It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Fallingwater...One of the world's most beautiful homes.

page: 1
11

log in

join
share:

posted on Sep, 13 2015 @ 10:10 PM
link   
Designed by architect Frank Lloyd Wright in 1935, Fallingwater took nearly three years to build. It was completed in 1939.
The house is located in rural Pennsylvania, about 45 miles southeast of Pittsburgh, in the Allegheny Mountains. It sits over a waterfall on Bear Run, a small tributary of the Youghiogheny River.

The final cost for the home was $155,000, which includes a guest house, garage, servants' quarters, and interior furnishings.

This organically designed house includes a fireplace hearth in the living room made from boulders found on site. The site's ground, composed of a smooth ledge rock, actually forms the living room floor to "link the outside with the inside".

Although the house sits over a waterfall, which can be heard throughout, Wright purposely did not include a view of the waterfall from
the house. He thought if the waterfall was in plain sight from the house, it would lose its magic. It would be taken for granted. To see the waterfall, you have to take a short hike outside the house.




Living Room:




A longer documentary:




posted on Sep, 13 2015 @ 10:12 PM
link   
a reply to: ColeYounger

Always the first house that comes to mind when I think about secluded abodes.




posted on Sep, 13 2015 @ 10:20 PM
link   
I've visited Falling water years ago. It's a remarkable design.
My grandfather, in fact, was a stone mason who worked on the building.



posted on Sep, 13 2015 @ 10:30 PM
link   

originally posted by: IAMTAT
I've visited Falling water years ago. It's a remarkable design.
My grandfather, in fact, was a stone mason who worked on the building.


Cool!




posted on Sep, 13 2015 @ 10:30 PM
link   
Innit great, the things humans can create when they got lots and lots and lots of money?



posted on Sep, 13 2015 @ 10:35 PM
link   

originally posted by: TerryMcGuire
Innit great, the things humans can create when they got lots and lots and lots of money?

not to mention, vision, talent and imagination.



posted on Sep, 13 2015 @ 10:41 PM
link   
a reply to: TerryMcGuire

it was a maintance nightmare, the thing was so full of dry rot they nicknamed it "Rising Mildew"., they had too sink millions into it to keep it from collapse



posted on Sep, 13 2015 @ 10:44 PM
link   
I visited a couple of years ago. What struck me about it was how far ahead of its time the design was. I felt like I was in a home that was designed in the 50s or 60s instead of the 20s. It's also amazing to me that we are still trying to achieve an open floor plan like this and also incorporate the outdoors.

Frank Lloyd Wright was truly a visionary that was way ahead of his time.



posted on Sep, 13 2015 @ 10:45 PM
link   

originally posted by: AttitudeProblem
a reply to: TerryMcGuire

it was a maintance nightmare, the thing was so full of dry rot they nicknamed it "Rising Mildew"., they had too sink millions into it to keep it from collapse



Oh no, that's awful!




posted on Sep, 13 2015 @ 10:53 PM
link   
a reply to: ColeYounger

My original house designs here were based on Fallingwater (At least a cantilevered design, built on, and into, the side of a hill with a 'view')

I also had planned a 'stream' with waterfalls intertwined (actually reticulated water with a storage 'duck pond' at the bottom of the hill). That's still on the books as a 'to do' item. Part of a garden for meditation and prayer.

Unfortunately, the hillside where I intended to place the house was softer than the bedrock Fallingwater was built upon, so cantilevered design was out.

Cost was also a concern so I opted for a more comfortable, single level house at the top of the hill.

I also have an 'open' design as the North facing walls overlooking the hill are actually bi-fold glass doors (double glazed, so they trap heat). Also the individual rooms also have large double glazed picture windows facing the view. The view is private, only facing farmland, river and away in the distance, the city, so there's no need for curtains or blinds.

If money was no object, I'd have reinforced the hill just to have a similar design. Fallingwater is truly beautiful architecture.


edit on 13/9/2015 by chr0naut because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 13 2015 @ 11:37 PM
link   

originally posted by: AttitudeProblem
a reply to: TerryMcGuire

it was a maintance nightmare, the thing was so full of dry rot they nicknamed it "Rising Mildew"., they had too sink millions into it to keep it from collapse



Yes, I read that the house was a maintenance nightmare for some time. A good lesson that the design is not always easily implemented!
I saw a documentary about a builder who makes custom log homes from huge pieces of timber.
They'll use giant trees for columns and support beams. It's impressive how they have it all figured out. The dos and donts they employ to keep the wood supple so it doesn't get too damp or too dry.



posted on Sep, 13 2015 @ 11:38 PM
link   
a reply to: chr0naut

Sounds like a cool house. You should post a pic or two.



posted on Sep, 14 2015 @ 10:01 AM
link   
An interesting story about Fallingwater, told to my dad by my Grandfather...

Shortly after it was built, the owner was very worried about the balcony not having the necessary support.
My Grandfather, who was a local stone mason, was later called in by the owner to build a stone support pillar beneath it...which he and his crew did for the owner.

Years later, Fallingwater's owner told my grandfather that Frank Lloyd Wright came by one day...and the owner told him, apologetically, that he had been concerend about the balcony falling and that he had the stone support pillar built beneath it. Since then, he had felt more secure about it's ability to support itself, structurally.

FLW said to the owner that he had also visited shortly after the support pillar had been built by my grandad...noticed it...and without the owner's knowledge, removed the top several stones of the pillar, where it met the balcony's underside...effectively revoving any support the pillar was built to offer.

The owner then removed the rest of the stone pillar my grandfather had built for him...saying that FLW had proven to him that the architectural design of the balcony was structurally sound as it was designed.
edit on 14-9-2015 by IAMTAT because: comment added



posted on Sep, 14 2015 @ 02:55 PM
link   

originally posted by: ColeYounger
a reply to: chr0naut

Sounds like a cool house. You should post a pic or two.


Still a work in progress. The hill was cleared so it will take some time to re-establish vegetation and "mature" the design, so It looks nothing like Fallingwater in that regard. Also, it has been lived in and so has a bit of clutter (books, electronics & computer equipment) plus because of the size, we have ended up storing stuff from the kids and parents houses.

My next steps are a garage/shed/workshop/lab and to level the surrounding hilltop land (& replant). Also, our septic system is a "bio-cycle" one and we have left its drip field grassed over and undeveloped. I want to plant NZ native plants there that would normally thrive in swampy conditions (ferns, flaxes and so forth).

I'll see if I can upload some piccys at some stage.




posted on Sep, 14 2015 @ 03:17 PM
link   
I love the Lego-set, its a classic:

Googlesearch pics



posted on Jul, 1 2016 @ 02:57 AM
link   
Me too!



new topics

top topics



 
11

log in

join