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Growing Number Believe California’s Drought Is A Government Conspiracy

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posted on Sep, 25 2015 @ 11:32 AM
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I'm from California. We are in a draught. We have so many fires burning too because of it. Lake Shasta is insanely low and Lake Oroville. 80 percent of our creeks are dried up. So conspiracy it all you want, but it's inaccurate.




posted on Sep, 25 2015 @ 11:39 AM
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posted on Sep, 25 2015 @ 12:12 PM
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Whatever the deal is the US needs to start building at least one pipeline and we have some of the brightest engineers on the planet who really ought to be making it a priority to develop desalination technologies or at least share some hidden developments.

Or better yet collaborate with those who have little choice but to invest in research and development.

www.youtube.com..." target="_blank" class="postlink" rel="nofollow">https...://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FDRIZFjQ4yE


My money is on the USA, Israel and of course our other desert friends all collaborating on new solutions.

www.youtube.com...
edit on 25-9-2015 by stabstab because: (no reason given)

edit on 25-9-2015 by stabstab because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 25 2015 @ 12:15 PM
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a reply to: wasaka I will not support Dane Wigington on his prediction that a Global shockwave can occur. Most states in the world never play with nature and the environment because the two contribute to our good harmonius living as humans. Destroying the eco-systems or the environment often lead to problems like drought, starvation and sickness. How? Burning of forests reduce the emission of oxygen that we need, and most insects and birds for pollination of our fruit trees are killed. Probably this is the reason why the POPE is visiting USA with the message that the environment is important. California people always put fire on the forests and i hope they will learn.. The oxygen produced by the trees combine with hydrogen gas around to form the cloud for rain. No o2 , no rain..stephenca



posted on Sep, 25 2015 @ 05:51 PM
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a reply to: MrMasterMinder

This conspiracy in particular I doubt too at least until any information pops up, but never doubt the government, never consider any conspiracy too far out there as these are the same people who have time and time again throughout history have done the most insane things ever fathomed in the name of money or control
edit on 25-9-2015 by Telepathy3 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 25 2015 @ 06:05 PM
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originally posted by: Nexttimemaybe
I just don't understand what gain the government would have from stopping people in Cali getting water.

Surely destroying a large economy is not beneficial for government coffers.



I don't claim that it is a conspiracy, but if it were they wouldn't be destroying or losing economy, they would be doing this for a greater gain in a different area. Just how one chess piece is sacrificed for another thats more valuable. It's kinda like what they do with diamonds, the whole world thinks diamonds are some extremely rare item when in reality they are common and so the people that own the diamonds created an artificial rarity and caused them to be very expensive by withholding their supply of them. If people thought water was hard to come by and was a rare thing, it's value would raise



posted on Sep, 26 2015 @ 03:52 AM
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a reply to: MystikMushroom




Drinking expensive bottled water will be how you show someone how rich you are in the near future.

"I'm so rich I water my African violets with Dasani!"



It's already getting to be that way...back in VA, "artisan" water (no, not Artesian) was what all the cool, wealthy kids drank...at about $4.75 a 16oz bottle, more in certain "touristy" areas. I've been back in San Antonio for a week and it's like that here too...Voss is the uppity water of choice; although I have to admit, it's amazing tasting water and...I remember drinking both fresh rain water and water from a deep well in the Middle Eastern desert as a child and had never met their match until I sucked down that cold, $5.00 bottle of deliciousness the other day. It just oozes "swank" with the packaging too...but that price? Dayum!

It's all groovy though, because it's totally worth the scathing looks from ye olde soccer moms to know that I, with my $5.00 case of 20oz. bottles of generic, mineral-enhanced water will be getting 24 times more hydrated than those biatches will for the same price. Two words, my friends; "win" and "ning"


To the OP: I care very much what happens in Cali because it'll affect the entire West Coast as well, and I have many friends and relatives along that path whom I'd like to see avoid any harm. I spent many years of my life there too, and would be sad to see something bad befall such a beautiful place. As far as the possibility of the weather being manipulated? I'd say it is far more accurate to call it a probability. But it ain't just happening in Califas, I can assure you of that.

edit on 30553America/ChicagoSat, 26 Sep 2015 03:55:19 -050030am30268America/Chicago by tigertatzen because: ghost in the machine



posted on Sep, 26 2015 @ 11:05 AM
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a reply to: wasaka

I have proof of the city of La Verne draining millions of gallons of freshwater from Live Oak reservoir directly into the ocean 2 years ago.
edit on 26-9-2015 by Battlefresh because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 26 2015 @ 05:20 PM
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a reply to: Telepathy3




I don't claim that it is a conspiracy, but if it were they wouldn't be destroying or losing economy, they would be doing this for a greater gain in a different area. Just how one chess piece is sacrificed for another thats more valuable. It's kinda like what they do with diamonds, the whole world thinks diamonds are some extremely rare item when in reality they are common and so the people that own the diamonds created an artificial rarity and caused them to be very expensive by withholding their supply of them. If people thought water was hard to come by and was a rare thing, it's value would raise



Very well stated analogy there...that summed it up quite nicely.



posted on Sep, 26 2015 @ 05:23 PM
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a reply to: Battlefresh




I have proof of the city of La Verne draining millions of gallons of freshwater from Live Oak reservoir directly into the ocean 2 years ago.


Care to share it with us? I'd be curious to know what the justification was for that little project.



posted on Sep, 26 2015 @ 05:47 PM
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a reply to: randyvs




It may be more like Dane wiggerton.
If it weren't for all the water in the california aqueduct.


What is that supposed to mean? Why would you say something like that?



posted on Sep, 26 2015 @ 06:58 PM
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Ala reply to: tigertatzen
I pass by the aqueduct often want some pics?



posted on Sep, 26 2015 @ 09:31 PM
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a reply to: randyvs

Is there any water in it?

Last time I drove I-5 the San Joaquin aqueduct looked the same as always.

I remember the last California drought, which was back in the 1970's when rain puddles froze every winter. The droughts match up with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, cold means drought, warm means flood. In California the floods were in the 1950's and the 1980's. the drought were in the 2010's and the 1970's Match up is more complicated than that.

At the 1 hour plus a few minutes, Dr. Easterbrook shows the PDO





ETA-- make that 1:36:00
edit on 26-9-2015 by Semicollegiate because: had to watch for video cue

edit on 26-9-2015 by Semicollegiate because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 26 2015 @ 09:36 PM
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originally posted by: tigertatzen
a reply to: MystikMushroom




Drinking expensive bottled water will be how you show someone how rich you are in the near future.

"I'm so rich I water my African violets with Dasani!"



It's already getting to be that way...back in VA, "artisan" water (no, not Artesian) was what all the cool, wealthy kids drank...at about $4.75 a 16oz bottle, more in certain "touristy" areas. I've been back in San Antonio for a week and it's like that here too...Voss is the uppity water of choice; although I have to admit, it's amazing tasting water and...I remember drinking both fresh rain water and water from a deep well in the Middle Eastern desert as a child and had never met their match until I sucked down that cold, $5.00 bottle of deliciousness the other day. It just oozes "swank" with the packaging too...but that price? Dayum!

It's all groovy though, because it's totally worth the scathing looks from ye olde soccer moms to know that I, with my $5.00 case of 20oz. bottles of generic, mineral-enhanced water will be getting 24 times more hydrated than those biatches will for the same price. Two words, my friends; "win" and "ning"


To the OP: I care very much what happens in Cali because it'll affect the entire West Coast as well, and I have many friends and relatives along that path whom I'd like to see avoid any harm. I spent many years of my life there too, and would be sad to see something bad befall such a beautiful place. As far as the possibility of the weather being manipulated? I'd say it is far more accurate to call it a probability. But it ain't just happening in Califas, I can assure you of that.


I like Crystal Geyser Water out of the Owens Valley in California. It cost a dollar a gallon most places in the western US.

I cook with it and the leftovers last for months.



posted on Sep, 26 2015 @ 09:45 PM
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a reply to: Semicollegiate




I like Crystal Geyser Water out of the Owens Valley in California. It cost a dollar a gallon most places in the western US.

I cook with it and the leftovers last for months.


Hmmm...is formaldehyde one of the ingredients?
I think I'll avoid that brand just to be safe



posted on Sep, 26 2015 @ 09:52 PM
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a reply to: randyvs

Sure, post them if they illustrate your statement. I'm sure others would be interested to see what you mean, and its relevance to the topic, too. Just rather shocking to see something like that inserted into a thread about possible government-induced drought...and I'm sure it was not a typo either.



posted on Sep, 26 2015 @ 10:03 PM
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originally posted by: tigertatzen
a reply to: Semicollegiate




I like Crystal Geyser Water out of the Owens Valley in California. It cost a dollar a gallon most places in the western US.

I cook with it and the leftovers last for months.


Hmmm...is formaldehyde one of the ingredients?
I think I'll avoid that brand just to be safe




Formaldehyde costs extra, $5 a shot and a few hours in brain tissue to create it. I get the sans Fluorine, I think. The only other choice is city filtered water, which might be great, but Fluorine is very hard to remove, because F is the smallest atom, except for hydrogen.

What is the criterion for Formaldehyde in bottled water? I've heard of Bisphenol Estrogen from the plastic.

Tap water leftovers rarely last more than a week. 3 days usually, and the bolted water cooking tastes better too.



posted on Sep, 26 2015 @ 10:23 PM
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a reply to: Semicollegiate




Formaldehyde costs extra, $5 a shot and a few hours in brain tissue to create it. I get the sans Fluorine, I think. The only other choice is city filtered water, which might be great, but Fluorine is very hard to remove, because F is the smallest atom, except for hydrogen.

What is the criterion for Formaldehyde in bottled water? I've heard of Bisphenol Estrogen from the plastic.

Tap water leftovers rarely last more than a week. 3 days usually, and the bolted water cooking tastes better too.



Eeeeek! $5 a shot for formaldehyde...that's a bit too rich for my blood. Although the BE probably does the trick quite nicely on its own.
I wonder if anti-aging properties have been observed, since leftovers gain such longevity. Untapped market? Pardon the pun...


I never drink or cook with tap water...especially where I'm currently living. It is extremely "hard" water and contains lime deposits, despite the city filtering, that have been linked to numerous health issues. I do have to say though, it looks less cloudy since they banned fluoridization of the water supply. Still, I'd have to be mighty thirsty and desperate to ingest a glass of it. The taste makes me gag...it is truly horrid.

We get considerable droughts here too and have strictly enforced codes on water use. Yet, it is a strangely common sight at night, when the day walkers are bedded down for the evening, to see fire hydrants all over the city (and it's a huge city) with their valves wide open (open, not broken like they've been hit by a car, this is deliberate) and geysers of water gushing out into the street when we're supposedly having a shortage. Used to kid around about it being some cruel city government joke...not anymore though. Now I really want to know why, because it's eerily like some of the descriptions from posters here in other areas.



posted on Sep, 26 2015 @ 10:50 PM
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Good conspiracies are invisible. The fire hydrant orgy is so overt that it must have a reason.

A government conspiracy would be passing a law, or making some assignment of free time and scarce resources, that looks harmless and nice but bites and chokes when the bad times come.



posted on Sep, 26 2015 @ 11:09 PM
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a reply to: tigertatzen

The last place I lived had water so bad that it would form a pancake sized glob on top of a pot of boiling water.

I made a still out of copper tubing and a pressure cooker and discovered that burning free stove gas I could make about one cup of distilled water an hour.

Maybe the same rate of distillation could be got from sunshine and mirrors, or aluminum foil.




edit on 26-9-2015 by Semicollegiate because: (no reason given)



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