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Man most likely evolved from a Virus

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posted on Sep, 22 2015 @ 05:37 AM
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Great concept for a thread and does help explain a few things. It also helps all the annunaki crowd make sense of it all.

Few questions... can a virus force us to evolve by losing 2 chromosomes ?

Is their a known virus that attacks the production of hair folecules? Could help explain that part of humans evolution...

Could a virus affect thumb, spinal and cranium structures. Could a virus cause brain swelling that increased the cranium size for a few generations, rather than 100,000 years of evolution.

I know they are fanciful questions but until this question was proposed I never thought along these lines. I know the basics of evolution but not the role of viruses in this process, so please no personal attacks on these food for thought questions.




posted on Sep, 22 2015 @ 05:38 AM
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a reply to: Agartha
Cheers for the info and links



posted on Sep, 22 2015 @ 05:58 AM
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originally posted by: NoCorruptionAllowed
a reply to: Raevynn

"Danger Live Virus samples enclosed"

I have seen labels in bio labs that are just like this, so, apparently the government and professionally credentialed types sure think Virus's are living.
Does it have to be advanced like mammals to be considered life? Not to people who work with them.

They use live virus to make vaccines also, at least that is what they say


A virus, as others here have pointed out, lacks the reproductive machinery to procreate. Viruses harness the machinery of a bacteria, or any cell which they can infect, to reproduce.

There are RNA and DNA viruses. DNA viruses have only one strand. There's a whole classification system for viruses if you look it up.

I don't know where you got that label from, but a virus can be dangerous if it's of an infective type that can kill a human or animal. Most viruses disintegrate when exposed to air. However, some viruses like Hep C have been known to survive for long periods of time suggesting that they might have mutated.

Vaccines are made from attenuated viruses i.e. their infectivity is reduced. So when you get a vaccination and you are then exposed to the virus someplace in the environment, the immune system kicks in to produce antibodies which protect the person from the disease. That's the theory anyway.

It's a good question why nature produced viruses. If you ever watched their mechanism of infection in a video, it's like something out of science fiction. Even their shapes look like some alien species.


edit on 22-9-2015 by Phantom423 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 22 2015 @ 07:11 AM
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a reply to: SPECULUM

First off, the missing link doesn't exist. It is a fallacy. Second, everything contributes in some way to altering our DNA, viruses included.



posted on Sep, 22 2015 @ 07:43 AM
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Hmm, when we consider the origins of life, not to get into a debate so dont lol, we know that simple life evolved in combination with other simple life, all performing different roles in the 'creature' - look at coral. Or the Manowar jelly Fish. A collection of individual life, acting together as a whole.

The benefit is they all survive with more chance, given they can perform various roles, from self defence to predatory behaviour. Even other individual animals are known to coexist symbiotically with larger animals, cleaning them of parasites and in return being protected from prey.

The human body has more bacteria in it than actual human cells. We are in essence, a colony of structures operating in unison to give us the illusion of a single life.

Even out stomach has a nervous system, the enteric nervous system. But if a complex form of life such as humans, did not have the illusion of being a singular entity, we'd never have survived. it makes sense to have a single, environmentally aware organ that says "Danger, Run!" "Hunger, Eat!" "Purty.. hankypanky!" and "Where's the toilet?".. to be aware of it's own 'colony' only by our evolved complex nervous system.

In terms of a virus leading to us developing intelligence.it cannot be written off, something different happened with homo sapiens sapiens, and it led us to become destroyers of our planet. I tend to think, thought, necessity caused our evolution. But we've now evolved to the point we rely on the artificial world we've created and that can be taken away from us any time mother earth wants to...



posted on Sep, 22 2015 @ 08:10 AM
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a reply to: randyvs

ssshh, don't you know you never mention,pond scum, abiogenesis and evolution together. their not the same.



posted on Sep, 22 2015 @ 11:13 AM
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originally posted by: hounddoghowlie
a reply to: randyvs

ssshh, don't you know you never mention,pond scum, abiogenesis and evolution together. their not the same.


Whoopths!



posted on Sep, 22 2015 @ 01:56 PM
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originally posted by: hounddoghowlie
a reply to: randyvs

ssshh, don't you know you never mention,pond scum, abiogenesis and evolution together. their not the same.


Even though you are being sarcastic, you are right. Mentioning them together is useless because they don't share any known common mechanisms. Unless you can provide them perhaps?



posted on Sep, 22 2015 @ 02:16 PM
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Look, all i'm saying is that through some unknown virus hosted by " ? " Apes Evolved

Viruses have played key roles in literally all life "Wherever" and had it not been for said viruses, life as we know it wouldn't be or be the same.



posted on Sep, 22 2015 @ 02:24 PM
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originally posted by: Phantom423

originally posted by: NoCorruptionAllowed
a reply to: Raevynn

"Danger Live Virus samples enclosed"

I have seen labels in bio labs that are just like this, so, apparently the government and professionally credentialed types sure think Virus's are living.
Does it have to be advanced like mammals to be considered life? Not to people who work with them.

They use live virus to make vaccines also, at least that is what they say


A virus, as others here have pointed out, lacks the reproductive machinery to procreate. Viruses harness the machinery of a bacteria, or any cell which they can infect, to reproduce.

There are RNA and DNA viruses. DNA viruses have only one strand. There's a whole classification system for viruses if you look it up.

I don't know where you got that label from, but a virus can be dangerous if it's of an infective type that can kill a human or animal. Most viruses disintegrate when exposed to air. However, some viruses like Hep C have been known to survive for long periods of time suggesting that they might have mutated.

Vaccines are made from attenuated viruses i.e. their infectivity is reduced. So when you get a vaccination and you are then exposed to the virus someplace in the environment, the immune system kicks in to produce antibodies which protect the person from the disease. That's the theory anyway.

It's a good question why nature produced viruses. If you ever watched their mechanism of infection in a video, it's like something out of science fiction. Even their shapes look like some alien species.

Viruses have survived for billions of years just in the soil, permafrost and elsewhere, without a host. So the question is, where do they come from, how did they come to be, and for what purpose ? Which came first, the virus or the Egg?



posted on Sep, 22 2015 @ 02:56 PM
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a reply to: Kharron

Actually the OP has a point biologically speaking. Viruses aren't the missing link in the sense of common ancestry but may have inserted DNA or changed our genetic code in the past. There is actual research which suggests contact with viruses can alter gene expression or potentially add new genes. At the very least, however, cohabitation with viruses has been a sort of selection pressure and certainly has had an effect on human evolution.

Viruses, while they do not fit the definition life, DO have genetic information and can drive evolution.

The bacteria and viruses in your body outnumber your body's actual cells by a massive amount.

Google Scholar: The Role of Viruses in Human Evolution



posted on Sep, 22 2015 @ 04:35 PM
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a reply to: SPECULUM

I have previously proposed that DNA could be carried from one species, to another, via a retroviral agent.

The virus carries its own RNA segment but can pick up "junk DNA" sequences in the replication process.

This is the natural equivalent of what we do in the lab when we genetically engineer traits across species.

It could also explain the sudden appearance of complex and apparently fully evolved 'new' traits.

But it walks all over the gradualism of the Evolutionary Synthesis.



posted on Sep, 22 2015 @ 04:38 PM
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Someone may have already said this, but viruses could not have been the first "life" form. They rely on the host cell's reproductive machinery to replicate, so without a cell to infect, viruses are sterile.

If viruses were part of the proposed evolutionary lineage, we would see common capsids (viral shells) in our cells, like we do with mitochondria.
edit on 22-9-2015 by cooperton because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 22 2015 @ 05:51 PM
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originally posted by: SPECULUM

originally posted by: Phantom423

originally posted by: NoCorruptionAllowed
a reply to: Raevynn

"Danger Live Virus samples enclosed"

I have seen labels in bio labs that are just like this, so, apparently the government and professionally credentialed types sure think Virus's are living.
Does it have to be advanced like mammals to be considered life? Not to people who work with them.

They use live virus to make vaccines also, at least that is what they say


A virus, as others here have pointed out, lacks the reproductive machinery to procreate. Viruses harness the machinery of a bacteria, or any cell which they can infect, to reproduce.

There are RNA and DNA viruses. DNA viruses have only one strand. There's a whole classification system for viruses if you look it up.

I don't know where you got that label from, but a virus can be dangerous if it's of an infective type that can kill a human or animal. Most viruses disintegrate when exposed to air. However, some viruses like Hep C have been known to survive for long periods of time suggesting that they might have mutated.

Vaccines are made from attenuated viruses i.e. their infectivity is reduced. So when you get a vaccination and you are then exposed to the virus someplace in the environment, the immune system kicks in to produce antibodies which protect the person from the disease. That's the theory anyway.

It's a good question why nature produced viruses. If you ever watched their mechanism of infection in a video, it's like something out of science fiction. Even their shapes look like some alien species.

Viruses have survived for billions of years just in the soil, permafrost and elsewhere, without a host. So the question is, where do they come from, how did they come to be, and for what purpose ? Which came first, the virus or the Egg?


Virii consist of an RNA sequence. To replicate, they must be hosted by something with a full DNA mechanism. They will eventually degrade and become non-functional. They do not last except under very specific circumstances. It is because hosts are everywhere (life is ubiquitous within the Earth's environments) that they persist.



posted on Sep, 22 2015 @ 08:51 PM
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originally posted by: Agartha

originally posted by: Belcastro

O.o

how did people give birth before the virus DNA was apart of us if thats whats responsible for mothers and children to be attached in the womb?


That was hundreds of millions before us, in fact syncytin has been found in other mammalians (like cats and dogs for example, which shows the virus infected a shared ancestor).

Scientists now think this retrovirus facilitated the evolution of mammalian placenta, which, as we know, protects the embryo from the mother's immune system and allows it to feed of its mother. By the time the placenta evolved there were many retroviruses that had integrated to the genomes of those earlier ancestors. One of those genes produces syncytin which has been shown to play an essential role in placental development.

In simple words: an accidental infection of an ancestor by a virus was responsible for the evolution of a new mechanism of reproduction, which ended in a placental mammals... including us.

Isn't that just amazing?


Two articles regarding the above:
www.sciencedirect.com...
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov...


how were the mammals able to reproduce if that virus genetic material is responsible for mothers attaching to their children in the womb? would a common ancestor have had to of been infected with the virus before the evolution of mammals?



posted on Sep, 22 2015 @ 11:15 PM
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originally posted by: Belcastro

originally posted by: Agartha

originally posted by: Belcastro

O.o

how did people give birth before the virus DNA was apart of us if thats whats responsible for mothers and children to be attached in the womb?


That was hundreds of millions before us, in fact syncytin has been found in other mammalians (like cats and dogs for example, which shows the virus infected a shared ancestor).

Scientists now think this retrovirus facilitated the evolution of mammalian placenta, which, as we know, protects the embryo from the mother's immune system and allows it to feed of its mother. By the time the placenta evolved there were many retroviruses that had integrated to the genomes of those earlier ancestors. One of those genes produces syncytin which has been shown to play an essential role in placental development.

In simple words: an accidental infection of an ancestor by a virus was responsible for the evolution of a new mechanism of reproduction, which ended in a placental mammals... including us.

Isn't that just amazing?


Two articles regarding the above:
www.sciencedirect.com...
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov...


how were the mammals able to reproduce if that virus genetic material is responsible for mothers attaching to their children in the womb? would a common ancestor have had to of been infected with the virus before the evolution of mammals?
Yes



posted on Sep, 22 2015 @ 11:17 PM
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a reply to: SPECULUM

Just man? Clearly all life evolved from a common source (the genetics prove this), thus that title is a tad humanocentric



posted on Sep, 22 2015 @ 11:19 PM
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Sounds about right for how we treat each other and the earth.

Anyway being more serious wasn't this kind of the idea? Only we didn't say virus at first but more like a microorganism that simply mutated and then continued and became the building block for life?



posted on Sep, 22 2015 @ 11:23 PM
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originally posted by: Noinden
a reply to: SPECULUM

Just man? Clearly all life evolved from a common source (the genetics prove this), thus that title is a tad humanocentric
Well, the conversation was About Man, But



posted on Sep, 22 2015 @ 11:28 PM
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a reply to: SPECULUM

Unless you want to combine evolution and creationism, when you go back far enough we evolved from the same place. The evolution of life is a very interesting study, and the best evidence is that yes we started out as something akin to a virus. The problem is by definition life really did not start until it was self-sustaining, and that is not Viruses, they need other life forms to replicate. But no this is not a new idea, just as it is thought that RNA was the possible precursor to DNA, but life moved to mostly DNA-based information storage as it is more stable.



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