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Atoms and The Unknown

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posted on Sep, 21 2015 @ 12:30 AM
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The atom, itself, is unique. It has it's own cliché, charge, mode, energy, etc. I know the multitudes of microscopes to examine prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Just to clarify another thing, I understand about positive, negative, and acid-fast staining techniques. If you are unfamiliar with these techniques here are a couple of links briefly describing them. Gram Staining Acid-fast Staining

My question to you guys is do you believe that some parts of an atom that are there that we can still be missing or not seeing? Also, are there certain staining techniques that have been undiscovered?

Much love,

EF




posted on Sep, 21 2015 @ 12:41 AM
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a reply to: ExternalForces

Hi, i dont know much of these things, but i can imagine, in a scale that small, that some sort of quantum things may be happening,
like things existing and not existing in this and that place, all at the same time, finding and observing these would be tricky..
My 2cents..

So yes, i believe that we are missing bits and pieces.
edit on 21-9-2015 by solve because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 21 2015 @ 12:42 AM
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a reply to: ExternalForces

Not sure if you are talking about atoms or cells.

Atoms are very much smaller than cells and, for the most part, cannot be seen under a microscope or 'stained'.

Cells, however are made of hundreds of thousands of atoms or more. They can be seen under microscopes and staining is a way to enhance the visibility of certain features.

There may be parts of atoms that we know nothing about. That is why we need things like the LHC, to break them apart and see how they work.


edit on 21/9/2015 by chr0naut because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 21 2015 @ 01:13 AM
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a reply to: chr0naut

Sorry, I'm still improving on my writing skills but I was referring to both.

Just know that atoms are required to make up cells is the only reason I was referring to them.

Is finding new chemical compounds within an atom still extremely difficult or has the technology advanced beyond some of the standard knowledge to an average person?



posted on Sep, 21 2015 @ 01:14 AM
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a reply to: solve

Are you referring to chemical compound mechanics or atom mechanics?



posted on Sep, 21 2015 @ 01:42 AM
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originally posted by: ExternalForces
a reply to: chr0naut

Sorry, I'm still improving on my writing skills but I was referring to both.

Just know that atoms are required to make up cells is the only reason I was referring to them.

Is finding new chemical compounds within an atom still extremely difficult or has the technology advanced beyond some of the standard knowledge to an average person?



Your being very confusing there are no chemical compounds in an atom. To look into an atom we use something called electron scattering. Basically we shoot electrons at an atom. Most of it being empty space they pass right through. But occasionally they hit something when the my do we see the path change. Now could something unknown be in an atom id have to say probably not.

en.m.wikipedia.org...



posted on Sep, 21 2015 @ 01:45 AM
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a reply to: dragonridr

How are there no chemical compounds in an atom? You don't consider protons, neutrons, and electrons chemical compounds of life? Need I forget to mention, Ions.



posted on Sep, 21 2015 @ 01:45 AM
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a reply to: dragonridr

By the way wikapedia is a very unreliable source for information.



posted on Sep, 21 2015 @ 02:03 AM
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originally posted by: ExternalForces
a reply to: dragonridr
How are there no chemical compounds in an atom? You don't consider protons, neutrons, and electrons chemical compounds of life? Need I forget to mention, Ions.

I suggest studying harder in science class.

A "chemical compound" is made up of many atoms. An ion is a particle with extra positive or negative charge. An atom is made up neutrons, electrons, and protons. A cell is made up of many, many chemical compounds, and is a part of a living organism. You cannot interchange these terms.
edit on 21-9-2015 by AshOnMyTomatoes because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 21 2015 @ 02:11 AM
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originally posted by: ExternalForces
a reply to: dragonridr

By the way wikapedia is a very unreliable source for information.



Not for electron scattering it's very common in physics in fact have done it myself for students in Atomic and Molecular Physics. If your questioning the source you really need to do some research I chose that because it's a very basic description. Since you were having problems grasping the concept didn't think including papers from say Robert Hofstadter would help you.



posted on Sep, 21 2015 @ 02:12 AM
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a reply to: AshOnMyTomatoes

I would have to agree to disagree with you. Why do you suggest I study my science harder when you haven't even clarified your skills in your science foundations?

Denying that protons, neutrons, and ions aren't chemical compounds that form an atom we need to take them out of the class "Chemistry" then.



posted on Sep, 21 2015 @ 02:14 AM
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a reply to: dragonridr

Sorry my university taught me not to rely on wikapedia a reliable source. Actually, I'm pretty sure we aren't even permitted to use it as a citation while writing papers.



posted on Sep, 21 2015 @ 02:24 AM
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originally posted by: ExternalForces
a reply to: dragonridr

How are there no chemical compounds in an atom? You don't consider protons, neutrons, and electrons chemical compounds of life? Need I forget to mention, Ions.



Saved this for last you are so far off base. An electron is what's considered a point particle. Has nothing and I mean nothing to do with chemicals. Chemicalsc an be made up of thousands of atoms. Cells millions of atoms now your question was about an atom. See chemicals are made of atoms let's take something simple water two oxygen and one hydrogen atom. So what's in an oxygen 8 protons 8 neutrons and 8 electrons. Using this we can now what oxygen can bind it's electrons to.. The reason you discuss atoms is they are the building blocks of matter or in this case chemical compounds.
edit on 9/21/15 by dragonridr because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 21 2015 @ 02:30 AM
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a reply to: dragonridr

you mean a chemical point particle. I don't care what you say, it is a chemical. It has the ability to change it's surroundings, therefore it is a chemical.



posted on Sep, 21 2015 @ 02:36 AM
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originally posted by: ExternalForces
a reply to: dragonridr

you mean a chemical point particle. I don't care what you say, it is a chemical. It has the ability to change it's surroundings, therefore it is a chemical.



Ok you need to sit down with your professor your heading down the wrong path. Tell him to show you Compendium of Chemical Terminology also called the Gold Book. As a technical term, chemical substance refers to any form of matter—solid, liquid, or gas—that has constant chemical composition of its component atoms. Notice the last line chemicals are composed of atoms the two are not the same. You are composed of atoms everything around you is composed of atoms. Now we can break down matter into its chemical parts and then we can break that down to its atomic parys parts.

You can use the same techniques for a chemical on an atom there just to small.
edit on 9/21/15 by dragonridr because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 21 2015 @ 02:43 AM
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Not only the atom but the fabric of space and the method of the forces.

The fundamental forces are field forces. A field force has some thing like a built in charge detector, in addition to its force out of nowhere.

Atoms seem to be perpetual motion machines.



posted on Sep, 21 2015 @ 02:47 AM
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a reply to: dragonridr

No thanks. I understand what you are saying, but I still disagree. I'm pretty sure I'm happy with the A I have in Microbiology and not going to let your opinion change that. Thanks for your opinion though.



posted on Sep, 21 2015 @ 02:47 AM
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originally posted by: Semicollegiate
Not only the atom but the fabric of space and the method of the forces.

The fundamental forces are field forces. A field force has some thing like a built in charge detector, in addition to its force out of nowhere.

Atoms seem to be perpetual motion machines.




Well no there is always trade offs and if course atoms have decay rates to reach its ground state. All atoms will eventually reach there lowest energy level.



posted on Sep, 21 2015 @ 02:48 AM
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a reply to: Semicollegiate

Both positive motion and negative motion, correct. Do we have a way to manipulate these atoms to do so? I'm sure the Atom Particle Collision System is working on this as we speak. Just wish I could be there, you know?



posted on Sep, 21 2015 @ 02:49 AM
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a reply to: dragonridr

Does it then convert into negative energy or stay neutral? Does it depend on the atom itself? or the forces around it? I think both.



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