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What does the constitution mean to you?

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posted on Sep, 17 2015 @ 10:32 PM
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For this thread I'm going to request that people not go read the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, the Federalist Papers, or the Anti-Federalist Papers. Instead rely on your own knowledge, what you remember, what you've been taught, and what you believe.

When you think of the Constitution, what does that mean for you in your daily life? What freedoms do you have? What do you not have? Where are your rights challenged?

I'll post my own thoughts on this too a few posts down, it's too close to bedtime for me to properly write it out right now.




posted on Sep, 17 2015 @ 10:42 PM
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a reply to: Aazadan

It means a bunch of old men got together and wrote a pile of crap that was written just for them. It is worth as much as the hemp paper it was written on and would be better served smoked or used for toilet paper.



posted on Sep, 17 2015 @ 10:44 PM
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a reply to: Aazadan

The same as the 15, oops, 10 Commandments do - not a goddamn thing...

Negotiating the Obstacle of Life can be accomplished without becoming a Tool of the System.




posted on Sep, 17 2015 @ 10:49 PM
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a reply to: Aazadan

It means we won/lost..
It means many lives were taken that built the foundation for the great western culture we have now, it means life has an objective equality, it defines what it means to be free. It has given rise to the greatest diverse culture the world has ever seen, where we do not as par the course solve problems with a sword,but reach compromise and understanding. It very well may be the greatest document to grace this earth, say what you will about the actions of men between then and now, however it forged the way of a great progression. U2 says it quite well


edit on 17-9-2015 by TechniXcality because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 17 2015 @ 10:55 PM
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a reply to: soulpowertothendegree

Do you think it would have been better if it was written by young people with little, to no, life experience? If so, explain.



posted on Sep, 17 2015 @ 11:02 PM
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a reply to: Aazadan

Me - "a wonderful document designed to protect the rights of the individual in equal measure to those of the collective"

US Politicians and Lawyers and folks with problems accepting others rights on certain subjects - "It is something that comes in useful when I run out of toilet-paper"



posted on Sep, 17 2015 @ 11:04 PM
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It's a document representing a pinnacle of human thought, where a naysayer couldn't write an essay to save his life.



posted on Sep, 17 2015 @ 11:21 PM
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a reply to: Aazadan

To me, the Constitutional Convention was a successful attempt to illegally overturn the Articles of Confederation, so that the Federal government could gradually take 100% of the ruling power. The first drafts didn't include a Bill of Rights. Thank God there where Anti-Federalists involved in the drafting process.


edit on 17-9-2015 by BELIEVERpriest because: typo



posted on Sep, 18 2015 @ 07:05 AM
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a reply to: Aazadan


What does the constitution mean to you?


The Constitution is the recognition of, and legal establishment of, natural law as a system of justice, prosperity and survival. It represents a level playing field for all. It provides a framework in which everyone can be their best. It respects and promotes our natural right to autonomy and free will.

That's the Constitution... the critters in charge? Not so much.



posted on Sep, 18 2015 @ 07:06 AM
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It is a fairly succinct list of things the government cannot do and should subsequently be held more accountable for transgressing against.





edit on 18-9-2015 by AugustusMasonicus because: Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn



posted on Sep, 18 2015 @ 08:20 AM
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To me it is an inspired document that led the new-world to become the most historically significant country ever (speaking of US). It also brought opportunity to those who sought it and America became the greatest world power soon after.

While there is still a lot to complain about this country, there are even more things to be grateful for:
making capitalism an opportunistic form of trade (where merchants weren't spat upon like they used to be),
bringing the most advanced medical care in history,
bringing the technological age to the world,
being a strong member of the industrial age,
abolishing slavery of their own free will, the only country to do this at the time (although it brought on the civil war),
giving more in humanitarian aid to the world than any other country in history,
and finally, focusing a government on the people where countless other countries base their own constitution on our own.

Yes there are politicians that take advantage of the people and don't want us to have these freedoms so they can get a little more money in their pocket, but there is still a whole lot to be grateful for in this country.

God bless America.



posted on Sep, 18 2015 @ 08:30 AM
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a reply to: Aazadan

I'm not so sure that subjectivity is the correct mindset for interpreting the Constitution.



posted on Sep, 18 2015 @ 08:38 AM
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a reply to: Boadicea

I agree with you. I can't believe so many here rag on the Constitution... I don't get it. It's not being implemented 100%, but that doesn't mean there's something wrong with the document. I don't think it's written in stone or should never be changed, but it's a fantastic general idea of how a successful country should be run. By the people.

OP, I am fairly familiar with a lot of the Constitution, but particularly interested in the protections enumerated in the Bill of Rights, specifically, my rights to free expression, exercise of religion, right to firearm ownership, right to legal justice, right to privacy and the fact that we have MANY rights not enumerated in the document (9th).

I'm also interested in the ideals of separation of church and state (which I know isn't written that way, but the first guarantees it), citizenship and equal treatment under the law (14th), and the powers of the federal government as they relate to, and limit, state government (10th).
edit on 9/18/2015 by Benevolent Heretic because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 18 2015 @ 09:32 AM
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a reply to: Benevolent Heretic


I agree with you. I can't believe so many here rag on the Constitution... I don't get it. It's not being implemented 100%, but that doesn't mean there's something wrong with the document. I don't think it's written in stone or should never be changed, but it's a fantastic general idea of how a successful country should be run. By the people.


I think the problem is that the fundamental principles of the Constitution are no longer being taught... and, of course, those principles have been so perverted by those running the show. The result is a general misunderstanding, if not outright ignorance, of the philosophical foundation of the Constitution.

But that's a thread in and of itself, eh?



posted on Sep, 18 2015 @ 11:19 AM
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A piece of paper that's important to a whole bunch of foreign Johnnies down there in Yankieland.



posted on Sep, 18 2015 @ 11:20 AM
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originally posted by: greencmp
a reply to: Aazadan

I'm not so sure that subjectivity is the correct mindset for interpreting the Constitution.


Really? I think it's the perfect mindset. Everyone has a different interpretation, including each judge whose job it is to interpret the document. Look at how many threads are going on here based on people having different interpretations. You have the Kim Davis stuff where people are arguing freedom of religion, you have a thread saying Sanders has no right to free speech to mention the failures of the constitution, there's always a gun control thread going on, right to life vs abortion, and others. It's all subjective.



posted on Sep, 18 2015 @ 11:31 AM
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originally posted by: Aazadan

originally posted by: greencmp
a reply to: Aazadan

I'm not so sure that subjectivity is the correct mindset for interpreting the Constitution.


Really? I think it's the perfect mindset. Everyone has a different interpretation, including each judge whose job it is to interpret the document. Look at how many threads are going on here based on people having different interpretations. You have the Kim Davis stuff where people are arguing freedom of religion, you have a thread saying Sanders has no right to free speech to mention the failures of the constitution, there's always a gun control thread going on, right to life vs abortion, and others. It's all subjective.


You said don't read it.



posted on Sep, 18 2015 @ 06:22 PM
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originally posted by: greencmp
You said don't read it.


I did, because there's a big difference between what people believe to be true and what is actually true.



posted on Sep, 18 2015 @ 06:34 PM
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a reply to: ArnoldNonymous




the most historically significant country ever (speaking of US)


There are a few countries in the queue ahead of The U.S. when it comes to than honour.



posted on Sep, 18 2015 @ 09:39 PM
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to me the constitution isn`t a document telling me what I have a right too it`s a document telling the government what they can`t do.



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