water on Mars... BUT NASA can't go near it...

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posted on Oct, 1 2015 @ 07:24 AM
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originally posted by: Sublimecraft

I take it you clearly and automatically accept the "United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs" authority of this treaty and all things pertaining to outer space?


If it can halt mankind from turning Mars into a world with missiles aiming straight at Earth, or turning Mars into another ecological catastrophy, yes.

My acceptance is not "automatic" - but sometimes hating just for hatred's sake is plain stupid. I happen to believe that on that particular point, the UN Outer Space Treaty has some logic to it.

Unlike some, I try to avoid my authority issues to cloud my logic.




posted on Oct, 1 2015 @ 07:34 AM
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According to NASA's chief scientist for its Mars program, Dr Rich Zurek, during a Reddit AMA it would be pretty pointless to send the Rover in any case:



...
Dr Zurek's response should satisfy most, except the most ardent conspiracy theorists: "The rovers have been sterilised for their particular landing sites where there's been no evidence of present day liquid water. To go to the RSL [sites] rovers will be required to be sterilised to a higher level. We also take samples of microbes that might be on the spacecraft before they're launched, so we can compare with any future discoveries."

Two other problems mean Curiosity can't go taste the water to test for life. The slopes are too steep and, anyway, there are no DNA sequencers on board.

"These features are on steep slopes, so our present rovers would not be able to climb up to them," Dr Zurek told Reddit. He also said: "The Curiosity rover does not have life-detection instruments."
...
We're NASA Mars scientists. Ask us anything about today's news announcement of liquid water on Mars. - Reddit.com


Wait... What?


...
As established by the Mars Exploration Program, the main scientific goals of the MSL mission are to help determine whether Mars could ever have supported life, as well as determining the role of water, and to study the climate and geology of Mars.
...
Biological
- Determine the nature and inventory of organic carbon compounds
- Investigate the chemical building blocks of life (carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorus, and sulfur)
- Identify features that may represent the effects of biological processes (biosignatures and biomolecules)
Wiki



posted on Oct, 1 2015 @ 08:36 AM
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originally posted by: NeoSpace

originally posted by: DOCHOLIDAZE1
a reply to: NeoSpace

please tell me these thing with evidence i look forward to it(not sarcastic)



I almost watched this vid until I checked, and found this "jeranism" is a flat-earther and geocentrist. And I'm going to trust him that Curiosity is in Greenland? He's a nutcase.



posted on Oct, 1 2015 @ 08:37 AM
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originally posted by: eriktheawful
There are plans to go to Europa and Enceladus.....both of which have liquid water under their icy surfaces, and drill down into it, looking for life....

I'd be interested to know what sterilization protocols they are planning for future missions such as this. I wonder if they are considering new and better sterilization techniques.



posted on Oct, 1 2015 @ 08:42 AM
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Correct me if I'm wrong... but I would think the rover would be pretty clean of life-forms at this point because anything it may have picked up on Earth or in transit would surely have died by now due to no oxygen, cold temps, etc.?



posted on Oct, 1 2015 @ 08:49 AM
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originally posted by: charolais
Correct me if I'm wrong... but I would think the rover would be pretty clean of life-forms at this point because anything it may have picked up on Earth or in transit would surely have died by now due to no oxygen, cold temps, etc.?

Science is starting to find that microbes can be very resilient, and can survive the harsh conditions of space:

Earth Bacteria Survive a 553-Day Space Exposure on the Exterior of the ISS

Tiny Microbes Could Survive Space and Contaminate Mars: Dangers of Life for the Red Planet



edit on 10/1/2015 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 1 2015 @ 08:51 AM
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originally posted by: Soylent Green Is People

originally posted by: charolais
Correct me if I'm wrong... but I would think the rover would be pretty clean of life-forms at this point because anything it may have picked up on Earth or in transit would surely have died by now due to no oxygen, cold temps, etc.?

Science is starting to find that microbes can be very resilient, and can survive the harsh conditions of space:

Earth Bacteria Survive a 553-Day Space Exposure on the Exterior of the ISS




Thanks for sharing that... I do remember reading about bacteria surviving on the ISS.



posted on Oct, 1 2015 @ 08:57 AM
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I think they need to stop worrying about it, and get on with the mission. If they were so worried about it, they wouldn't be there in the first place. I'm not sure what this BS is accomplishing, but it ain't working. Then again. Maybe it is.



posted on Oct, 1 2015 @ 10:16 AM
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originally posted by: charolais
Correct me if I'm wrong... but I would think the rover would be pretty clean of life-forms at this point because anything it may have picked up on Earth or in transit would surely have died by now due to no oxygen, cold temps, etc.?


No. Probably the most cited example of an organism that can survive harsher conditions than those on Mars would be tardigrades:


With over 900 described species, the phylum has been sighted from mountaintops to the deep sea, from tropical rain forests to the Antarctic[6] Tardigrades can survive in extreme environments.[7] For example, they can withstand temperatures from just above absolute zero to well above the boiling point of water (100 °C), pressures about six times greater than those found in the deepest ocean trenches, ionizing radiation at doses hundreds of times higher than the lethal dose for a human, and the vacuum of outer space.[7] They can go without food or water for more than 10 years, drying out to the point where they are 3% or less water, only to rehydrate, forage, and reproduce.[3][8][9][10]



posted on Oct, 1 2015 @ 10:59 AM
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what contamination?....what would be specifically contaminated by the rover digging up this "supposed wet" dirt? what organism would we be contaminated?....aren't we there to discover if life exists?.....the presumed assumption that whatever is there now, would be harmed, or changed, by something on the rover....this is friggin' mars, a barren planet for millions, if not billions of years.....guess what?....."nothing happening" is as valid as an answer as those in the treaty.....now.....if a craft brought back dirt samples from mars....then yeah, go crazy over the idea of contamination of earth life...that would be absolutely valid
edit on 1-10-2015 by jimmyx because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 1 2015 @ 11:03 AM
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a reply to: Gemwolf

I think that is saying that the equipment on board can detect what came together on Earth to form life, but not actually detect the life itself.

You would probably need a microscope on board to examine soil samples.



posted on Oct, 1 2015 @ 11:20 AM
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a reply to: MysterX

I was thinking the same thing. Plus, bacteria and viruses aren't going to remain neatly tucked in the Rover. If they exist they will find their way out eventually.

The moment it entered the atmosphere, if any damage can be done, then it already started.

Does that also mean since they already know life exists on Mars, even if it is only microscopic, that nothing from Mars can be brought back into Earth's atmosphere?



posted on Oct, 1 2015 @ 11:23 AM
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a reply to: Gemwolf

Thanks Gemwolf, something awesome to think about today.

Will open discussion with the Children later to see what they think about it.

Very cool info



posted on Oct, 1 2015 @ 11:35 AM
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a reply to: jimmyx
The point would be that when the time comes that we are able to study Mars soil samples, and we do potentially find life, we may not be able to tell if that life was:

(a.) already there (been there for billions of years) or that
(b.) it was brought there by these probes, and Mars was lifeless until then.

Even if we find life on Mars and find that it is similar to earth life, that would not necessarily mean that the probes were the ones that delivered that life to Mars. It could be that Mars and/or Earth had exchanged life millions/billions of years ago via meteorites from each planet.

If life on earth was seeded from Mars, that would be something science would want to know. The possibility of these probes contaminating Mars with life from earth would make a "Life on Earth was seeded from Mars" hypothesis much more difficult to prove.



posted on Oct, 1 2015 @ 11:39 AM
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a reply to: eriktheawful


But: bottom line. How do we know life is in that water? 


Agreed. And would we recognize it, even if it was staring us in the face?

We are still learning and guessing. I recently read an article that reports animals can see ultraviolet light. For years it was thought it wasn't possible for them to see ultraviolet light. Seems we were wrong, and I am willing to bet you the farm that we are wrong on a whole hell of a lot of other things.

We are just infants in the Universe. We haven't even started cutting our teeth. Everything we claim as fact, is only fact for the moment, waiting for another fact altering truth to show up on the doorstep.



posted on Oct, 1 2015 @ 11:41 AM
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originally posted by: Aedaeum we can't sample some water that MIGHT exist, on a barren planet, because of some piece of paper over 40 decades old... Forgive me if I don't concede to that line of absolute BS.


ditto. total baloney, as per NASA standard MO.



posted on Oct, 1 2015 @ 11:43 AM
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I have an idea that Mars, or any other world for that matter, is constantly under a barrage by Panspermia action every day...

so attributing microbe contamination to the Rover or human errors is just so much 'demonizing'
the Panspermia Theory is not a one-time walk up event --> see: helix.northwestern.edu...

there might be organic acids/proteins/etc. floating all around the present Molecular Cloud which this local area of the Galaxy is in the middle of...those life building blocks may well attach on to icy comets in the Oort cloud and fall into the inner solar system and be peppering Earth & Mars with a few hundred life-starter events each & every orbit on different places on each Planet all the time....
We and Mars are under constant 'invasion' by proto life compounds daily... we just have to plug that variant into the equasion and accept that 'contamination' is the natural process of every world's GAIA Principal

Astro-naught poop, thanks for that sound-byte



posted on Oct, 1 2015 @ 12:01 PM
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a reply to: St Udio

A good way to prove some aspects of panspermia would be to find microbes on Mars that are genetically similar enough to microbes on Earth that the similarities mean they are related to each other.

However, if we don't know for sure how those microbes got there (did they hitch a ride on a rover, or did they find their way naturally?), then it would make that aspect of panspermia difficult to prove.


edit on 10/1/2015 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 1 2015 @ 05:58 PM
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Sorry...but after so much science...I couldn't resist lightening the mood





Jane



posted on Oct, 1 2015 @ 06:35 PM
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This logic is TOTAL hogwash!

The moment there's a touchdown on Martian soil, it's technically containment. Eventually just that simple contact could potentially lead to exposure.

Second, any microbe that can sustain in Martian atmosphere AND Earth's atmosphere IS PROBABLY ALREADY THERE. Pamspermia anyone? Billions of years of contamination. How many resilient microbes do you know that can survive the supposed extreme environmental contrast between both planets?

Even if a microbe can survive 10,000 leagues under the sea, attached to volcanic vents, that doesn't mean it maintains constitution when it reaches Earth's surface.

This is just another example of NASA's horsesh!t. They are a confederate of bad actors and liars. We really need to change this administration. Thank the Great Architect other nations have their own space programs....



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