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Bernie Sanders seeks to ban private prisons

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posted on Sep, 18 2015 @ 11:29 AM
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edit on 18-9-2015 by Realtruth because: (no reason given)




posted on Sep, 18 2015 @ 11:47 AM
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a reply to: MystikMushroom

MM you are not only correct in your assessment that the total number of prisoners needs lowering, in fact Mr Sanders is of the same mind.


With this bill, Sanders is further positioning himself as one of the staunchest proponents of criminal — and racial — justice in the presidential race, setting himself apart from Democratic and Republican candidates alike.

Facing mounting pressure from Black Lives Matter activists, who interrupted two of his press events this summer, Sanders unveiled a comprehensive racial justice platform in August, emphasizing state-sanctioned violence against communities of color and specific policies to fix the broken justice system. In addition to outlawing private prisons, Sanders also favors banning the box to minimize job discrimination against convicted felons, restoring voting rights for convicted felons, eliminating mandatory minimum sentences and putting greater emphasis on prison diversion programs. On Wednesday, Sanders met with Black Lives Matter activists to discuss future policy.

source

I would add while I was researching further to reply to your earlier post I found the overall prison population has been in decline while the private prison population is growing.

There is also the question of the prison for profit corps running halfway houses and whether those numbers are included as prisoners in the statistics?

Thanks for making me think! AD



posted on Sep, 18 2015 @ 12:23 PM
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a reply to: MystikMushroom

I don't like Sanders at all. I really,really,really don't.

This is what I see with him.



Rather fitting since we are talking about prisons.



posted on Sep, 18 2015 @ 12:29 PM
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a reply to: AlaskanDad

Cool beans! Thinking is good ... keeps the brain young!

I have no doubt the private prison population is going to grow. If Republicans and the GOP had their way, everything would be privatized and we'd all become slaves to companies and corporations.

It's a conservative paradise like an Ayn Rand ideal world, companies ruling everything with a tiny government never stepping in or asserting any authority on behalf of the people it is supposed to represent.



You load sixteen tons, what do you get?
Another day older and deeper in debt
Saint Peter, don't you call me 'cause I can't go
I owe my soul to the company store

edit on 18-9-2015 by MystikMushroom because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 18 2015 @ 12:42 PM
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a reply to: MystikMushroom

The idea of a corporate prison system used to be simply a thing of science fiction movies in my youth but not now they are the norm.

Bernie actually tackles issues that the other candidates haven't even thought of. The things he talks about give me the impression of a person who actually cares and wants to improve the country unlike the others who simply parrot each other and make calculated moves based on their campaign managers polling of the public.

There will be people that don't like him, but they never make much sense when they try to explain why they feel that way. I say let those people act the fool they will not affect the outcome anyway.



posted on Sep, 18 2015 @ 12:44 PM
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a reply to: neo96

Neo, I thought prisons were the elites way to end their gated communities. With all the workers and poor imprisoned they would no longer have to live in fear and hide behind gates, and the conservatives love cheap labor which prisons provide.

Next on their get tough on crime agenda, will be imprisoning those pirates for stealing data, music, and movie's, that should fill some beds!



posted on Sep, 18 2015 @ 12:45 PM
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a reply to: Grimpachi

Sure Bernie is "tackling the problem" -- but it's not that big of a problem. It *is* a problem, don't get me wrong -- but it's a drop in the bucket compared to the much, much bigger picture of the prison system as a whole!

It's like zooming in on a tiny, tiny little sub-section of the whole and focusing your attention there, instead of zooming out and seeing it all at once and nearly doubling over in shock at the size of it all.

There is a time and a place to zoom in and focus like a laser beam. This, however, is not one of them. We need to be tackling the prison system as a whole, as well as the court and justice system that is creating all these prisoners in the first place!

It's misdirected energy IMO, as if you worked to prevent more prisoners created in the first place, the private prison system issue would drop completely as a side effect.



posted on Sep, 18 2015 @ 12:58 PM
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a reply to: MystikMushroom

As you said earlier in the thread Bernie is a politician. As a politician I am sure he knows that if he were to go on to too many issues in the system most of his message would be lost, but the mere fact that he is focusing in that direction says to me that he is looking at the system.

Just like if you started a thread here, if you tried to address the entire issue at once most people would be overwhelmed and if they did respond to it they would focus on a small portion of it.

Same principle.


That is why I do not see it as misdirected energy. It is actually focusing energy in the right direction on a issue most will agree that doesn't mean it can't be expanded.



posted on Sep, 18 2015 @ 01:12 PM
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a reply to: 3NL1GHT3N3D1
Because anything privatized at all goes against the grain of Statist Big Government and never mind that they are at least working for their room and board and not costing so much to the taxpayers.

edit on 18-9-2015 by ThirdEyeofHorus because: Typos



posted on Sep, 18 2015 @ 01:29 PM
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originally posted by: ThirdEyeofHorus
a reply to: 3NL1GHT3N3D1
Because anything privatized at all goes against the grain of Statist Big Government and never mind that they are at least working for their room and board and not costing so much to the taxpayers.


No bid contract does not sound cost effective to me!

ICE Gives Private Prison No-Bid Contract for Alien Detention Center


U.S. Immigrations and Customs Enforcement (ICE) appear to be circumventing the bidding process for building a commercially-operated detention facility by having an Arizona city manage the manage the Texas based operation. The new 2,400-bed facility, which will be operated by the Corrections Corporation of America (CCA), is being built in Dilley, Texas but will be overseen by the city of Eloy, Arizona.



But it is the CCA with its $260 million per year no-bid contract that stands to really rake in the cash.

source

Both government and private prisons have work programs, though state prisons are built and supplied through a bidding process, private prisons are for profits that usually come a the expense of the taxpayers.

Can you show any proof of private prisons saving us money? I guess you could say that CCA saved Idaho a million dollars when Idaho sued them, right?



posted on Sep, 18 2015 @ 02:33 PM
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a reply to: MystikMushroom

Where did you get 10,000 inmates in private prisons? Your source says 62,000.


...Ten years ago there were only five private prisons in the country, with a population of 2,000 inmates; now, there are 100, with 62,000 inmates. It is expected that by the coming decade, the number will hit 360,000...


And boy, are they productive!


...the federal prison industry produces 100% of all military helmets, ammunition belts, bullet-proof vests, ID tags, shirts, pants, tents, bags, and canteens. Along with war supplies, prison workers supply 98% of the entire market for equipment assembly services; 93% of paints and paintbrushes; 92% of stove assembly; 46% of body armor; 36% of home appliances; 30% of headphones/microphones/speakers; and 21% of office furniture. Airplane parts, medical supplies, and much more: prisoners are even raising seeing-eye dogs for blind people.



posted on Sep, 18 2015 @ 02:41 PM
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a reply to: MystikMushroom

ALSO: About 40% of the USA's juvenile inmates are housed in private facilities. That's a whole lot more than 0.05%.



According to federal data from 2011, around 40% of the nation's juvenile inmates are housed in private facilities.

Alternate Source


If the private prison industry is focusing on youth, that must mean there's more profit potential there. Wonder what that might be?




edit on 18/9/15 by soficrow because: Ed. to add



posted on Sep, 18 2015 @ 02:42 PM
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a reply to: AlaskanDad

ICE. Hmmm a govt contract ok



posted on Sep, 18 2015 @ 02:51 PM
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originally posted by: ThirdEyeofHorus
a reply to: AlaskanDad

ICE. Hmmm a govt contract ok


You are correct the government contracts for the incarceration of prisoners in private for profit prisons, just as the they pay for the government ran institutions, which need not make profits.



posted on Sep, 18 2015 @ 03:44 PM
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Mystik and the resident clowns that think targeting private prisons is a bad thing.

Jesus Christ... And you wonder why our nation is so damn corrupt and rife with inequality.



posted on Sep, 18 2015 @ 03:54 PM
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a reply to: MystikMushroom

I agree with Bernie on this one, the prison industry has exploded in the past few decades and I disagree with the reasons behind this and what I consider human rights violations (legalized slave labor). From the paper I wrote on Mass Incarceration of Non-violent Criminals:

"The United States ranks first in the world for percentage of imprisoned citizens – with 714 individuals incarcerated out of every 100,000 (PCARE 404). We spend over $68 billion a year on corrections each year in the United States (Selman & Leighton 79). The U.S. spends more than twice as much on prison inmates than it does on K-12 students each year – at an average $22,600 per prison inmate versus the average expense of $9,644 per student (Dyson 181). "

We should be investing more money in education, we're really failing or future generations (look at Common Core, U.S. rankings versus the rest of the developed world in Science, Math)

Sources:
Dyson, Maurice R. "Are we really racing to the top or leaving behind the bottom? Challenging conventional wisdom and dismantling institutional repression." Washington University Journal of Law & Policy 40 (2012): 181+. Legaltrac. Web. 1 Aug. 2014.

Prison Communication, Activism, Research, and Education. "Fighting the Prison-Industrial Complex: A Call to Communication and Cultural Studies Scholars to Change the World." Communication and Critical/Cultural Studies 4.4 (2007): 402-420. University of Minnesota Duluth. Web. 12 July 2014.



posted on Sep, 18 2015 @ 05:38 PM
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a reply to: AlaskanDad

and its the responsibility of Congress to do its job and not outsource it to the Fed or the President.

We are talking about State Prisons and I would like to see the contracts that require quotas be met.


a reply to: FamCore
People are missing the point that State laws differ in terms of crime and punishment. The Federal system is separate from the state systems. Trying to put it all into one basket as a comparison leaves out key elements that should be considered.

edit on 18-9-2015 by Xcathdra because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 18 2015 @ 06:22 PM
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originally posted by: Xcathdra

I would like to see the contracts that require quotas be met.



Advocacy group In the Public Interest obtained and analyzed 62 contracts between states and local jurisdictions and private prison companies that govern the operation of 77 county and state-level facilities. Sixty-five percent contained occupancy requirements between 80 and 100%, with many around 90%. Arizona (100%), Louisiana (96%), Oklahoma (98%), and Virginia (95%) had the highest quotas.

“These contract clauses incentivize keeping prison beds filled,” wrote the study’s authors, “which runs counter to many states’ public policy goals of reducing the prison population and increasing efforts for inmate rehabilitation.” Regardless of crime rates and public safety needs, these contracts require jurisdictions to maintain current levels of mass incarceration or pay millions of dollars for unused beds.

source

Or you can go here and choose from the many sources on private prison quotas.



posted on Sep, 18 2015 @ 07:15 PM
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originally posted by: AlaskanDad
a reply to: neo96

Neo, I thought prisons were the elites way to end their gated communities. With all the workers and poor imprisoned they would no longer have to live in fear and hide behind gates, and the conservatives love cheap labor which prisons provide.


Those that deserve that truly socialistic lifestyle still receive free rent, clothing, no taxes, 3 squares a day, medical care in a gated community with security guards. Privatize the prison system and take it off the backs of the taxpayers. Wasn't there a prison at one point (someone had the right idea) that made a blue jean product called "Prison Blues" well made dungarees, work shirts and profited to the point of offsetting significant taxpayer "donations". Some agency shut it down. License plates work as always.
edit on 18-9-2015 by vethumanbeing because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 18 2015 @ 07:57 PM
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originally posted by: vethumanbeing

Privatize the prison system and take it off the backs of the taxpayers.


Could you please show examples of for profit prisons taking anything off the backs of the taxpayers?




edit on 18-9-2015 by AlaskanDad because: cleaned up quote code



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