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Tipping the waiter ... is this an unwritten law. Where does this come from?

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posted on Sep, 13 2015 @ 01:00 PM
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I am not from the US but know that it is custom and maybe a tradition to tip the waiter. Where I live it is no shame not to tip a waiter... just because of the fact that he is doing his job like any other professional. Of course do we tip if we are very satisfied and this woman or man deserve something extra for his/ her services. Is it only waiters but also other professions that need to be tipped?

Do waiters not earn enough, do they not have a Union... what is all this tipping about in the US? Are there other countries that you know of with the same "unwriten" laws or traditions?

Just asking because I want to understand before I visit the USA.

Thx


edit on 13/9/2015 by zatara because: (no reason given)




posted on Sep, 13 2015 @ 01:07 PM
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a reply to: zatara

I think it is different in the US due to the rubbish hourly rate of pay so a gratuity is expected. Usually I think, being British,15-20%.

I personally in the UK only ti 10% because the minimum wage is OK, and you get a supplemented in your income due to our welfare system to reach a standard of living.

Obviously in the US they don't hence the culture of tipping being more prevalent. I would suggest reading a book on US etiquette or just googling it.



posted on Sep, 13 2015 @ 01:09 PM
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If you don't at least in most US city's it is not only customary but also frowned at when people short the waiter/waitress. It's just part of dinning out and it's more of a I appreciate you serving me and making sure my dinning experiance is plesent at 8 dollars an hour (that pay is # and most of them get payed well below minimum because the tips average out to minimum wage



posted on Sep, 13 2015 @ 01:10 PM
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a reply to: zatara

Besides tipping wait staff (up to 20% for good service) you should also tip cabdrivers, bellhops, hairdressers/barbers and delivery persons.

Oh, and strippers.



posted on Sep, 13 2015 @ 01:15 PM
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When it comes down to it and if I was a waiter in my eyes if I saw a non tipping person I would just asume there to poor to tip and with that logic shouldn't be dinning out in the first place. Or if there clothing suggests they aren't then there a stingy snobs who walk on air, fart flowers and everyone is below them. a reply to: hknudzkknexnt

edit on 13-9-2015 by hknudzkknexnt because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 13 2015 @ 01:17 PM
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Most waiters and waitresses are only making about 2.15 and hour (Texas) and most of the 2.15 is going to pay the taxes on their check. Tipping does balance it out to an extent. Some days are better than others. My opinion don't go out to eat if you cannot afford to tip your waiter. I



posted on Sep, 13 2015 @ 01:19 PM
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a reply to: zatara
Undoubtedly imported from Britain, dating from a time when the people who served you would get little from their employers.
I understand from old novels that it was also normal to tip the servants of a private residence where you had been staying.
A dialogue exchange from Agatha Christie's "Why didn't they ask Evans?";
"If a house has only two servants, which one do you tip?"
"The parlour-maid, because you never see the cook".
In Britain it is certainly still expected in restaurants (where it is increasingly appearing on the bill automatically), and taxi drivers may still expect something as well.
U.S. expectations may be similar.



posted on Sep, 13 2015 @ 01:19 PM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

Indeed good sir, indeed.



posted on Sep, 13 2015 @ 01:25 PM
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in the States wait staff do not get paid minimum wage. I am not sure of the exact amount but it is under 4$ per hour because they DEPEND on tips to survive. If it is a slow week the business is responsible to pay that worker up to minimum wage if they did not earn it in tips. Many people don't know but we have a DriveIn place called Sonic. No tables, they bring fast-food to your car, and are tip workers. They don't refill your drinks, they come one time and it is to drop off food and collect the $. The company found out they could pay people this way and went with it not bothering to tell customers that the car hops are depending on your pay their wages in addition to paying for your food. We get fast-food differently than we get restaurant food, how are we to know where the line is? Tips atMcDonalds would surely be accepted but not expected though you will avoid the spit in your burger.



posted on Sep, 13 2015 @ 01:29 PM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

LOL!
My S.O. would certainly agree with you!


We always tip at least 20% (we live in the US) as 20% is easier math than 15%...
I has it's benefits down the line.
For example, the wait staff/server remember you and your name, they are even more eager to please the next time you frequent their establishment, if it is a bar, our favorite beverage is on the bar before we even sit or I get my coat off.
I think dealing with the public can be a difficult job at most times and when someone is able to do it with a genuine care, smile, concern, and class and grace they deserve a little extra "pat on the back" and in the service industries such as a wait person/server, it is nice that it can come in the form of a "tip". Something that they can use to maybe help them out at school or with gas, or diapers for their child, etc.
I dislike places where the wait staff (servers) must share their tips with EVERYONE.



posted on Sep, 13 2015 @ 01:34 PM
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a reply to: wastedown

I've never understood this. How do they get away with this, and why is it okay? I want to pay my employees let's say... $10.00 an hour and they can charge all my customers for gratuity to cover the rest of their paychecks. /sarcasm

Geez



posted on Sep, 13 2015 @ 01:38 PM
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a reply to: wastedown

Okay, I get the picture..

Now I should compare the prices here in my country for a Big Mac and one in the US. If these are the same or maybe more expensive in the US there is something really wrong. But I don't know...yet.

The owner of the establishment will be laughing his socks off when he is counting his money after closing time.

Still an open question tho...




posted on Sep, 13 2015 @ 01:38 PM
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a reply to: zatara

Servers get like 1/3 minimum wage here.. I make $11.00 an hour in the back. What's minimum wage here like $7.25
They make like $2.50 say?

You do the math.
After taxes their checks are like $50... It's all tips..


anyway..

edit on 13-9-2015 by Reverbs because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 13 2015 @ 01:40 PM
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a reply to: wastedown

I know an owner of several Sonics, and bring this up to him frequently:

The most "wrong" part about Sonic is tht they have CC readers, and customers can pay with a CC...but you cannot leave a tip on the CC. Which just blows my mind, as it should be an easy account set up in the POS system.

So folks like me, who just don't ever have cash, cannot comfortably eat at Sonic. Im not going to eat there and stiff one of the servers, most of whom i know as well (since i have a kid in High school right now, as well as friends with kids). which sucks....i like sonic. And it is hurting the owner.

The way I see it: he doesn't care enough about his employees to engineer a system that is equitable for them.



posted on Sep, 13 2015 @ 01:45 PM
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originally posted by: zatara
a reply to: wastedown

Okay, I get the picture..

Now I should compare the prices here in my country for a Big Mac and one in the US. If these are overall the same or maybe more expensive in the US there is something really wrong. In that case the owner of a respected establishment will have a lot of fun when counting his money after closing time. But thats an other thread..


Still an open question tho...




posted on Sep, 13 2015 @ 01:47 PM
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a reply to: zatara

Unfortunately, tipping a waiter or waitress is expected in the U.S. Since the restaurant businesses in the U.S. doesn't pay their waitress or waiters a livable hourly wage. However, I think restaurants should be shouldering more of the responsibility for their servers salary. I will usually leave a 20% tip and seldom less than 15%.

It's like paying for an extra dinner when you have a party of 4, which to me is really kind of ridiculous. If the restaurant is upscale, waitresses and waiters can make a decent salary and on some days they can go home with a pretty good days pay.

I think the hourly base minimum wage in my state is a little under $3.00 an hour. Other states have a different minimum. It seems like a lot of jobs in the U.S. are now expecting the public to tip for some services that should be covered by the employer. The public shouldn't be expected to tip. Tipping should be at the discretion of the person who is receiving the service.

I've been to restaurants where they will automatically include a 15% tip, which I think is going too far. Some of these were for buffet places where we served ourselves!! The only thing that was brought to our table was drinks.



posted on Sep, 13 2015 @ 01:51 PM
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originally posted by: WeRpeons
a reply to: zatara


I've been to restaurants where they will automatically include a 15% tip, which I think is going too far. Some of these were for buffet places where we served ourselves!! The only thing that was brought to our table was drinks.





This is illegal, as per new law inititated in, I believe, 2014.

If you see it, point it out to the server. If they refuse, write in a negative tip amount on the ticket and submit it. If they charge you anyway, file a dispute with your credit card provider.

It is illegal as a matter of Federal Law.



posted on Sep, 13 2015 @ 01:54 PM
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a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan

I didn't even think of Sonics (a hamburger joint/drive in where the "wait staff" bring your food directly to your car SOME still on roller skates).
I usually have to ask the kids for cash for THAT tip because I, like you, seldom have cash.

To the OP:
There are 7 of us when we go out to eat if it is just us and the fact that someone can serve all of us with a smile and get every order right is deserving of a reward IMO...
The cheapest meal would be about $140 or so and I think if one can afford that then one certainly can afford a decent tip.
Of course if the food were not good, one certainly could complain to the chef and still tip the wait staff decently, it wouldn't be THEIR fault if the food was not good.



posted on Sep, 13 2015 @ 01:54 PM
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originally posted by: WeRpeons
Unfortunately, tipping a waiter or waitress is expected in the U.S. Since the restaurant businesses in the U.S. doesn't pay their waitress or waiters a livable hourly wage. However, I think restaurants should be shouldering more of the responsibility for their servers salary. I will usually leave a 20% tip and seldom less than 15%.


The restaurant will not end up paying more, the diner will, it will just be built into the cost of food like in Europe.



posted on Sep, 13 2015 @ 01:56 PM
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originally posted by: wastedown
in the States wait staff do not get paid minimum wage. I am not sure of the exact amount but it is under 4$ per hour because they DEPEND on tips to survive.


Not always true . I know many restaurants that pay minimum wage and also what that state requires .

US Dept. of Labor

This is how it is broken down by states .
edit on 13-9-2015 by Stonecutter45 because: (no reason given)



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