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I saw this picture on twitter. I'm a little bit skeptical on how accurate it is.

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posted on Sep, 16 2015 @ 02:18 AM
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a reply to: Kangaruex4Ewe

Thanks for the input sir moderator... lol

Keep in mind I stated I was no expert.


edit on 16-9-2015 by frostie because: an idiot




posted on Sep, 16 2015 @ 02:19 AM
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a reply to: HawkeyeNation




So you're saying we could fit about 30 Earths in Uranus?


I must agree , Uranus does look big in those pictures .



posted on Sep, 16 2015 @ 02:19 AM
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a reply to: frostie

Jupiter is so huge you could fit all the planets in our solar system into it.

What would bother me far more than having the sun light shut out by that monstrosity would be the effect it could have on our atmosphere. I am not sure whether it would attract and therefore pull against the layers that protect us.
If I remember right then one could put Jupiter into the sun and still have loads of room to boogey.



posted on Sep, 16 2015 @ 02:24 AM
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a reply to: Shiloh7

Thats exacly why I was suspecting that it would be larger, but I was wrong.



google says 1000 Jupiter fit in the sun, but then again google seems to be an ignored source in this forum.



posted on Sep, 16 2015 @ 02:28 AM
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a reply to: frostie

This shows it even better



posted on Sep, 16 2015 @ 02:36 AM
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a reply to: frostie

I did another thread re how M31 the Andromeda Galaxy would look in the sky if it was as bright as the Moon.

How Our Sky Would Look If Andromeda was Brighter



edit on 16-9-2015 by wmd_2008 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 16 2015 @ 03:25 AM
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For everyone concerned with the actual viewing-angle "alpha" of Jupiter, here is the formula to use:

alpha = 2 x arctan (diameter_jupiter/(2*distance earth_moon))



posted on Sep, 16 2015 @ 03:27 AM
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Jupiter would subtend an angle of about 20 degrees in Earth's sky at the average distance of the Moon, so that image looks fine. As for the volume of Uranus, the radius is roughly four times that of Earth, so the volume is roughly four cubed, which is 64. That's roughly how many Earths would fit inside it.



posted on Sep, 16 2015 @ 03:55 AM
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originally posted by: Sublimecraft

originally posted by: frostie

Im no expert on the sizes of the planets and how they would appear if they were the same distance away as the moon.

I was thinking Jupiter should appear much bigger.

Thoughts?


Typical - Pluto gets dissed again. Pluto always gets the rough-end of the stick and imo I put this down to astro-discrimination

It's because Pluto is the Napoleon of the planets, super tiny and doing whatever it wants.



posted on Sep, 16 2015 @ 06:44 AM
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originally posted by: JimNasium
I don't see Planet X or Niribu... conspiracy?


SHHH.

I want it to eat us. and it will never happen if you keep reminding people about it, someone may even think it's not really there.



posted on Sep, 16 2015 @ 06:50 AM
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originally posted by: Vector99

originally posted by: Sublimecraft

originally posted by: frostie

Im no expert on the sizes of the planets and how they would appear if they were the same distance away as the moon.

I was thinking Jupiter should appear much bigger.

Thoughts?


Typical - Pluto gets dissed again. Pluto always gets the rough-end of the stick and imo I put this down to astro-discrimination

It's because Pluto is the Napoleon of the planets, super tiny and doing whatever it wants.


Well, I hope we can still find it once we've put it to rest.

nothing worse than losing your Pluto and finding it hidden under some dudes bed a hundred years later lol.

Oo



posted on Sep, 16 2015 @ 06:59 AM
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a reply to: NightSkyeB4Dawn

That's hilarious! when I seen the Jupiter one, I also got a queasy feeling for some reason. lol to funny!



posted on Sep, 16 2015 @ 07:00 AM
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a reply to: frostie

To help put it somewhat in perspective - Every single planet in our solar system can comfortably fit between the Earth and the Moon.

Distance from Earth to the Moon - 384,403 km / 238,857 miles

Jupiter - 88,846 miles (diameter)
Saturn - 36,184 miles (diameter)



posted on Sep, 16 2015 @ 07:01 AM
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originally posted by: frostie

...I was thinking Jupiter should appear much bigger.

Don't forget, the Moon is relatively far from the earth -- at least it's farther than some people may realize:




posted on Sep, 16 2015 @ 09:04 AM
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originally posted by: Sublimecraft

originally posted by: frostie

Im no expert on the sizes of the planets and how they would appear if they were the same distance away as the moon.

I was thinking Jupiter should appear much bigger.

Thoughts?


Typical - Pluto gets dissed again. Pluto always gets the rough-end of the stick and imo I put this down to astro-discrimination


It's because is so close to Uranus. //cue-rimshot//



posted on Sep, 16 2015 @ 09:19 AM
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a reply to: NightSkyeB4Dawn

They don't give me vertigo on the computer screen, but the first time I went out into the desert and looked up at the night sky, I did get slight vertigo from the sheer amount of and intensity of all of the stars--it literally startled me and made me feel nervous for a bit. If these really were looming overhead, it'd be uncomfortable, to say the least.



posted on Sep, 16 2015 @ 10:31 AM
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originally posted by: Xcathdra
a reply to: frostie

To help put it somewhat in perspective - Every single planet in our solar system can comfortably fit between the Earth and the Moon.

Distance from Earth to the Moon - 384,403 km / 238,857 miles

Jupiter - 88,846 miles (diameter)
Saturn - 36,184 miles (diameter)


Thanks, I was just going to mention that. The Moon is very far away from us. With Jupiter taking its place, there would still be space for Saturn, Neptune, Uranus, and all other planets end-to-end before you reach Earth.



posted on Sep, 16 2015 @ 11:18 AM
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well the earth should look a whole lot bigger, seen from the moon, than it actually appears to in every moon-based 'earth shot'. so accuracy isn't to be taken for granted.



posted on Sep, 16 2015 @ 01:15 PM
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originally posted by: RoScoLaz4
well the earth should look a whole lot bigger, seen from the moon, than it actually appears to in every moon-based 'earth shot'. so accuracy isn't to be taken for granted.

It's all about the lens used. Just like with images of the Moon as captured from Earth, you can get a small Earth with wide-angle lens, and a large Earth with telephoto lens. You can do a research into the lens used by the Apollo astronauts, the distance to Earth during each shot, how large Earth appears in those shots, and confirm or refute your position. Be my guest.

From my own research (by simply using the images and not involving maths), Apollo astronauts managed to get good shots of Earth, which looked fairly large, and the cloud formations matched the satellite images taken at the time.



For a comparison, the full moon as seen from Earth looks no bigger than your thumb nail on the outstretched arm.
edit on 16-9-2015 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 16 2015 @ 02:01 PM
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originally posted by: wmd_2008
a reply to: frostie

This shows it even better


I just remembered that a couple of months ago I had a dream where I had gone to see a Doctor at a University Hospital in Cleveland. On leaving the campus building, it was late evening, I walked out to everyone standing still, looking up at the sky. Above us were three huge planet like objects that looked very much like the view of Saturn and it's moons.

It was an amazing sight and everyone was clueless about what or why it was happening. Now I no why I had such a visceral response to the pictures. It was much worse in my dream.




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