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Everybody is closing borders in EU but Serbia keeps taking in refugees

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posted on Sep, 15 2015 @ 05:41 PM
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a reply to: PublicOpinion

germany is taking in refugees and housing them in Buchenwald and other concentration camps

www.dailymail.co.uk... nwald-thousands-slave-labourers-died-subjected-medical-experiments.html



Refugees in Germany are being housed in a former Nazi concentration camp where thousands of slave-labourers were once held. Twenty-one male asylum seekers have been moved to the former barracks of the notorious Buchenwald concentration camp, where SS officers killed thousands of prisoners during the Second World War. The migrants, some of whom have been living in the camp for several months, are being given 135 euros (£99) by the government for food and necessities while they wait to be moved. Read more: www.dailymail.co.uk... nwald-thousands-slave-labourers-died-subjected-medical-experiments.html#ixzz3lqkZfFKG Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
seems a temporary thing almost like ellis island before they get to their permenent homes but it seems germans are taking in refuges




posted on Sep, 15 2015 @ 06:13 PM
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The Serbs are not keeping them as their Foreign Minister said


Serbia is not a "collection center."


They are just shoving them at other borders, even busing them. This does not make the Serbs look good.



posted on Sep, 15 2015 @ 07:42 PM
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a reply to: RalagaNarHallas

People now flee from tyranny to places where others suffered from tyranny, which could be an ironic cosmic reminder to get our act together...



I mentioned closed borders, the Schengen-Deal is "dealt with" to be precise. It's more an emergency-thingy right now, and supposed to get lifted in a few weeks. Closed borders, patrols, passport-controls and all that crap. But we took refugees for a while now, yes.


The migrant crisis is putting pressure on the Schengen Agreement, which abolished the EU's internal borders, enabling passport-free movement across most of the bloc.

www.bbc.com...

Oktoberfest is coming and the refugees arrived in Munic. That can't be good for business so the Bavarians run a little berserk right now, as they had to face a lot of newcomers recently.


Munich ‘close to humanitarian disaster’ as country struggles to cope with biggest refugee influx since second world war

www.theguardian.com...

We surely need better personal, how in hell can 13000 people somehow nearly cause a disaster? Did they travel with lightspeed or is all this crap just another little play for the masses? You decide.


A system first agreed at Dublin in 1990 means that people requesting asylum must be housed and have their claims processed in the state in which they first arrived in the EU. A surge in arrivals by sea has left Italy and Greece struggling. Chaos in Greece means many move on across the Balkans to reach Hungary.

Accepting the Dublin rules must be fixed to spread the load, the Commission proposed to send some asylum-seekers from Italy and Greece around the EU according to quotas based on countries' population, wealth and so on. Bickering has held that up, while Greece and Italy have resorted to DIY methods to relieve the pressure, simply letting migrants head north over their borders.

www.reuters.com...

(Non-)sponsored by austerity cuts. Hmmm...


Habermas: [...]Streeck and I also share the view that this technocratic hollowing out of democracy is the result of a neoliberal pattern of market-deregulation policies. The balance between politics and the market has come out of sync, at the cost of the welfare state[...]

www.theguardian.com...

There is a pattern, innit?


edit on 15-9-2015 by PublicOpinion because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 15 2015 @ 08:08 PM
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Hungary remembers the effect of Islam unlike western Europe which it shielded for 400 years.

The hre and hence germany does not exist without hungary/austro-hungary holding back the ottomans for hundreds of years.



posted on Sep, 15 2015 @ 08:54 PM
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a reply to: mobiusmale

What a bummer! You ignored those historic walls of roman ignorance completely and didn't realize that I actually did compare Germany with Lebanon, but only regarding sheer numbers of inhabitants per refugee. Horay! Then you made up some weird assumptions about the costs of living and colourfully theorized, what I possibly meant with that "20 million" statement.

Frankly? I see three pretty bummer in row, quite remarkable! But you lost me completely. If you would have done some math in the first place, you might have had at least one good argument by now.




posted on Sep, 15 2015 @ 09:25 PM
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originally posted by: PublicOpinion
a reply to: mobiusmale

Because others started to close their borders. You didn't catch the Rome-drift, did you?

Anyway, I'm a not so proud German right now. We would have to take 20 mil. refugees if we were up to take the Lebanon as an example of how many people one country could possibly host. They are 4,5 mil. people there and took a million refugees.

Digest that. Chaos and expenses, eh? Ridiculous. Humanity is nothing you should try to put price-tags on.


I'm going out on a limb and guess Germany has no homeless, hungry, extremely poor, has a surplus in their social services, has plenty of bilingual staff staff across all infrastructure services, has no unemployment, has a nice numbers of jobs just waiting to be filled to include both high and low skill. It would be the only way that those concerned about the suffering of others would want to add what will be more issues to the mix is if there was no suffering where they live.

So since Germany is set, what number of immigrants do you think Germany can comfortably handle until things like hungry, homeless, unemployement, etc do become an issue? I assume they also have a specialize infrastructure in place to account for cultural and language barriers so integration is smooth. Primarily in places like the schools. You have any numbers in mind for number of immigrants or refugees to add based on what you can handle?



posted on Sep, 16 2015 @ 08:20 AM
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a reply to: Reallyfolks

Do your homework first. How many (guest) workers did Germany take after WW2 and where is the Islamic State of Friesia? Fear eats the soul, guys.

Let me ask you this: do you have any numbers?
Do you even know how many refugeers already came to Germany since, lets say.... 2012?



posted on Sep, 16 2015 @ 08:40 AM
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originally posted by: PublicOpinion
a reply to: Reallyfolks

Do your homework first. How many (guest) workers did Germany take after WW2 and where is the Islamic State of Friesia? Fear eats the soul, guys.

Let me ask you this: do you have any numbers?
Do you even know how many refugeers already came to Germany since, lets say.... 2012?


I'm asking the German folks. Don't live there, they are the ones who have to deal with the issue. No one concerned about human suffering would be willing to exchange 1 external problem for 50 internal problems due to pack of infrastructure. So I am asking Germans based on existing infrastructure how many can they handle and successfully integrate.

I find it odd that your answer to my question was another question on a completely different level. Ie current infrastructure and what it can handle and you ask about numbers since 2012. On that note I assume there have been no increases in things like homeless, hungry, poor, or unemployeed, and no integration problems since 2012 bit wasn't my question.



posted on Sep, 16 2015 @ 08:48 AM
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a reply to: stosh64


Why are no rich Arab countries taking in refugees?


Since when do we base what we do on what rich Arab countries do? It seems to me to do what's right, we must do the opposite of what they do. Those countries are not exactly beacons of light to be considered for role models.

(Not that I'm not concerned about the situation.)



posted on Sep, 16 2015 @ 08:54 AM
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a reply to: Willtell

# yea!! Blame America first! Blame the west first! We get what we deserve, # yea!

People like you keep me posting, thanks bud.



posted on Sep, 16 2015 @ 08:55 AM
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a reply to: Dinamo

Serbias goal was EU money and EU membership.



posted on Sep, 16 2015 @ 09:18 AM
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a reply to: Reallyfolks

Well. You talk about infrastructure and I see a lot of empty buildings here. We have a few Syrians in an old Bundeswehr-tower with vacant offices and it's still mainly vacant. They use just a few floors by now and there are dozens left.

I was asking if you have any numbers regarding guest-workers, as people were panicking back then as well. On a sidenote: those Syrians paid sums like 30.000$ to get here, the rich if you like.

The wellfare was cut down due to Agenda 2010 and that's the only point where I see a problem. We need to get rid of this neoliberal crap to restore decency and democracy in our democracies. Austerity-cuts are a real problem in Europe. But we can solve them and most of us are willing to work on solutions, the guardian interview with Habermas is pretty telling I think. You think he is alone and problems due to the status-quo can't be solved? Why?



posted on Sep, 16 2015 @ 11:15 AM
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a reply to: crayzeed



...when the M.E. countries have been made safe for them will they return to their own countries like proper refugees would do? I think not. In the little time they have in their host countries they will have at least one child with the host country...


 


going on with this academic side of the complicated issue....

I see it more like:

After the refugee's homelands are rid of the barbarians poising as religious zealots... the former rats nest might seem like a place of heritage to return to and rebuild your lives...

I know it will be hardship instead of handouts from the non-Muslim communities they are living off of
but the fleeing Iraqis, Lebanese, Syrians... will return to the resourcefulness and determination which the Kurds have shown over the decades of survival... it is in their blood

What wasn't in their playbook was to place their families into the jaws of certain death by a very unstable local commander who in one minute will favor a person and in the next moment slay the whole family tree because he got a message from the Koran that said genocide was the proper thing to do....or else renegade Jihad within his ranks of fighters wanting to rape or murder as a blessing to their One God...

95% of those fleeing their homeland are seeking sanctuary not a welfare handout... a sanctuary until the winds of change come blow in a better direction... in the meantime the West/EU/G20+ can clean out the rats nest of diseased minds and weed out the Tares in the refugee community, like hate promoting Jihadist Imams intent on slaying the whites/Christians or any other non-radical Muslims, or in ceding cities of the host country to Islam in destructive asymmetric war

both the misguided USA neocons and a fragmented WH mindset have given rise to these 10% of the population psychos who detest modern laws and contemporary moral codes woven through the fabric of every modern society & culture except 7th century recreations of primal Islam being born


edit on th30144242072016252015 by St Udio because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 16 2015 @ 11:34 AM
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originally posted by: PublicOpinion
a reply to: Reallyfolks

Well. You talk about infrastructure and I see a lot of empty buildings here. We have a few Syrians in an old Bundeswehr-tower with vacant offices and it's still mainly vacant. They use just a few floors by now and there are dozens left.

I was asking if you have any numbers regarding guest-workers, as people were panicking back then as well. On a sidenote: those Syrians paid sums like 30.000$ to get here, the rich if you like.

The wellfare was cut down due to Agenda 2010 and that's the only point where I see a problem. We need to get rid of this neoliberal crap to restore decency and democracy in our democracies. Austerity-cuts are a real problem in Europe. But we can solve them and most of us are willing to work on solutions, the guardian interview with Habermas is pretty telling I think. You think he is alone and problems due to the status-quo can't be solved? Why?


Again I have no clue if they can be solved. I am not on the ground and don't know what real Germans see. I was asking very valid questions. Based on what you have across all infrastructure and serives in place for successful integration. Also if there are many existing issues that this will add to? If not good luck. If so good luck. I see a lot of emotions on each side, a lot of labeling. Not a lot of common sense questions and realisticly addressing real issues that can arise



posted on Sep, 16 2015 @ 11:42 AM
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Developing countries benefit from masses of migrants, fully developed countries just can't sustain the high standards of living they worked for if they are giving away their money, space, food, etc to millions of outsiders - these are limited resources. It is just impossible and citizens shouldn't sand for it.



posted on Sep, 16 2015 @ 12:51 PM
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a reply to: St Udio

Well said, I agree.



 


a reply to: Reallyfolks

We know how to integrate those people, as we were able to do so before. You forgot another point, the dying Germans. Our birth-rate was way below the death-rate for years now, this new influx of refugees may actually help to fill the gap and keep the social systems up and running. But we will get problems if all these problems from Africa to the Middle East don't get solved sooner than later, that's for sure.




posted on Sep, 16 2015 @ 10:44 PM
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originally posted by: PublicOpinion
a reply to: St Udio

Well said, I agree.



 


a reply to: Reallyfolks

We know how to integrate those people, as we were able to do so before. You forgot another point, the dying Germans. Our birth-rate was way below the death-rate for years now, this new influx of refugees may actually help to fill the gap and keep the social systems up and running. But we will get problems if all these problems from Africa to the Middle East don't get solved sooner than later, that's for sure.




Good luck, don't see me issues ending anytime soon. So last question. When you say integration has been successful is it actually integrated or is it like the immigrants are all in one area?everyone is in Germany but in own communities, or is everyone everywhere?



posted on Sep, 17 2015 @ 12:46 AM
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originally posted by: RedParrotHead
Developing countries benefit from masses of migrants


Only if there are unfilled jobs. Europe doesn't really have developing countries, but unemployment rates are as high as ever. There aren't even enough jobs for our own, how are we supposed to give jobs to the migrants?



posted on Sep, 17 2015 @ 01:19 AM
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Sounds really nice. However: I really doubt Serbia, same for many others around there that are not "full/closing boarders", can take any of this due to bad economic conditions thus as why they aren't letting them settle.



posted on Sep, 17 2015 @ 08:42 AM
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a reply to: csehszlovakze

Agreed. I wouldn't classify many European countries as "developing" ... most are developed as you can get IMO! I guess I was thinking along the lines of the U.S.A. from like the 1800s to 1950's (that's about when the standardized shipping container pretty much destroyed the US industrial complex) ... lots of land and factories and not enough bodies to work it.

Most of the people trying to get into the EU come from countries that could use a lot of development anyway...where are these people going? Gotta be opportunities at home, even if they have to band together and take control from the war mongers making life there horrible.



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