It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Tipping the waiter ... is this an unwritten law. Where does this come from?

page: 2
7
<< 1    3  4  5 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Sep, 13 2015 @ 01:58 PM
link   

originally posted by: zatara
I am not from the US but know that it is custom and maybe a tradition to tip the waiter. Where I live it is no shame not to tip a waiter... just because of the fact that he is doing his job like any other professional. Of course do we tip if we are very satisfied and this woman or man deserve something extra for his/ her services. Is it only waiters but also other professions that need to be tipped?

Do waiters not earn enough, do they not have a Union... what is all this tipping about in the US? Are there other countries that you know of with the same "unwriten" laws or traditions?

Just asking because I want to understand before I visit the USA.

Thx



Waiters and waitresses don't make crap without tips.

Not even close to minimum wage in most cases




posted on Sep, 13 2015 @ 02:02 PM
link   
Makes me glad I live in a place that has $17 an hour min. wage.

I've heard how it is over there in some places. It sounds like some rogue old western town the way some places operate... or not, last place I heard of started up, was completely useless to it's employees and is now shut down. lol

that, and throw in unfair dismissals in "at-will" states.. what job security. What financial security.

Man, glad I never did go live there..



posted on Sep, 13 2015 @ 02:09 PM
link   

originally posted by: sn0rch

that, and throw in unfair dismissals in "at-will" states.. what job security. What financial security.

Man, glad I never did go live there..


What would qualify as an "unfair dismissal" to you ?



posted on Sep, 13 2015 @ 02:11 PM
link   
a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan

Thanks for the heads-up, I wasn't aware of that. This particular dinner happened in a restaurant in Florida well before 2014. A lot of people must of complained for them to make it illegal under federal law.



posted on Sep, 13 2015 @ 02:16 PM
link   

originally posted by: sn0rch

that, and throw in unfair dismissals in "at-will" states.. what job security. What financial security.

Man, glad I never did go live there..


In the state of Texas you pay SUI - State Unemployment Insurance. This is a risk based fee that is levied on payroll, and risk is assigned by the employers claim history.

If someone leaves employment, or has a reduction in hours that brings them below FT status (unless they are PT or On Call employees), they can file an unemployment claim against their employer. In the case of reduced hours, a hering happens and an employer will recieve a "Chargeback", meaning their SUI account is charged for the balance of unemployment benefits to be paid. If you terminate someone, then you have a hearing. If the hearing officer/judge determines tht you didn't have cause, then you recieve a "Chargeback". Ways to guarantee you will lose an unemployment hearing:

- Fire an employee on the first warning for something that is not a major policy violation (ie., breaking the law by stealing, assaulting, drug use, etc)
- Fire an employee in a manner inconsistent with your company policy.
- If your policy does not allow for some level of progressive corrective action (ie, you fire people without any warning, and don't show any attempt to train/coach aberrant behaviors before terminating)

For an employee to receive benefits, they are paid based on their average earnings over the prior 12 months. Meaning slackers get nada.

For more info, Google "EFTE" (Especially For Texas Employers). What you will find should be fairly standard for most "Right to Work" states.



posted on Sep, 13 2015 @ 02:19 PM
link   
a reply to: WeRpeons

I would be it was either a lawsuit, or that a light went over above the head of some IRS senior who realized that they could bilk a little more money by making it a taxable revenue for the restaurant, as well as an income for the employee. So to include a 'tip" you have to call it a service charge, which makes it subject to sales tax as well as income tax for the company. a double hit for the restaurant.



posted on Sep, 13 2015 @ 03:23 PM
link   
a reply to: zatara
I tip when I can. I don't want to be the guy in this video, Mr. Pink.

Warning:language is a bit rough.



posted on Sep, 13 2015 @ 03:31 PM
link   
a reply to: zatara



Greetings- Tips= To Insure Prompt Service. The 'tip' was given when one ordered and the 'tip' was To Insure Prompt Service. This was back when they gave whiskey to kids in school so You have to go back a few...

But now there are "Tip" jars at the gas station; the pizza parlor or just about anywhere folks think they can hook a sucker..

Do what I do and others who are 'cheap screws' Use the drive-through...

Bon Appetit



posted on Sep, 13 2015 @ 04:00 PM
link   

originally posted by: JimNasium
Greetings- Tips= To Insure Prompt Service. The 'tip' was given when one ordered and the 'tip' was To Insure Prompt Service. This was back when they gave whiskey to kids in school so You have to go back a few...

I think that old chestnut is a myth.
"Tip" is an old slang expression for "give".
Someone in Treasure island says "Tip us a stave" (= give us a song").
"If I see a copper coming, I'll tip you the wink".



posted on Sep, 13 2015 @ 04:07 PM
link   

originally posted by: DISRAELI
I think that old chestnut is a myth.
"Tip" is an old slang expression for "give".
Someone in Treasure island says "Tip us a stave" (= give us a song").
"If I see a copper coming, I'll tip you the wink".


You are correct:


What's more, the habit of spuriously discovering acronyms as the "real" source of English words seems to be only as old as the late 19th century. The well-known fiction that posh is an acronym, for example, seems to have emerged circa 1968. Frederick W. Hackwood's 1909 book "Inns, Ales and Drinking Customs of Old England" claims the restaurant server's word tip comes from a mid-18th century custom and stands for "To Insure Promptitude." A reviewer of the book in the "Athenaeum" of Oct. 2, 1909, wrote, "We deprecate the careless repetition of popular etymologies such as the notion that "tip" originated from an abbreviated inscription on a box placed on the sideboard in old coaching-inns .... Nonetheless, the fable persists (since 1946 often altered to "to insure promptness"). Source



posted on Sep, 13 2015 @ 04:08 PM
link   

originally posted by: zatara
I am not from the US but know that it is custom and maybe a tradition to tip the waiter. Where I live it is no shame not to tip a waiter... just because of the fact that he is doing his job like any other professional. Of course do we tip if we are very satisfied and this woman or man deserve something extra for his/ her services. Is it only waiters but also other professions that need to be tipped?

Do waiters not earn enough, do they not have a Union... what is all this tipping about in the US? Are there other countries that you know of with the same "unwriten" laws or traditions?

Just asking because I want to understand before I visit the USA.

Thx



I think we the people simply let ourselves be controlled. Tipping was originally a CHOICE, it was a sign that you were very please with the service provided and tipping the person assured good service in the future but it was a choice.

On the day it stopped being a choice all the people should have stopped tipping! The Government has arranged for the citizens to pay part of the workers wage and tax the restaurant or other establishment automatically for a % of income as tips!

This is pure thievery and we allow it and people will just say poor worker needs out tips, they can't even see the manipulation which has taken place and the fact that ANOTHER freedom has been stolen!



posted on Sep, 13 2015 @ 04:13 PM
link   

originally posted by: JohnTheSmith
a reply to: wastedown

I've never understood this. How do they get away with this, and why is it okay? I want to pay my employees let's say... $10.00 an hour and they can charge all my customers for gratuity to cover the rest of their paychecks. /sarcasm

Geez


McDonald's starting wage in my area is $10.00 per hour.



posted on Sep, 13 2015 @ 04:15 PM
link   

originally posted by: ForwardThinker
Most waiters and waitresses are only making about 2.15 and hour (Texas) and most of the 2.15 is going to pay the taxes on their check. Tipping does balance it out to an extent. Some days are better than others. My opinion don't go out to eat if you cannot afford to tip your waiter. I


The reason is because we allow it to be so. In states where the min wage is required for everyone the tip is still figured in by the IRS and taxed. Tipping has lost the good feel of doing something extra to being demanded and those tipped have zero appreciation of your gesture all they have anger at any whom they decided shorted them on their required tip, we need to remove the name it is no longer a tip, it is pay.

www.dol.gov...



posted on Sep, 13 2015 @ 04:23 PM
link   

originally posted by: SeaWorthy

The Government has arranged for the citizens to pay part of the workers wage and tax the restaurant or other establishment automatically for a % of income as tips!


You pay ALL of the worker's wage whether it is in tip or salary.



posted on Sep, 13 2015 @ 04:31 PM
link   
a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

Then I'll seek a Mason to un-google Google™ per the 'religare' motion...

That is what I get for watching that travel show on before Jeopardy™...

But I'll certainly continue going through the 'Drive Through' then I don't have to figure out the 18%-23% (inflation c.o.l.a.)

For the rest of the readers: Here I am jumping on the sword for My mis-deed.. No Sol for 'sungazing' so I'll take 2 extra melatonins to sleep tonight...



posted on Sep, 13 2015 @ 04:31 PM
link   

originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus
a reply to: zatara

Besides tipping wait staff (up to 20% for good service) you should also tip cabdrivers, bellhops, hairdressers/barbers and delivery persons.

Oh, and strippers.



Delivery people? What kind of delivery people? If in a 5 star hotel and getting room service that is not standard housekeeping services, I can see that. As far as delivery (the person who delivered my mattress, or dishwasher, or the UPS person who comes like 3-4 times a week), um, no.

Otherwise, cabbies, bellhops, hairdressers/barbers, agreed.



posted on Sep, 13 2015 @ 04:33 PM
link   
a reply to: zatara

i dont know where it comes form but most people tip 15-20% of their bill.
im talking automatically. they have tip calculators and all that.

waiters do make only a few bucks an hour and the tip is supposed to be an incentive. you know, to be friendly. to be johnny on the spot with the refills. things like that.

if the wait staff does ok i will leave a couple bucks. as in 2-3 bucks.

i dont care if my bill is $15 or $100.

i fail to see how the price of my meal being more should equal me leaving more for the waiter.

so i should tip more because this week we decided to order steak and last week we ordered a hit dog?
yeah. that dont fly with me.

give good service and i leave a few bucks. if im not happy with the service then i dont leave anything.
thats how it works for me



posted on Sep, 13 2015 @ 04:35 PM
link   

originally posted by: Liquesence
Delivery people? What kind of delivery people? If in a 5 star hotel and getting room service that is not standard housekeeping services, I can see that. As far as delivery (the person who delivered my mattress, or dishwasher, or the UPS person who comes like 3-4 times a week), um, no.


I was referring to food delivery people. Pizza guy, Chinese restaurant, etcetera.



posted on Sep, 13 2015 @ 04:37 PM
link   
a reply to: SeaWorthy

Tipping is still a choice, with the exception of the few restaurants who add gratuity either due to the size of the party or the type of dining (upscale, for instance).



posted on Sep, 13 2015 @ 04:38 PM
link   

originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus

originally posted by: Liquesence
Delivery people? What kind of delivery people? If in a 5 star hotel and getting room service that is not standard housekeeping services, I can see that. As far as delivery (the person who delivered my mattress, or dishwasher, or the UPS person who comes like 3-4 times a week), um, no.


I was referring to food delivery people. Pizza guy, Chinese restaurant, etcetera.



Oh, yeah, duh.

That's how long it's been since I had *that* done.




top topics



 
7
<< 1    3  4  5 >>

log in

join