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CERN LHC Glimpsed Into Another Dimension Today.. but wait, there's more!

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posted on Sep, 11 2015 @ 12:12 AM
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well that was today (yesterday in some time zones), in the 'World's Biggest Experiment' where the Large Hadron Collider at Cern in Switzerland recreated the conditions of the 'Big Bang' on this very day (yesterday in some time zones or by the time ur readin this!)

and well, apparently the'Large Hadron Collider is going to be turned back on next Wednesday! full blast or something? cuz its weird they' weren't worried/warning about the world ending today but yet question whether 'we're all gonna die next Wednesday'?!

Read more: www.dailymail.co.uk...

Are we all going to die next Wednesday?




The World's Biggest Experiment
The Large Hadron Collider at Cern in Switzerland plans recreate the conditions of the Big Band on 10th September...
The LHC was not designed to destroy the universe, of course, but to fill in some of the embarrassingly large gaps that still run through our basic understanding of physics and how the universe works.
It could discover, for instance, what most of the Universe is actually made of.
The ordinary 'stuff' that we see around us - the atoms and molecules of water, carbon, iron, oxygen and the rest that make up our bodies, the planet Earth, the Moon, the other planets, the Sun and all the stars - actually accounts for only about one part in 25 of the total 'ingredients' of the cosmos.
Astronomers know that something else, invisible and mysterious, must pervade every inch of space, its subtle gravity affecting the movements of the galaxy.
This material - no one really has a clue what it is - has been dubbed 'dark matter' and it is hoped that the collider just might shed some light on what it is, perhaps uncovering a new type of particle.
Perhaps more embarrassingly, we don't know what it is that gives even ordinary matter its mass.
In the 1960s, British physicist Peter Higgs proposed the existence of a new particle, now known as the 'Higgs Particle', which effectively lends 'weight' to the stuff of the universe.
So important and fundamental is this hypothetical entity that it has been dubbed the 'God particle'.
It is hoped that if Higgs is right, the collider could finally clear up this mystery and, as a result of its super-powerful collisions, traces of this particle could emerge.
That alone would, in itself, be justification for a large chunk of that £4 billion outlay. By simulating the Big Bang, it is hoped the LHC will act as a 'universe in a test tube', allowing scientists to examine a whole suite of exotic subatomic particles and forces and to go some way to completing the work started by Einstein and the other giants of 20th-century physics.
So is there really a chance that the scientists have made a terrible miscalculation and that their new toy could inadvertently kill us all?
Happily, the simple answer is no. CERN's scientists have in fact commissioned several safety reviews (such as those that have taken place before other big particle accelerators have been turned on).
All have concluded that there is no measurable risk whatsoever. Perhaps the best argument against the LHC doomsday scenario is that cosmic rays - natural high-energy particles from space - smash into the Earth's atmosphere all the time with far, far more energy than will be generated by this machine.
If it were possible to create a dangerous black hole by simply bashing atomic particles together, this would have happened naturally long ago, and we wouldn't be here to build this particle accelerator in the first place. So we are safe.
In fact, what the scientists at CERN really fear is not the end of the world, but that their machine simply isn't big or powerful enough to uncover anything new - that to probe the deepest secrets of the cosmos they will have to ask for yet more cash to build something on an even greater scale.
Either that, or their equations are simply wrong and a whole new approach is needed, despite the billions they have spent.
Not a doomsday for Earth, perhaps, but a catastrophe for physics.
As for the rest of us, we have to hope that the scientists have done their sums right - and keep our fingers crossed next Wednesday.


what about between today and next wednesday? doubt CERN will just be off line for a week!





posted on Sep, 11 2015 @ 12:17 AM
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originally posted by: Sovan



well that was today (yesterday in some time zones), in the 'World's Biggest Experiment' where the Large Hadron Collider at Cern in Switzerland recreated the conditions of the 'Big Bang' on this very day (yesterday in some time zones or by the time ur readin this!)

and well, apparently the'Large Hadron Collider is going to be turned back on next Wednesday! full blast or something? cuz its weird they' weren't worried/warning about the world ending today but yet question whether 'we're all gonna die next Wednesday'?!

WOT U M8?! Well, I would be pissed if a black hole opened up while my scone and pumpkin spice latte.

Read more: www.dailymail.co.uk...

Are we all going to die next Wednesday?




The World's Biggest Experiment
The Large Hadron Collider at Cern in Switzerland plans recreate the conditions of the Big Band on 10th September...
The LHC was not designed to destroy the universe, of course, but to fill in some of the embarrassingly large gaps that still run through our basic understanding of physics and how the universe works.
It could discover, for instance, what most of the Universe is actually made of.
The ordinary 'stuff' that we see around us - the atoms and molecules of water, carbon, iron, oxygen and the rest that make up our bodies, the planet Earth, the Moon, the other planets, the Sun and all the stars - actually accounts for only about one part in 25 of the total 'ingredients' of the cosmos.
Astronomers know that something else, invisible and mysterious, must pervade every inch of space, its subtle gravity affecting the movements of the galaxy.
This material - no one really has a clue what it is - has been dubbed 'dark matter' and it is hoped that the collider just might shed some light on what it is, perhaps uncovering a new type of particle.
Perhaps more embarrassingly, we don't know what it is that gives even ordinary matter its mass.
In the 1960s, British physicist Peter Higgs proposed the existence of a new particle, now known as the 'Higgs Particle', which effectively lends 'weight' to the stuff of the universe.
So important and fundamental is this hypothetical entity that it has been dubbed the 'God particle'.
It is hoped that if Higgs is right, the collider could finally clear up this mystery and, as a result of its super-powerful collisions, traces of this particle could emerge.
That alone would, in itself, be justification for a large chunk of that £4 billion outlay. By simulating the Big Bang, it is hoped the LHC will act as a 'universe in a test tube', allowing scientists to examine a whole suite of exotic subatomic particles and forces and to go some way to completing the work started by Einstein and the other giants of 20th-century physics.
So is there really a chance that the scientists have made a terrible miscalculation and that their new toy could inadvertently kill us all?
Happily, the simple answer is no. CERN's scientists have in fact commissioned several safety reviews (such as those that have taken place before other big particle accelerators have been turned on).
All have concluded that there is no measurable risk whatsoever. Perhaps the best argument against the LHC doomsday scenario is that cosmic rays - natural high-energy particles from space - smash into the Earth's atmosphere all the time with far, far more energy than will be generated by this machine.
If it were possible to create a dangerous black hole by simply bashing atomic particles together, this would have happened naturally long ago, and we wouldn't be here to build this particle accelerator in the first place. So we are safe.
In fact, what the scientists at CERN really fear is not the end of the world, but that their machine simply isn't big or powerful enough to uncover anything new - that to probe the deepest secrets of the cosmos they will have to ask for yet more cash to build something on an even greater scale.
Either that, or their equations are simply wrong and a whole new approach is needed, despite the billions they have spent.
Not a doomsday for Earth, perhaps, but a catastrophe for physics.
As for the rest of us, we have to hope that the scientists have done their sums right - and keep our fingers crossed next Wednesday.


what about between today and next wednesday? doubt CERN will just be off line for a week!




posted on Sep, 11 2015 @ 12:24 AM
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a reply to: Sovan

The LHC is not in the the correct configuration to cause a portal rift to hell. It can only open a portal rift to Detroit.

The iPhone 8, however...



posted on Sep, 11 2015 @ 12:26 AM
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originally posted by: Kratos40

and well, apparently the'Large Hadron Collider is going to be turned back on next Wednesday! full blast or something? cuz its weird they' weren't worried/warning about the world ending today but yet question whether 'we're all gonna die next Wednesday'?!


Well a black hole is all about gravity...a lot of it in a small space. About 20 times our own sun smashed down into the size of a large mountain, can CERN do that? Personally throwing atoms at each other I highly doubt there will be enough for a black hole to form...just saying..



posted on Sep, 11 2015 @ 12:26 AM
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I feel like I got punked by the way the first video ends...



posted on Sep, 11 2015 @ 12:27 AM
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originally posted by: chr0naut
a reply to: Sovan

The LHC is not in the the correct configuration to cause a portal rift to hell. It can only open a portal rift to Detroit.



So you are saying worst than hell...I'm worried now...



posted on Sep, 11 2015 @ 12:32 AM
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Maybe it's a glimpse of another time we are seeing, like John Titor said. John Titor CERN



posted on Sep, 11 2015 @ 12:37 AM
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a reply to: Sovan

The picture in that video looks like the inside of the collider tube. Maybe the sensor area where they are concentrating on the actual collisions. The guy narrating the vid actually says that these scientists are worshipping satan, so ...... He obviously doesn't know anything about what these technicians do or what these experiments are for. He's just a supersticious uneducated guy who went out and got a youtube channel so he could share his imagination stories with the world. This might as well be creepy pasta. At least it has sound effects sometimes.

You have to promise me that if we are not dead after they turn it on again, that you will start studying particle physics. Promise me!!



posted on Sep, 11 2015 @ 12:47 AM
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originally posted by: chr0naut
a reply to: Sovan

The LHC is not in the the correct configuration to cause a portal rift to hell. It can only open a portal rift to Detroit.

The iPhone 8, however...


The difference between Detroit and Hell? Sounds like you are playing a game of semantics.



posted on Sep, 11 2015 @ 12:57 AM
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originally posted by: OccamsRazor04

originally posted by: chr0naut
a reply to: Sovan

The LHC is not in the the correct configuration to cause a portal rift to hell. It can only open a portal rift to Detroit.

The iPhone 8, however...


The difference between Detroit and Hell? Sounds like you are playing a game of semantics.


Some people just want to watch the world burn.




posted on Sep, 11 2015 @ 01:14 AM
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I'm fairly educated.. at least I think I am... and one thing that concerns me about smashing particles together at high speeds...

Is nuclear fusion and fission...

What prevents that from occurring?



posted on Sep, 11 2015 @ 01:20 AM
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I think we have already created a gravimetic space/time hole. I only hope we get to our homely studios we call home....



posted on Sep, 11 2015 @ 01:50 AM
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originally posted by: Lucidparadox
I'm fairly educated.. at least I think I am... and one thing that concerns me about smashing particles together at high speeds...

Is nuclear fusion and fission...

What prevents that from occurring?
The amount of energy being released is incredibly minuscule.



posted on Sep, 11 2015 @ 01:50 AM
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i imagine cern being like that:

scientist 1:
what's that button for? let's see if we're gonna die after pressing it.

scientist 2: hm nothing really happened.

scientist 1: ok wait i'll turn it up more! tell me if the world ends please. just for protocol.



posted on Sep, 11 2015 @ 02:02 AM
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So its like Mcdonalds becoming Burger King?



posted on Sep, 11 2015 @ 02:06 AM
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Sorry I have a prepaid internet device, so I couldn't watch the videos. I would like to understand, what's with the dimension peering? I am extremely curios. If anyone could explain, it would surely be appreciated



posted on Sep, 11 2015 @ 02:07 AM
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Oh look, another YouTube video from somebody with absolutely no understanding of the actual physics of the LHC, preaching doom.

Well, if it's on YouTube, I guess it must be true.



posted on Sep, 11 2015 @ 03:51 AM
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I guess they were there when the "big bang" happened to know what the conditions were like.



posted on Sep, 11 2015 @ 04:10 AM
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originally posted by: Lucidparadox
I'm fairly educated.. at least I think I am... and one thing that concerns me about smashing particles together at high speeds...

Is nuclear fusion and fission...

What prevents that from occurring?


Fusion doesnt occur just by smashing things together. You need extreme heat or pressure. Fission is splitting of atoms ans requires neutrons.

And even if fusion did occur...so what?

Peoples misunderstanding of what the LHC can do is mind boggling. Oh no, its a big scary machine...it must be created to kill us all!!!
edit on 11-9-2015 by 3danimator2014 because: (no reason given)

edit on 11-9-2015 by 3danimator2014 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 11 2015 @ 04:52 AM
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originally posted by: Xtrozero

originally posted by: Kratos40

and well, apparently the'Large Hadron Collider is going to be turned back on next Wednesday! full blast or something? cuz its weird they' weren't worried/warning about the world ending today but yet question whether 'we're all gonna die next Wednesday'?!


Well a black hole is all about gravity...a lot of it in a small space. About 20 times our own sun smashed down into the size of a large mountain, can CERN do that? Personally throwing atoms at each other I highly doubt there will be enough for a black hole to form...just saying..



They do create micro miniature black holes. They last shorter than your processor uses for 1 waveform. And , fortunately for us , they dont have enough energy or gravitational to be self-sustaining .
A black hole is formed when a star much larger than our sun , and full of heavy metals,goes supernova . Then it collapses upon itself. Although the star is way , way smaller , as it did not lose its mass the gravitational field remains the same as when it was 1000 or more times larger. At that point , it warps space time fabric downward thus creating a black hole (better termed Gravity Well). Start to realize the energy needed? Versus what CERN can do equivalent to mosquitoes in flight ?
And models predict the Big Bang wasnt so much of a bang as it was an expansion



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