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Coydog

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posted on Sep, 26 2015 @ 05:46 AM
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So my dog woke me up at just after 2 a.m.
I go outside to see what's up.
A female coydog, a hybrid of coyote and domestic dog, trots up and wants to be my friend.
She is a beautiful animal.
I don't really want another dog.
I'll try to find her a good home.
She tried to be an Alpha against my dog and now she is limping on her front paw.
I am torn. Do I want the responsibility, or do I adopt her as a gift?
I'm watching her sleep at the moment, obviously exhausted, and her ears are scanning like a radar-dish.
I like that.




posted on Sep, 26 2015 @ 06:05 AM
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Awwww, why is she limping? Whether you keep her or find her a home, at least you are trying to help. How is your other dog getting along with it? Did you check her paw and leg to see why she is limping? I'm sure you must have. Does it look bad?
edit on 26-9-2015 by Night Star because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 26 2015 @ 06:08 AM
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originally posted by: skunkape23
I'll try to find her a good home.


That is the next best thing you can do if you are unable to accept the responsibility yourself.

Sometimes animals choose us and we have no control over that. If you can't love that baby, then find someone who can and you have served your purpose in her life. That alone should help you sleep better at night.




posted on Sep, 26 2015 @ 06:20 AM
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originally posted by: Night Star
Awwww, why is she limping? Whether you keep her or find her a home, at least you are trying to help. How is your other dog getting along with it? Did you check her paw and leg to see why she is limping? I'm sure you must have. Does it look bad?

She's limping because she nutted up against my dog, an Aussie-Lab mix, and got put in check the hard way.
There is a tense peace between them at the moment.
There is no blood. I think she just has a bruised ankle.



posted on Sep, 26 2015 @ 06:55 AM
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Is your dog a male? If so, they'd likely learn to get along quite well. Coydogs are brilliant, as well as the mix your dog is. If they're both young they could turn out to be the best of friends



posted on Sep, 26 2015 @ 07:07 AM
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originally posted by: snowspirit
Is your dog a male? If so, they'd likely learn to get along quite well. Coydogs are brilliant, as well as the mix your dog is. If they're both young they could turn out to be the best of friends

Both bitches.
They seem to have agreed to a truce, but it is uneasy.
If I give attention to either of them the other starts grumbling.



posted on Sep, 26 2015 @ 07:14 AM
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One of my biggest regrets was not adopting a stray kitten that wandered up to me on the street one day. I sent him to a good shelter that doesn't put animals down, but I still feel like I refused a precious gift, for reasons that were mostly selfish.
If I could do over, I'd take him back in a second.

For whatever my anecdotes worth to your situation.



posted on Sep, 26 2015 @ 07:42 AM
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originally posted by: skunkape23




If I give attention to either of them the other starts grumbling.


In my experince with dogs, some 20+ years, there will always be grumblings in the beginning. The dynamic of the "pack" has changed and it will take a little time and and a little bit of work from the alpha male (i.e. that's you) for things to settle. Of course, just like us humans, there are K9s that will never get along and if you should decide to keep you new friend you must keep your eyes at the situation and break things off at the first signs of trouble. Also, and I'm guessing you already know this - but I say it anyway, take your new friend to the vet and have her checked out! Better to be safe than sorry, even if things doesn't work out in the end.


edit on 9262015 by BobbyRock because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 26 2015 @ 08:37 AM
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a reply to: BobbyRock

'Funny how we'll take in a stray animal, but not a stray human.
Neither type of stray may be at fault, but we look at their situation starkly different.
Does the difference have to do with the character of the particular stray, ourselves. or simply the single fact of our perceived power over the one that is the lower animal? Is one merely victim of circumstance and other a seemingly self-made victim? Yes, I suppose that is what the difference is....



posted on Sep, 26 2015 @ 09:51 AM
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originally posted by: Aliensun
a reply to: BobbyRock

'Funny how we'll take in a stray animal, but not a stray human.
Neither type of stray may be at fault, but we look at their situation starkly different.
Does the difference have to do with the character of the particular stray, ourselves. or simply the single fact of our perceived power over the one that is the lower animal? Is one merely victim of circumstance and other a seemingly self-made victim? Yes, I suppose that is what the difference is....


I tried taking in a stray human once. Then the cops came and things got really awkward. They kept throwing around terms like "kidnapping" , "unethical cage" and asking weird questions like "Why do you need 40 bottles of lotion?".

It was a complete misunderstanding, what I thought was a homeless person was apparently a hipster on a walk. I mean what was i supposed to think with all the old clothes and unkempt beard and the Starbucks cup I mistook for a change cup. MY BAD your honor.

You know what they say, the road to hell is paved with good intentions. I will stick to helping animals next time.


edit on 9 26 2015 by SgtHamsandwich because: spelling



posted on Sep, 26 2015 @ 11:28 AM
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a reply to: SgtHamsandwich
Being a stray human, the cage was a good idea. Those humans, they'll try to kill you in your sleep if you're not careful.
Animals are more trustworthy.



posted on Sep, 26 2015 @ 02:35 PM
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My dog is licking the new one's injured ankle.
I think she is apologizing.
I believe the Alpha Is established and they seem to be getting along.



posted on Sep, 26 2015 @ 03:12 PM
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a reply to: skunkape23

Living in Maine in my younger days, that happened to me. I lived on a small farm, lots of animals and not to many neighbors. At the time I had 6 dogs already. I chose nothing, she did. I expected nothing and just treated her like one of the pack. She refused to come in the house, and opted to reside in the barn. At first I watched her closely, but relaxed after a few days. I even named her dog to differentiate, but not label her as our "pet".
Smartest dog I ever had, she chose me. She listened when I had to tell her something, but most of the time she knew what to do. Watched the property as if it was instinct. Never lost a single animal over those years.
A poacher shot her when she chased them out of the pasture.



posted on Sep, 28 2015 @ 04:16 PM
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a reply to: skunkape23

about 7 years ago I was awakened from a weekend nap by my youngest and oldest son arguing. I went to see what the argument was: my youngest son had brought in a puppy from outside and the oldest son was trying to talk sense into him. I checked out the pup, and marvelled at how cute it was. Solid and jet black weenie dog with a labradors head and this little pink tongue that stuck out. She was healthy and very robust, and was wearing a blue canvas collar.

I sent him out to see if it was a local dog from down the street, but no one claimed her. So we called animal control and they came out. When they saw her they said, "Awww, she's just a pup! Yeah, she won't last long out there. Distemper and parvo kill a lot of the puppies that come through".

With that our decision was made:



She is a bit older, a bit greyer....but she grabbed my heart. My sweet baby Sasha was sent into my life....it was meant to be.

On a side note: dogs tend to do better having a companion. If you only have 1 dog, having a 2nd one is an act of compassion. The elder dog will usually do the majority of the training of the new dog, helping them learn how to live with you.



posted on Sep, 28 2015 @ 10:11 PM
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a reply to: skunkape23

I'll try to find her a good home.

You are definitely a solid soul here.



posted on Sep, 30 2015 @ 12:09 AM
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She killed a copper head earlier.
I stepped out back to relieve myself and the dog darted in and took care of business.
I think I may keep her.



posted on Sep, 30 2015 @ 10:51 AM
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a reply to: skunkape23
I totally get that, I decided to keep my dog when he caught a Frisbee.



posted on Oct, 6 2015 @ 02:06 PM
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The elder dog will usually do the majority of the training of the new dog, helping them learn how to live with you.
a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan

We have so found this to be true. But bulldogs, at least in our case, are just so dang stubborn, they will teach some bad stuff, like not listening. He is awful. LOL but hubby loves him, so he gets to stay.


Hey OP? How is she working out? Did you keep her?



posted on Oct, 6 2015 @ 02:45 PM
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I'd recommend keeping her as well. The dog seems to have directly chosen you to be its friend. I'd take it into the vet, have it check out, just to be safe... On another hand since everyone is sharing stories.

Well, we had gone up to the mountains for camping. As we were walking through the mountains we saw a dog, seemed to be ditched. Lab, rot mix possibly. She was left with a gigantic sized dog food bag.
In the beginning she "hissed" and she growled. She eventually became comfortable enough around us to take her home that day.
We had another dog at home, also a lab, both female. Which really didn't go too well they were both trying to claim dominancy and territory. This dog we had found, was entirely trained, it knew no from yes, knew how to whisper, play fetch, and all those good tricks. From the looks of it, the dog was well loved and cared for even with being ditched. We assumed the person who left her was having financial issues and they had left her In hope she would be found.
At the time we found her the vet said she was eight or nine. She lived id say until she was sixteen or so with death being caused by a ruptured spleen or liver.

I strongly believe this dog chose you, now id say its time for you to choose her and give her that love she needs if you can. The experience could be worth your while. If you cannot take it, keep looking for a good place.



posted on Oct, 6 2015 @ 10:10 PM
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I found the owner...well actually the other way around.
It was a woman and her young son. They were overjoyed to be reunited.
She had left the animal at her parents house while she left town for a week.
The dog escaped the fence and I imagine went looking for them and ended up at my place.
I told her if she has to leave town again the dog can stay here.



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