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Planning a road trip on the USA, looking for advice!

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posted on Sep, 8 2015 @ 12:17 AM
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Hello there,
Im posting to ask for advice.
I will be visiting the US prolly in march next year, and I'm planning on making a road trip from Miami to Philadelphia.
I thought it could be a good idea so I get a glimpse of a couple of cities and regions I've never visited before.
Later on I will stay in Philadelphia where I have relatives, so the journey from Miami to Philadephia should take me no more than 7 days (I will be renting a car).

The cities I wanna be visit for sure are Tampa, St. Augustine, Charleston and Baltimore. Now, since Ive only been to Miami, I'm not really sure if 7 days is enough time to do it all. I checked on google maps, and the whole journey takes about 20hs, so I'm guessing 7 days is a fairly good deal of time. But will I end up driving for 7 straight days, without any time to explore the cities I will be stopping by?

I need advice on this matter: Should I pick just a couple of cities and spend more time on fewer places, I dont want to spread myself to thin and end up regretting it all.
How much of a good idea do you think this is in general? Doing a road trip from Florida to Pennsylvania? I'm also interested in visiting small towns, non-turistic places, and see a bit of the life on the southern of the USA. I really like american culture, and love run of the mill places, which may seem uninteresting to americans, so bear that in mind. Sleeping in motels, having lunch at taco bell, stopping for a snack at a 7-eleven, the regular stuff.

Finally, If you have any tips on interesting places or routes I should take, I wanna hear them! Actually I'm not sure If I should follow the coast, or take the route that runs through Columbia and Charlotte.

Thanks for reading!
edit on 8 9 15 by payta because: typo




posted on Sep, 8 2015 @ 12:48 AM
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Florida to Pennsylvania. You'll be passing through the Carolinas. Find a route that takes you through the Smoky Mountain range. Bring a camera. There is some gorgeous scenery.



posted on Sep, 8 2015 @ 01:11 AM
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a reply to: skunkape23

Thanks, Will do then!
Thought the famous appalachians should be awe inspiring



posted on Sep, 8 2015 @ 01:21 AM
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originally posted by: payta
a reply to: skunkape23

Thanks, Will do then!
Thought the famous appalachians should be awe inspiring

Never passed through the Appalachians. I know a guy that hiked the trail from one end to the other and back. He said it was awesome.
I love the Arkansas Ozarks, but that is a little off your path and you get out into some pretty primitive roads to see the good stuff.



posted on Sep, 8 2015 @ 01:53 AM
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a reply to: skunkape23

How common are motels by the side of the road in general, would you say I'd have trouble finding accommodation, should I book in advance? I would rather not in order to keep an open scheduled, wanna travel freely taking it all in



posted on Sep, 8 2015 @ 02:22 AM
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First, learn proper English - It's : "Planning a road trip in the USA", or "Planning a road trip to the USA", or something like that.

But don't worry about, most of the people on ATS do not write proper English either.



posted on Sep, 8 2015 @ 02:38 AM
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originally posted by: nOraKat
First, learn proper English - It's : "Planning a road trip in the USA", or "Planning a road trip to the USA", or something like that.

But don't worry about, most of the people on ATS do not write proper English either.


First of, are all of your +1,000 posts this helpful?
Of all that long OP that's the only mistake you spotted, I'm definitely getting better at this.

edit on 8 9 15 by payta because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 8 2015 @ 03:00 AM
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No but really, if you stay on the highway, it is pretty featureless and boring.

If you have to drive 20 hours total, then if you drive 5-6 hours a day (you prob don't want to do any more than that), you will be driving 4 of the days, which leaves only 3 free days, so try to make the stops in interesting places.

I haven't explored too much of the south, but when I drove through New England, I would say some of the most interesting scenery was in back country roads. So while I don't know where I was going, I would occasionally exit the highway, and instead take some small country roads which were going in my general direction, looking for interesting places.

I like natural places so I would probably visit State and National parks, like the Everglades and the Great Smokey Mountains (but many black bears in some parts). Georgia and the Carolinas prob. have some beautiful places. I'm sure a little Googling would bring up plenty of suggestions wherever you are. As far as motels I don't think you will find much trouble finding places and don't think you need any reservations. Again Google maps is your friend there. Book rooms through travel sites for discounts as opposed to walking right in. In National Parks, I'd just camp out.

Sorry for nothing specific.



posted on Sep, 8 2015 @ 03:04 AM
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a reply to: payta
Hey cmon, I was busy writing this reply for you.. I'm just messin w ya. Hope you enjoy your trip.



posted on Sep, 8 2015 @ 03:28 AM
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a reply to: nOraKat

Gee, thanks a lot for the reply.
I'm just starting to plan this, and I'm a little bit overwhelmed. Looks like there's a lot to do, and a great deal of interesting places to stop by.
I'm definitely thinking of spending two days at St. Augustine, and maybe going there directly from Miami without stopping anywhere else. I'm curious about the coast of the gulf of Mexico, but I'm guessing it'll leave me very little time for the carolinas and Virginia.

Actually my initial plan is to take the road that goes by the coast right up to Charleston, and then turn west to Columbia and Charlotte. That way I'll get to travel half the journey by the coast, and half by the mountains.



posted on Sep, 8 2015 @ 05:18 AM
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I suggest a quick stop at St. Mary's, Georga, the sleepy little town is the gateway to Cumberland island. Also Ocracoke island in North Carolina. Both are coastal islands with a lost in time feeling. Good luck on the trip, I find planning is half the fun.



posted on Sep, 8 2015 @ 05:21 AM
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Ive never been there myself but in the movies taking the wrong turn could cause problems lol😃,only advice I could give is have fun and stay save a reply to: payta



posted on Sep, 8 2015 @ 05:22 AM
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a reply to: payta

If you plan on going up I95, which runs the length of the coast, you will see the same tourist stuff along the way. Any built up area will look very similar.

March is not the best time for much of the US scenic wise. It may be nicer in Miami, but the rest of the country is coming out of winter. So a lot of the greenery will be missing the further north you go. Most of the mountain stuff will still be closed (a lot opens in the spring or has reduced hours) Charlotte is nowhere near the mountains by the way. You'll have to go much more west to see them. That said, I think there is more "real" America in the mountains rather than the coast which, like i said, is more homogenized. Most of Florida looks like one giant strip mall. I would stop at Cape Canaveral/Kennedy space center on your way up north. It's worth seeing the rockets and stuff and March is a good time for most of Florida. Driving through/around Jacksonville Florida at night is nice. It is a pretty city at night. Charleston is nice i hear, although i have never been there. Now you have a choice veer far west to Mountains. I would still do it, although much of the grandeur won't have grown by March. Asheville NC is a nice place to visit. I like it there. Stay in downtown DC one day and visit a couple museums and walk around the monuments. Definitely worth seeing. I would park the car at a hotel and take taxis everywhere. Fairly reasonable and will save the feet and the tiredness from all the walking you will do. North of Virginia i don't know much. It's full of Yankees.


V

edit on 9/8/2015 by Variable because: took out a V



posted on Sep, 8 2015 @ 05:39 AM
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I wish you were coming to Illinois, although I know that's far out of your way. Here where I now live, we have some....interesting sites. A company, trying to improve tourism, has started building "The World's Largest" in an assortment of things, all verified by Guinness. We have the world's largest pencil, golf tee, knitting needles, wind chimes and they just recently completed the world's largest rocking chair. It. Is. HUGE.
This is the base, but like I said, it's now completed


www.illinoishomepage.net...



posted on Sep, 8 2015 @ 08:40 AM
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My thought is that the weather in the US in March is anybody's guess. Could be sunny and springlike up North, could be 2 feet of snow, or ice storms as far south as Georgia. You might have to have alternate plans depending on weather. In other words, come to Miami, and maybe spend more time in Florida/Georgia if the weather up North is questionable. If weather looks good, then have a plan to take you up toward the Smokey Mountains, etc.

You mentioned Tampa, which is more gulf coast Florida. So why not consider taking 75 West near Everglades, and taking the west coast up, poking around the touristy towns along the way up toward Tampa. To me, Tampa is just a city, I don't find much special to see there. But I like outdoors, natural scenery, smaller towns, history rather than nightlife and big buildings


After Tampa, you could cut back over to the East coast of Florida. Again, not sure what is in Jacksonville itself. I wouldn't go there, just pass through.

Savannah, I've never been, but sounds lovely, and Charleston.

Washington DC, it's great to see the monuments and museums. Baltimore, okay not sure what you'd want to see there, I'd drive on. I think Philadelphia is a much more interesting city from a visitor/tourist perspective.

You can order online materials from each of the states' tourist boards. Yes, you can see it all online, but sometimes it's fun to get maps and brochures in the mail and browse through them at you leisure over a cup of tea/coffee or pint.

If it were my trip, I'd stay south if weather is bad, and if weather looks good, I'd want to see the Smokey Mountains (around Asheville, North Carolina) myself. I've never been there and it's on my dream travel list.

But mountains in snow and ice would not be fun driving or sightseeing.

Also, in the South, you have to consider "spring break" and that tons of students will be partying and taking up a lot of motel rooms, especially at beach towns in parts of Florida. And families traveling with kids during their spring break from school.


Good luck!



posted on Sep, 8 2015 @ 11:16 AM
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a reply to: payta

As a long time trucker, I've had the opportunity to see as much of the U.S. as anybody out there.

A lot depends on what you like. I would avoid Baltimore totally. Few redeeming qualities at the best of times and these days....well think of it as a plague city. LOL.

Probably the jewel of the fifty states is Virginia. Drop dead gorgeous. Then into Pa.. Many historic and beautiful locations.

Really it's hard to go wrong in any direction but the Appalachians are a can't miss.



posted on Sep, 8 2015 @ 11:36 AM
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Nothing specific, but in general I'd recommend staying off the highways as much as possible. You can drive from one end of the country to another and if you stay on the highways, you'll have this image of the US being one long chain of McDonald's, Pizza Huts and WalMarts. You've got to get off the Interstates if you want to really see anything.

On that note, just to give you some perspective, I highly recommend the book Blue Highways. Again, not for trip specific practical advice (since it was written in 1982) but it'll help get your head in the space it should be in to do some exploring on the back roads, which is where you need to be.

I agree the Appalachians are one of the most beautiful areas of the country. There are some great areas in Pennsylvania as well. The Poconos northeast of Philadelphia are awesome. Disclaimer - I'm not a fan of cities and prefer mountains to the seashore. Your bliss may lie elsewhere.



posted on Sep, 8 2015 @ 11:48 AM
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a reply to: payta

Whatever you do, where ever you go. . . drive the posted speed limit.

Rental car driving around in the south to the north?

You're a target.



posted on Sep, 8 2015 @ 11:50 AM
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a reply to: payta

I would say try to incorporate the Chesapeake Bay Bridge/Tunnel as part of your route. It's a magnificent ride. The Bridge/Tunnel combo is about 12 miles long and when you are at the midpoint, all you see is ocean in all directions. Fantastic!



posted on Sep, 8 2015 @ 12:15 PM
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a reply to: eluryh22
That's weird... I live 20 minutes away from that bridge.
@OP: the ONLY thing I can recommend is Richmond, VA, the rest of the area sucks.



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