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The Huarochiri Manuscript

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posted on Sep, 20 2015 @ 06:09 PM
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If someone shared this one, it probably was long time ago. Anyway..., after a quick reference about this document, I'd like to quote 2 specific parts of it.

The first one could be considered the Andean version of Noah or Gilgamesh. The second part describes a cosmic event and how the land remained in darkness for five days.




The manuscript, which is of exceptional value for the understanding of the Andean culture, was written entirely in Quechua language in the early seventeenth century and has become the most important and complete testimony about religion, traditions, rituals and belief in the central Andes before the Spanish domination and even Inca.


The Huarochiri Manuscripts were published in German by Hermann Trimborn in 1939 and in Latin in 1942. Its first Spanish translation was made by José María Arguedas and edited by 1966 with the name "Gods and Men of Huarochiri" (the document didn't have a name). The original is held by the National Museum of History and the Institute of Peruvian Studies.

(RAW TRANSLATIONS).


CHAPTER III
"What Happened to the Indians When the Sea Blew out"

In this part we go back to the stories that old men tell.

What they have is as follows: in ancient times the world was in danger of disappearing. A male llama grazing on a mountain with excellent grass, knew that Mother Lake [the sea] had wanted [and decided] overflow, falling like waterfall. This calls saddened; He complained: "IN", saying wept and would not eat. The owner called, very angry, hit him with a cob of corn: "Come, dog, 'he said, you rest on the best grass". Then the flame, talking like a man, he said: "Be very aware and remember what I tell you: now, in five days, the large lake has arrived and everyone will end" and said , speaking. And the owner was shocked; he believed. "We will go anywhere to escape to the mountain Let Huillcacoto, there we have to save us. Take food for five days," he ordered, he said. And so, from that moment, the man started walking, carrying his family and flame. When I was about to reach the hill Huillcacoto, he found that all animals were gathered: the puma, fox, guanaco, condor, all species of animals. And the man had just arrived, the water began to fall in cataracts; then there, pressing a lot, men and animals were everywhere, on the hill of Huillcacoto, in a small space, just at the tip, where the water could not reach. But the water managed to touch the tip of the tail and dipped fox; so it was blackened. Five days were fulfilled, the water began to descend, dried; and the dry grew; the sea retreated more and removed and dried killed all the men. Only that mountain and lived with him again increased the people, and the man there for him today. And we bless this story now; Christians bless this time of the flood, as they tell and how blessed were saved in the mountains Huillcacoto.

 



CHAPTER IV

"As the sun disappeared five days"

And now we're going to count as died the day

In ancient times they say the sun died. And the sun died, became night for five days. Stones, then, beat among themselves against each other; since the so-called mortars, it ie the muchcas, and the mills were formed. The men began to eat those things; the flames of the hills and began to follow the man. And this, now we bless Christians saying, "Maybe nightfall the world because of the death of our mighty Lord Jesus Christ." And you may as well have been.


www.elpopular.pe...
americaindigena.com...
blog.pucp.edu.pe...
kuprienko.info...
gupea.ub.gu.se...
edit on 20-9-2015 by Trueman because: (no reason given)




posted on Sep, 20 2015 @ 07:04 PM
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has become the most important and complete testimony about religion, traditions, rituals and belief in the central Andes before the Spanish domination and even Inca.

except, it mentions Christianity all the way through
Same as the book of the Maya, which was written by a Christian



posted on Sep, 20 2015 @ 07:16 PM
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a reply to: Marduk

The original text is in quechua, someone converted wrote it. It doesn't need to be a bad thing.



posted on Sep, 20 2015 @ 07:33 PM
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thank you for posting this....

an other flood and fire story...to add to others......

the more the better as far as i'm concerned......a reply to: Trueman



posted on Sep, 20 2015 @ 09:04 PM
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originally posted by: Trueman
a reply to: Marduk

The original text is in quechua, someone converted wrote it..

Obviously


It doesn't need to be a bad thing.


Both examples are heavily influenced by the Bible. In the first the man is saved from a flood by a mountain top and in the second there was darkness surrounding the crucifixion
Neither of these events happened outside the Biblical narrative




It was now about noon, and darkness came over the whole land [or, earth] until three in the afternoon, while the sun's light failed [or, the sun was eclipsed]; and the curtain of the temple was torn in two

There has never been an eclipse during Passover (The time of the crucifixion)
en.wikipedia.org...


The book of the Maya (Popul Vuh) was also written in Quiche (Mayan), with a Spanish translation by Dominican friar Francisco Ximénez.. The Spanish missionaries were bilingual. Its hard to convert with sign language




posted on Sep, 21 2015 @ 03:04 AM
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a reply to: Marduk

I don't understand what you're trying to say.

The manuscript is not valid because it has similar stories to the bible?



posted on Sep, 21 2015 @ 04:08 AM
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originally posted by: Trueman
a reply to: Marduk

I don't understand what you're trying to say.

The manuscript is not valid because it has similar stories to the bible?


I think what Marduk was saying is that it is valid, but only as a means by which to demonstrate how the Roman Catholic writer did not "translate", they reinterpreted them as a means of assimilating their beliefs with those they sought to convert to Christianity. It transforms and distorts the native beliefs into a basis for Christianity. There are similarities and we can study those from more honest translations of the available pre-conquest corpus in some regions, these also further highlight the distortions that were able to persist because of the post-Conquest Christianisation and subsequent attempts to crush the native beliefs.

I still find it useful and historically valid from that stand point, so many thanks for posting it, and star and flag from me.
edit on 21-9-2015 by Anaana because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 21 2015 @ 04:53 AM
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a reply to: Trueman

In the northern hemissphere the sun doesnt go up for a few months i think, could it be the same, i mean the sun "stays" in the same place for three days under the x-mas. Move a bit further and it could happen



posted on Sep, 21 2015 @ 06:27 AM
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a reply to: Anaana

I see. Thanks for clarifying that. Well..., I believe there's another similar story from a precolumbian culture. I'll try check that later at home.



posted on Sep, 21 2015 @ 07:52 AM
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originally posted by: Anaana

I think what Marduk was saying is that it is valid, but only as a means by which to demonstrate how the Roman Catholic writer did not "translate", they reinterpreted them as a means of assimilating their beliefs with those they sought to convert to Christianity. It transforms and distorts the native beliefs into a basis for Christianity.


That's it exactly, thankyou





originally posted by: Trueman
a reply to: Anaana

I see. Thanks for clarifying that. Well..., I believe there's another similar story from a precolumbian culture. I'll try check that later at home.


The Popul Vuh
www.sacred-texts.com...



Over a universe wrapped in the gloom of a dense and primeval night passed the god Hurakan, the mighty wind. He called out "earth," and the solid land appeared. The chief gods took counsel; they were Hurakan, Gucumatz, the serpent covered with green feathers, and Xpiyacoc and Xmucane, the mother and father gods. As the result of their deliberations animals were created. But as yet man was not.




posted on Sep, 21 2015 @ 11:18 AM
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Funny how in all these flood stories only one or two people in the whole world are smart enough to get on a boat.



posted on Sep, 21 2015 @ 11:55 AM
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originally posted by: Blue Shift
Funny how in all these flood stories only one or two people in the whole world are smart enough to get on a boat.


That's always the part that I find hard to believe.



posted on Sep, 22 2015 @ 05:05 AM
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originally posted by: Trueman

originally posted by: Blue Shift
Funny how in all these flood stories only one or two people in the whole world are smart enough to get on a boat.


That's always the part that I find hard to believe.


It sometimes useful to use Katrina as a model for comparison despite the obvious differences. They're all told that danger is imminent, but some are more bound to place than others and choose to wait it out, and hope it's not as bad as expected, until it's too late to do anything about it.

The stories simply hail the successful act of faith.



posted on Sep, 22 2015 @ 05:33 AM
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originally posted by: Blue Shift
Funny how in all these flood stories only one or two people in the whole world are smart enough to get on a boat.


Simple metaphor which will almost uncertainly be used to described the next event to our future kin.

A few people saw the earth changes and took heed, others simply went about there business and got caught in the storm.



posted on Sep, 22 2015 @ 12:07 PM
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a reply to: Anaana

According to me, in all these stories, the animals seem to be smarter than humans.




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