Who has video of the ASian tsunami going 500MPH?

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posted on Jan, 1 2005 @ 06:28 PM
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They said that the tsunami was 40 feet. I have not seen any video thats howed a wave over 20 feet.

They said the initial wave hit at 500 miles per hour.

I have not seen a wave go over 100 mph or even close.


Are there any super secret scary video's that show the real destruction of the initial wave?




posted on Jan, 1 2005 @ 06:34 PM
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I think what they mean is the initial wave can go that fast, but as the wave reaches the beach, the ocean depth gets ever more shallow, which causes the wave to slow down.



posted on Jan, 1 2005 @ 06:36 PM
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The wave travels at 500 mph in the open water. When it hits the continental shelf it slows down to 20-35 mph. No secret scary videos being kept from the public. Just read more carefully the reports and most of your hysterical conclusions will be put to rest.



posted on Jan, 1 2005 @ 06:40 PM
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I think you're confusing a couple of different physical aspects of the Tsunami. The speed of 500 mph refers to the speed with which the tsunami is propagated, not the speed of the water itself. In other words, if the WAVE originates at a point 500 miles from shore, the WAVE will hit the shore in one hour. You have to understand, its not water thats travelling 500 mph, its the wave form. None of the water at the origin or anywhere along the path actually travels very far. The water that hit the coast is the same water that was there all along - just pushed ashore by the wave.



posted on Jan, 1 2005 @ 06:50 PM
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I thought a wave in the ocean wasnt called a wave, but a swell.

So I think you people are wrong also?


Thats what you get for being smart ass'es.

Im sure there is another word for an ocean swell that crests from the wind also, but I could be wrong. But just another thing to bust balls on if its true.

So I guess no scary video of wave flash flooding people like a nuclear explosion. Thats comforting.

Even if you go swimming in water with 10 foot waves, they pack a punch. I remember getting slammed into the ocean bottom by one.

So I can appreciate 20+ foot waves.



posted on Jan, 1 2005 @ 06:55 PM
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You can call it any name you like, but it won't change the physics. In any event, I believe I have a solution for you. If you'd like to see video of scary waves (or swells, or ripples, or whatever), go to the video store and rent "The Perfect Storm" or "The Day After Tomorrow".



posted on Jan, 1 2005 @ 06:57 PM
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Originally posted by Ritual
I thought a wave in the ocean wasnt called a wave, but a swell.

So I think you people are wrong also?


Thats what you get for being smart ass'es.



o_O

Swells are a type of wave.
They're generated by storms in another area.
dnr.cbi.tamucc.edu...

Ergo, calling a tsunami in the open water a "wave" is correct.

Here's a bit of reading for you.
www.pbs.org...

By the by .... let's not be calling other members names, mmkay?



posted on Jan, 1 2005 @ 07:01 PM
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A swell becomes a wave once it crests and breaks. Swells travel in the open ocean, it isn't water traveling through the ocean but a pulse of energy.



posted on Jan, 1 2005 @ 07:03 PM
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I seen Day After Tommorrow on pay per view.

It was pretty scary.

It kind of relates to the current events.

LA see's weird weather.

Then some unusual snow activity like some parts of the US getting more snow then usual.

It is almost exactly like in the movie the Day After tommorrow.


Whats next? There is a major tsunami on the East Coast of the US?Then we see a humongous winter storm?

I better stock up on ramen noodle, fuel, and blankets because I am in the NorthEast of the UNited States.

Oh and somehow preventing my death from mile high tsunami before the storm hits






posted on Jan, 1 2005 @ 07:03 PM
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most of the footage is from tourists, and of the tidal wave not looking that devasting. i dont think there's any footage of the more destructive tidalwaves that hit because those were mostly in the poorer parts. there's also some satelite pictures of the places before and after...prehaps if there are pictures then there could be some footage as well?



posted on Jan, 1 2005 @ 07:05 PM
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Originally posted by spud602
A swell becomes a wave once it crests and breaks. Swells travel in the open ocean, it isn't water traveling through the ocean but a pulse of energy.


So what is all this talk about landslides?

A landslide would cause a swell and not a pulse of energy? Right or Wrong?

The worry is the amount of water the landslide displaces, right?


So would a swell still travel at 500MPH from a landslide? Or just the energy from the landslide.



posted on Jan, 1 2005 @ 07:15 PM
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The swell is the visible part of the pulse of energy. Kind of like dropping a stone in a still pond. The water doesn't move but the energy moves outward or away from the stone. We see a pulse of energy. If you surf, your surfboard doesn't get pushed by a swell, you simply bob up and down. When the pulse or swell hits the bottom of the beach it begins to break and becomes a wave, you ride the wave.



posted on Jan, 1 2005 @ 07:24 PM
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But if you drop a boulder into a pond.

A wave wont form until the swell reaches the shore.

But you are saying that energy traveled to the beach and caused a wave before any swell reached the shores of Indonesia.



Sorry just curious. Or am I just wrong in saying a large boulder being dropped into a pond wont cause an instaneous wave.

Before this post ends I guarantee we will all be experts in wave science

JK.

[edit on 1-1-2005 by Ritual]



posted on Jan, 1 2005 @ 07:40 PM
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The water will splash up if you drop a bolder into the pond. The water spashes and drops back into the pond. A wave does not form but a pulse of energy moves away from the point of bolder impact and when it hits the edge of the pond a small wave will break on the shore.

BTW........most huge waves are formed by constant wind blowing across a large patch of water for a long period of time. The wind creates a pulse of energy which begins to consolidate to form pulses or swells. 50 foot waves are formed by storms hundreds maybe thousands of miles of away.


E_T

posted on Jan, 2 2005 @ 02:10 AM
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Originally posted by Ritual
But you are saying that energy traveled to the beach and caused a wave before any swell reached the shores of Indonesia.
No, it's just that water itself doesn't move, actually in open water waves watermolecules are moving in circle inside wave
Instead of travelling any longer distance themself they just push next molecules transferring energy to them.
www.teachnet.ie...

Now difference between normal waves and tsunamis is that normal waves "move" only surface (couple dekameters) water while in case of tsunami its whole ocean from surface to bottom which is "sloshing".
(instead of dropping small stone to bucket of water shake whole bucket)


In right conditions tsunami can rise very high, top result is From Lituya Bay, Alaska where earthquake caused landslide in other side of bay and tsunami which climbed half kilometer above sealevel when it hit mountainside on other side of bay. (because there just wasn't other place where it could have gone more easily)
www.usc.edu...


SMR

posted on Jan, 2 2005 @ 02:47 AM
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For those who would like all the available footage and images,check out www.waveofdestruction.org...
Updated hourly, sometimes every ten minutes with new content.



posted on Jan, 2 2005 @ 04:51 AM
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What struck me in the tsunami videos was not the size or speed of the wave, but the fact that once it hit land it didn't even slow down. It kept going and going and took everything with it. Scary stuff.


SMR

posted on Jan, 2 2005 @ 04:44 PM
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It was wierd to see the water continue to flow.It was if someone left the hose on and forgot about it.
In one of the hotel video's,it just kept coming and seemed to get stronger.
The images of before and after of the shore line are very creepy to look at.



posted on Jan, 2 2005 @ 05:19 PM
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Sorry you guys are wrong.


Goto any pond. Get a crane and put a boulder up over the middle of the pond. Drop the boulder into the water.

A wave will not happen on the shore until the ripple from the boulder hitting the water reaches the shore.

If it was an energy pulse that was causing the waves, then the wave would happen instanaseouly on the shore as soon as the boulder hit the water. Energy travels that fast.

I will hear no other explanation, besides a Tsunami was caused by either 1) An Asteroid 2) An underwater Earthquake that cause the seabed to crack and displace water.

In which case in both circumstances a tsunami would not form until the swells or ripples from the asteroid/seafloorcrack hit the shore.

Not some make beleive energy wave.

Concussion and energy are two different things.

Concussion is either sound or air rushing in. Conussion makes more sense to me then energy waves.







[edit on 2-1-2005 by Ritual]



posted on Jan, 2 2005 @ 06:43 PM
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Sorry, Ritual, but you just need to go and get a physics textbook, or one on tsunamis, from your local library. I'll try one more time: the tsunami is analogous to a sound wave. You know that the speed of sound is about 700 miles per hour, right? But is the air rushing past your head at 700mph every time you listen to something? Of course not. Its the sound waves that are moving through the air, not the air that's moving.

Your pond comparison is faulty. The boulder does push a lot of water aside, but what happens is that the molecules that are next to the boulder push against other molecules, which push against their neighbouring molecules, and so on in a chain reaction of pushing that finally reaches the shore.

Do us all a favour. Get a physics text book, or ask your teacher. My last comment on this.





 
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