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Anticipation grows at possibility of Tutankhamun tomb's hidden chambers

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posted on Sep, 29 2015 @ 09:35 AM
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Some people look at a picture and just see rocks or a stone wall this guy saw something else when he looked at pictures of king tut`s tomb.



Earlier this year, Reeves published a paper in which he claimed that the tomb of Tutankhamun, an 18th-Dynasty pharaoh who died around 1323 B.C., includes two doorways that were plastered and painted over.


In Reeves’s theory, these doorways are among several clues suggesting that the tomb was originally built for another ruler—Nefertiti, the principal wife of Akhenaten, who is believed to have fathered Tutankhamun with another wife.


Reeves first began developing his theory after studying laser scans of the tomb made by Factum Arte, a high-tech team of conservators and artists who built a precise replica of the tomb in Luxor.


As part of that project, which was completed earlier this year, Factum Arte posted all of its data online, including a series of scans that show the tomb’s walls in unprecedented detail. These scans reveal clear, straight lines that lie beneath the surface of the paint and plaster, suggesting the outlines of two doorways.

Nicholas Reeves said their investigations showed the tomb's ceiling extends behind the northern and western walls. He is now almost convinced his theory suggesting the existence of two undiscovered chambers is correct.

"After our first examination of the walls we can do nothing more until we receive the all-clear from the radar device to confirm the our findings," Reeves told Ahram Online.

Eldamaty has promised that on 4 November, the same day Tutankhamun's tomb was discovered, the radar results of scans on the two walls will be announced.


The big question is if his theory is proven correct what will they do next?

I think they should break the wall down.
It seems that TuT`s tomb is actually just part of a corridor.They just stuck him in the hallway when he died.





english.ahram.org.eg...
news.nationalgeographic.com...

edit on 29-9-2015 by Tardacus because: (no reason given)




posted on Sep, 29 2015 @ 09:39 AM
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a reply to: Tardacus

Is there a reason why it would take so long to get an 'all clear' (whatever that means) from whatever radar device they used?



posted on Sep, 29 2015 @ 09:47 AM
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a reply to: Tardacus

I don't know why but I immediately thought of Geraldo Rivera and Al Capone's vault.



posted on Sep, 29 2015 @ 09:49 AM
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Will this encourage the dreaded "Curse of King Tut's Tomb's Hidden Rooms"? Gulp, gish, geewhiz, gulp, and glumption.

edit on 29-9-2015 by Aleister because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 29 2015 @ 09:57 AM
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a reply to: Tardacus

Cool. S&f.
Another mystery figure enters the egyptology stage.
They hopefully get a yes for the radar.



posted on Sep, 29 2015 @ 11:09 AM
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a reply to: Tardacus


"After our first examination of the walls we can do nothing more until we receive the all-clear from the radar device to confirm the our findings," Reeves told Ahram Online.

Eldamaty has promised that on 4 November, the same day Tutankhamun's tomb was discovered, the radar results of scans on the two walls will be announced.

Can't wait. They've found other treasures in hidden chambers before, like boats. Ground Penetrative radar will show if theres empty spaces behind the wall or not.

Considering Tuts tomb was mostly preserved intact and all, this could be really, really… neat.

So far Tuts treasure stands at 7 tons(?) of gold, superseded by the priceless nature of all the artifacts from a bygone civilization.



posted on Sep, 29 2015 @ 11:34 AM
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Depends if the Egyptians let them break through the "doors". They have got very possessive over their archaeology lately



posted on Sep, 29 2015 @ 01:02 PM
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a reply to: Tardacus

I assume that they'll have to start with drilling and inserting small cameras if there is indeed something to look at. From there, who knows what they will do, but I assume that they'd try to preserve the portions of the walls that need removed as best they can, so it would probably be a long, slow, meticulous process to open up the rooms completely.



posted on Sep, 29 2015 @ 01:38 PM
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originally posted by: SlapMonkey
a reply to: Tardacus

I assume that they'll have to start with drilling and inserting small cameras if there is indeed something to look at. From there, who knows what they will do, but I assume that they'd try to preserve the portions of the walls that need removed as best they can, so it would probably be a long, slow, meticulous process to open up the rooms completely.



About two minutes with a sledge hammer...



posted on Sep, 29 2015 @ 03:23 PM
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As long as there aren't any murals or hieroglyphics on the walls I don't see why there should be a problem with knocking the wall down.

Cool find! I hope something in regards to Nefertiti or Akhenaten is found behind the walls.



posted on Sep, 29 2015 @ 04:11 PM
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originally posted by: asmall89
As long as there aren't any murals or hieroglyphics on the walls I don't see why there should be a problem with knocking the wall down. .

these are the walls in question




posted on Sep, 29 2015 @ 04:14 PM
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originally posted by: eluryh22
I don't know why but I immediately thought of Geraldo Rivera and Al Capone's vault.

Agreed. I foresee a lot of anticipation followed by the rooms being opened to reveal that they were cleaned out a long time ago and all that remains is a lot of dust and broken junk.

P.S. -- On the other hand, they left the stuff in King Tut's tomb, so maybe the hidden ones are untouched. I guess we'll find out in 20 years or so.
edit on 29-9-2015 by Blue Shift because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 29 2015 @ 04:17 PM
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I wonder when they will say that the slopes running down to the chambers was religious sacrifices; OOOOH DID I JUST TELL THAT!!!!!!!!



posted on Sep, 29 2015 @ 07:40 PM
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Well, i just watched the movie Stargate and...Stargate? A stargate in the other room?



posted on Sep, 30 2015 @ 07:53 PM
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originally posted by: Aleister
Will this encourage the dreaded "Curse of King Tut's Tomb's Hidden Rooms"? Gulp, gish, geewhiz, gulp, and glumption.

No way to tell.

It would be a hidden curse.

Harte



posted on Sep, 30 2015 @ 07:55 PM
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originally posted by: asmall89
As long as there aren't any murals or hieroglyphics on the walls I don't see why there should be a problem with knocking the wall down.


You never know what's on the other side of the wall, you see. Could be something fabulous decorating it.

Harte



posted on Oct, 22 2015 @ 07:25 PM
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Looks like it's been given the go ahead to use radar:

www.theguardian.com...



posted on Oct, 22 2015 @ 07:51 PM
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This is awsome!!

Forget the gold, I would love to hear it was a room of records. Things like that could destroy and create knowledge of ancient times. Maybe even help replace lost knowledge of the library.



posted on Oct, 23 2015 @ 06:41 AM
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a reply to: smirkley

I think they're more hypothesising that they could find Nefetiti's tomb (Tut's "step-mom"). Which as an unopened tomb could be just as illuminating about the the closing of the 18th Dynasty as any "hall of records". Even if it wasn't Nefetiti, I'm assuming it would be a room used by/for other royal members of the same family even if it was just more of Tutankhamen's own grave goods it would still be an amazing find.

Fingers crossed.



posted on Oct, 23 2015 @ 02:01 PM
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The big problem there is that there's no reason for Nefertiti to be buried in Tut's tomb.

Nefertiti participated in Akhenaten's destruction of the temples of Amun and attempt to eliminate the deity Amun (and all others) and replace it with the Aten. The Valley of the Kings (where Tut is) is dedicated to Amun, and tombs there have Amun as the chief deity. Tut's tomb itself has depictions and references to deities that Akhenaten (with Nefertiti) tried to erase.

Amarna's the more logical place for her to be buried. One of the first things that Akhenaten did when he founded Amarna was to declare it the burying place for himself and his family.




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