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LHC creates liquid from Big Bang

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posted on Sep, 16 2015 @ 12:10 PM
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Wow, this is amazing, maybe we will be closer from understanding the universe than ever.

Scientists using the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) have produced tiny droplets of a state of matter thought to have existed right at the birth of the universe.




An international team at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) have produced quark-gluon plasma — a state of matter thought to have existed right at the birth of the universe — with fewer particles than previously thought possible. The results were published in the journal APS Physics on June 29, 2015.

The Large Hadron Collider is the world’s largest and most powerful particle accelerator. The LHC, located in a tunnel between Lake Geneva and the Jura mountain range on the Franco-Swiss border, is the largest machine in the world. The supercollider was restarted this spring (April 2015) following two years of intense maintenance and upgrade. Take a virtual tour of the LHC here.

The new material was discovered by colliding protons with lead nuclei at high energy inside the supercollider’s Compact Muon Solenoid detector. Physicists have dubbed the resulting plasma the “littlest liquid.”


So, the Big bang was not solid, but liquid??? Did i get ir right, this is a very interesting stuff.


Quan Wang is a University of Kansas researcher working with the team at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research. Wang described quark-gluon plasma as a very hot and dense state of matter of unbound quarks and gluons — that is, not contained within individual nucleons. He said:

It’s believed to correspond to the state of the universe shortly after the Big Bang.

While high-energy particle physics often focuses on detection of subatomic particles, such as the recently discovered Higgs Boson, the new quark-gluon-plasma research instead examines behavior of a volume of such particles.

Wang said such experiments might help scientists to better understand cosmic conditions in the instant following the Big Bang.


Source




posted on Sep, 16 2015 @ 12:49 PM
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a reply to: Frocharocha

So our galaxy is basically a sand castle at the bottom of an ocean. ...neat.



posted on Sep, 16 2015 @ 12:54 PM
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originally posted by: Frocharocha
Wow, this is amazing, maybe we will be closer from understanding the universe than ever.

Scientists using the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) have produced tiny droplets of a state of matter thought to have existed right at the birth of the universe.




An international team at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) have produced quark-gluon plasma — a state of matter thought to have existed right at the birth of the universe — with fewer particles than previously thought possible. The results were published in the journal APS Physics on June 29, 2015.

The Large Hadron Collider is the world’s largest and most powerful particle accelerator. The LHC, located in a tunnel between Lake Geneva and the Jura mountain range on the Franco-Swiss border, is the largest machine in the world. The supercollider was restarted this spring (April 2015) following two years of intense maintenance and upgrade. Take a virtual tour of the LHC here.

The new material was discovered by colliding protons with lead nuclei at high energy inside the supercollider’s Compact Muon Solenoid detector. Physicists have dubbed the resulting plasma the “littlest liquid.”


So, the Big bang was not solid, but liquid??? Did i get ir right, this is a very interesting stuff.


Quan Wang is a University of Kansas researcher working with the team at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research. Wang described quark-gluon plasma as a very hot and dense state of matter of unbound quarks and gluons — that is, not contained within individual nucleons. He said:

It’s believed to correspond to the state of the universe shortly after the Big Bang.

While high-energy particle physics often focuses on detection of subatomic particles, such as the recently discovered Higgs Boson, the new quark-gluon-plasma research instead examines behavior of a volume of such particles.

Wang said such experiments might help scientists to better understand cosmic conditions in the instant following the Big Bang.


Source


Not really a liquid....The term soup I'm sure is responsible for the misunderstanding.

It is to say that the matter in the universe at that time was made of Quarks and Gluons as space-time was far too energetic and hot for these particles to form into molecules of hydrogen at that point.



posted on Sep, 16 2015 @ 01:02 PM
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a reply to: Korg Trinity

photon soup?



posted on Sep, 16 2015 @ 01:12 PM
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originally posted by: TzarChasm
a reply to: Korg Trinity

photon soup?


Quark soup....

From quark soup to ordinary matter


Scientists have gained new insight into how matter can change from a hot soup of particles to the matter we know today.

The early universe was a trillion-degree soup of subatomic particles that eventually cooled into matter as it is today.



posted on Sep, 16 2015 @ 01:16 PM
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So, even the atoms had to construct or self-assemble themselves from sub-atomic particles, this fits that, that's attracted to that.
Eventually atoms are formed, then molecules, then finally after a few years we get dimwits sitting in front of a computer all day!



posted on Sep, 16 2015 @ 02:21 PM
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a reply to: Frocharocha

MMM Quark soup, can I get croutons or crackers with that???



posted on Sep, 16 2015 @ 02:25 PM
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WHat color was this liquid? was it white an d milky?



posted on Sep, 16 2015 @ 04:27 PM
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originally posted by: sycomix
a reply to: Frocharocha

MMM Quark soup, can I get croutons or crackers with that???


Yes, but you'll have to wait!



posted on Sep, 16 2015 @ 05:37 PM
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And they wonder why people don't trust scientists.



posted on Sep, 16 2015 @ 08:34 PM
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the definition of a liquid is very loosely used and doesn't really describe the state.

What is not to trust about us scientists Brian?
Do we scare you?



posted on Sep, 17 2015 @ 03:33 AM
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Perhaps fluid would be a more accurate term. Liquid implies a state of matter, which doesn't quite fit this circumstance.



posted on Sep, 17 2015 @ 05:37 AM
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does it get out coffee stains?



posted on Sep, 17 2015 @ 05:52 AM
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a reply to: Frocharocha

Think there was a Star Trek Voyager episode that suggested an extra-dimensional realm called "Fluidic Space".



posted on Sep, 17 2015 @ 05:54 AM
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Very very interesting development.
Looks like I'll have to recant my early prediction that CERN scientists might only discover that they need a bigger collider.



posted on Sep, 17 2015 @ 06:13 AM
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a reply to: Pilgrum

If that's is the case then it may be an idea to build there next iteration of particle collider in orbit given the energy requirements involved and the abundance of solar energy available. Technology and a means of traveling to low Earth orbit cost effectively being the main hurdles in the way i imagine.

Certainty be synonymous with the "Star Gate" doom porn surrounding the LHC.

edit on 17-9-2015 by andy06shake because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 18 2015 @ 05:47 PM
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originally posted by: andy06shake
a reply to: Pilgrum

If that's is the case then it may be an idea to build there next iteration of particle collider in orbit given the energy requirements involved and the abundance of solar energy available. Technology and a means of traveling to low Earth orbit cost effectively being the main hurdles in the way i imagine.

Certainty be synonymous with the "Star Gate" doom porn surrounding the LHC.
we already have (natural) particle colliders in orbit. all we need to do is build detectors for it.



posted on Sep, 18 2015 @ 06:08 PM
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a reply to: stormbringer1701

Cool but i imagine we would still need detectors located in orbit/within the particle stream.



posted on Sep, 19 2015 @ 01:15 AM
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originally posted by: chr0naut

originally posted by: sycomix
a reply to: Frocharocha

MMM Quark soup, can I get croutons or crackers with that???


Yes, but you'll have to wait!



I mean that by the time matter exists, to make croutons, the 'quark soup' would be quite cold.

Gazpacho anyone?




posted on Sep, 19 2015 @ 01:24 AM
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a reply to: Toadmund




So, even the atoms had to construct or self-assemble themselves from sub-atomic particles, this fits that, that's attracted to that.
Eventually atoms are formed, then molecules, then finally after a few years we get dimwits sitting in front of a computer all day!


I'dn't it just badass?

edit on Ram91915v25201500000037 by randyvs because: (no reason given)



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