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NASA says a simple greenhouse will allow astronauts to grow food on Mars

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posted on Sep, 29 2015 @ 06:19 PM
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This is an interesting little article. It's a bit short, but does raise some points and questions.


When NASA announced Monday it had uncovered the strongest evidence for flowing water on Mars, most of the collective attention (rightfully) centered on the increasing odds of also finding signs of life. After all, water is one of life’s most important building blocks so if NASA continues to “follow the water,” as John Grunsfeld put it Monday, chances are extremely likely the Red Planet has the capability to sustain living things. However, it was something else Grunsfeld said which is arguably just as important as finding life. In a response to a telephoned media question, Grunsfeld acknowledged the presence of water ultimately allows future astronaut missions to grow living, sustainable crops. Mark Watney just gasped. Read more: www.digitaltrends.com...


Link to full article

Makes me ask a few of my own questions, such as:

  • How will they compress the outside air enough to pressurize the structures?
  • Shouldn't we send some automated test "bubbles" there to create water first?
  • At what latitude (the Phoenix lander was at the pole, where there is ample ice underfoot)?


edit on 9/29/2015 by Krakatoa because: (no reason given)




posted on Sep, 29 2015 @ 06:41 PM
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a reply to: Krakatoa

Germination of the seeds will be a task in itself. This pressurized greenhouse will have to also produce enough heat for the seeds to sprout since the average temp on Mars is minus 55c (67f).

This "simple greenhouse" isn't sounding so simple.



posted on Sep, 29 2015 @ 06:53 PM
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a reply to: TheLieWeLive

Exactly. But, it does trigger thought and questions beyond just a manned mission. I thought it was a nice topic of discussion, in light of the release of the new Martian film out of Hollywood, that, likely, will make it all look so easy.



edit on 9/29/2015 by Krakatoa because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 29 2015 @ 06:57 PM
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Would artificial light be needed or would Mars have enough sunlight during its daylight hours to allow Earth plants to sustain themselves, grow, and seed?



posted on Sep, 29 2015 @ 07:17 PM
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a reply to: Aleister

I would think a large array of solar cells would provide the power needed for grow lights (which also provide the heat). The heat for the lights might also result in the release of more water from the surface. But, making it pressure-tight at ground-level will also be a challenge I am sure. And if they need to grow plants, they would also benefit from growing some medicinals as well. Food without medicine is not a good plan either.

ETA: And the waste composted along with the human feces to make fertilizer (and more heat).

edit on 9/29/2015 by Krakatoa because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 29 2015 @ 11:39 PM
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a reply to: Krakatoa

Interesting. So would earth dirt need to be taken along as well or is mars dirt all good to go. Could be hydroponics but maybe would need a man on the ground to do it.
"A simple greenhouse" makes it sound like there would be enough sun in a mars day.

edit on 29-9-2015 by ZeussusZ because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 29 2015 @ 11:58 PM
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a reply to: Krakatoa

Aren't they making a movie about this, Matt Damon . From the previews doesn't seem like it works out so well, maybe in real life it will.



posted on Sep, 30 2015 @ 12:00 AM
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Just no potatoes, anything but potatoes!


Watch "The Martian" and get back to me...



posted on Sep, 30 2015 @ 12:01 AM
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a reply to: ZeussusZ

Yeah, there's no bacteria (that we've found) in Martian soil. We'd have to take along Earth bacteria for the soil to be viable for things to grow in.



posted on Sep, 30 2015 @ 12:04 AM
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a reply to: Krakatoa

Build a gigantic glass dome, with air ventilation system and and turn that existing salt water to distilled water if there is plenty up there am sure it can be done.

I am sure it works, because I saw Hollywood do it...


Peace
edit on 30-9-2015 by InnerPeace2012 because: (no reason given)

edit on 30-9-2015 by InnerPeace2012 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 30 2015 @ 01:10 AM
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Don't push it, show first step works before taking step two. These are primates



posted on Sep, 30 2015 @ 01:18 AM
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Simple Greenhouse? If the task of having to build a greenhouse with far more pressure and far more heat than one on earth, and constantly maintaining it, i guess thats a simple greenhouse.



posted on Sep, 30 2015 @ 01:37 AM
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originally posted by: TheLieWeLive
a reply to: Krakatoa

Germination of the seeds will be a task in itself. This pressurized greenhouse will have to also produce enough heat for the seeds to sprout since the average temp on Mars is minus 55c (67f).

This "simple greenhouse" isn't sounding so simple.


They have demonstrated that arabidopsis will germinate, and grow normally(ish) on the space station. If other plants are less responsive, arabidopsis can be utilised, transgenically, to assist that process, but given ample funding, plant breeding programs, perhaps with a little acceleration mutagenics, should be able to come up with selected plants capable of adapting to the new environment. I would assume that work is already underway.



posted on Sep, 30 2015 @ 01:59 AM
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It's simple until 1 micro meteorite decides to turn up, then no more potatoes.



posted on Sep, 30 2015 @ 05:17 AM
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originally posted by: TechniXcality
a reply to: Krakatoa

Aren't they making a movie about this, Matt Damon . From the previews doesn't seem like it works out so well, maybe in real life it will.


Yeah people were speculating the 2 issues were linked. While people are discussing the greenhouse and food I would like to point out on the conspiracy side of things that NASA's comments about water and finding life were interesting.

Any chance this announcement might be laying the groundwork for the announcement that life no longer exists on just one planet. My other question revolves around religion. What do the religions say when it comes to animal / vegetation / microbial life being found on other planets.

Maybe I'm off.. It looks like a nudge by NASA into that realm...
edit on 30-9-2015 by Xcathdra because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 30 2015 @ 06:58 AM
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Here's an idea NASA. Call up your buddies over at HAARP, and have them cook up an artificial magnetosphere with their fancy atmospheric toys. All of Mar's problems solved.
edit on 30-9-2015 by trifecta because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 30 2015 @ 07:08 AM
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originally posted by: TheLieWeLive
a reply to: Krakatoa

Germination of the seeds will be a task in itself. This pressurized greenhouse will have to also produce enough heat for the seeds to sprout since the average temp on Mars is minus 55c (67f).

This "simple greenhouse" isn't sounding so simple.


.
I was wondering why there would be a need for heat at 55°c. I think you made an mistake calculating F to C. It should be 25°c (if F is 77). But is 77F/25C not enough to grow stuff? here in the Netherlands we hardly have 25°c at all and still everything grows well.



posted on Sep, 30 2015 @ 11:05 AM
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originally posted by: MystikMushroom
Just no potatoes, anything but potatoes!


Watch "The Martian" and get back to me...


They could do a hydro set up and have a main mother plant and create clones. They wouldn't need a large variety of plants. If they pick the right ones they could grow a very nutritious diet. They should also use heirloom plants/seeds so they can harvest seeds. They should also grow indeterminate plants like tomatoes that will grow and produce for years. They would only need a couple. They could dehydrate and store their excess.


There were some limitations, for instance, the study did not factor in valuable phytochemicals and other so-called xenohormetic compounds (e.g. polyphenols) produced by environmental stressors to the plants that might drastically alter its nutritional merit by optimizing your gene expression and increasing longevity.

That being said, the 41 foods below topped the list based on nutrient density (with some surprising results).2 If you're in a veggie rut, this list offers some great ideas to expand your diet while adding valuable nutrition to your meals


Item Nutrient and Density Score
Watercress 100.00
Chinese cabbage 91.99
Chard 89.27
Beet green 87.08
Spinach 86.43
Chicory 73.36
Leaf lettuce 70.73
Parsley 65.59
Romaine lettuce 63.48
Collard green 62.49
Turnip green 62.12
Mustard green 61.39
Endive 60.44
Chive 54.80
Kale 49.07
Dandelion green 46.34
Red pepper 41.26
Arugula 37.65
Broccoli 34.89
Pumpkin 33.82
Brussels sprout 32.23
Scallion 27.35
Kohlrabi 25.92
Cauliflower 25.13
Cabbage 24.51
Carrot 22.60
Tomato 20.37
Lemon 18.72
Iceberg lettuce 18.28
Strawberry 17.59
Radish 16.91
Winter squash (all varieties) 13.89
Orange 12.91
Lime 12.23
Grapefruit (pink and red) 11.64
Rutabaga 11.58
Turnip 11.43
Blackberry 11.39
Leek 10.69
Sweet potato 10.51
Grapefruit (white) 10.47

articles.mercola.com...


edit on 30-9-2015 by StoutBroux because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 30 2015 @ 11:29 AM
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I just know that Hollywood is going to gut "The Martian" ...


The book had a lot of very technical sections in which the main character (who happened to be a botanist) detailed how everything was supposed to work. They're going to probably have to dumb the story down for the masses, as some of the sections of the book are pages of technical details on how he does what he does to survive.

Part of what made that book so awesome was the level of detail the author went into on how he grew potatoes and made water from jet fuel.
edit on 30-9-2015 by MystikMushroom because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 1 2015 @ 06:14 PM
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originally posted by: snewpers

originally posted by: TheLieWeLive
a reply to: Krakatoa

Germination of the seeds will be a task in itself. This pressurized greenhouse will have to also produce enough heat for the seeds to sprout since the average temp on Mars is minus 55c (67f).

This "simple greenhouse" isn't sounding so simple.


.
I was wondering why there would be a need for heat at 55°c. I think you made an mistake calculating F to C. It should be 25°c (if F is 77). But is 77F/25C not enough to grow stuff? here in the Netherlands we hardly have 25°c at all and still everything grows well.



The average temp is in the negative on Mars. It's around -55 not 55. Maybe I should have written it like -55 and not minus 55.

It's way to cold to get germination of any kind that I'm aware of.



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