It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

My experiment is working!! (No-maintenance yard)

page: 1
12
<<   2 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Sep, 6 2015 @ 03:50 PM
link   
Okay, so - this is just an anecdote, but I was really excited and wanted to share it with you all.

About 4 years ago I stopped mowing the backyard (we didn't have a suitable mower). A couple of years later, I decided to let the brush and hedge-row trees go....so my yard is now nearly surrounded by a natural visual screen....

and for 25 years, I have focused my landscaping on attracting important species, like bees and butterflies.

I've consistently had humming birds, other song-birds, and owls. Sometimes I can see a red-tailed hawk.

Over the last couple of years I have seen fewer and fewer butterflies (not the legions like there used to be), and haven't seen a Monarch in two years that I can recall.

Today, however - TODAY -
I was sitting on my patio gazing at the tree canopy and sky, and a Golden Eagle flew over. Now, I had seen a similar (if not the very same) Eagle last summer and the summer before (sitting on a neighbor's roof, no less!).....but not any Monarchs.

The honeybees have been around, due to clover and stuff.

And AFTER THAT, today, I went to switch out the dog-water, and there was a Monarch Caterpillar!!!!

Sadly, it had already expired. But, it gave me a hopeful feeling. I never use pesticides on my lawn, or fertilizers. I mow about 6 times over a year. My yard is mostly Creeping Charlie, clover, moss, vinca, wild strawberries, violets, and a few bits of grass.

Some people might feel that is "slovenly" and "trashy" - but, I have Eagles and Monarchs hanging around.. Hummingbirds, and Honeybees, and toads and frogs....

And I'm fine with that.....

Anyway, just wanted to share.


STOP watering, fertilizing, and mowing your hard....it helps the environment in so many, many ways.


edit on 9/6/2015 by BuzzyWigs because: (no reason given)




posted on Sep, 6 2015 @ 04:00 PM
link   
Very nice, and congratulations on your knowledge and caring for natural foliage. Most people in the U.S. are unaware that the grass that they see everywhere, covering lawns from sea to shining sea, isn't natural to the U.S. The entire lawn-care community in the U.S. is based on plants which are not native to their area (or country!).



posted on Sep, 6 2015 @ 04:03 PM
link   
For us city folk that would not work. The city would mow your lawn for you and send you a hefty bill.

But glad to hear about your experience.



posted on Sep, 6 2015 @ 04:04 PM
link   

originally posted by: BuzzyWigs

STOP watering, fertilizing, and mowing your hard....it helps the environment in so many, many ways.



I'd love to do that ... but would not want the fire hazard it would make.



posted on Sep, 6 2015 @ 04:11 PM
link   
a reply to: introvert

Oh, but see, in my city it (the lawn) just can't be over 8" tall (of course, that's only when the 'neighbors' complain). So, I pull out all the grass and the taller perennial weeds, leaving only the low-growing ones.

The next season, there are way fewer 'tall' weeds.
It takes years of plodding along (without digging up the entire yard), but, it works.



posted on Sep, 6 2015 @ 04:14 PM
link   
a reply to: Aleister

And so they require excessive watering, fertilizers, and specific pesticides applied to where the person decided to plant them.

Covering in winter, coddling, etc. My MO has always been...
"There. I planted you. I might not water you every day, and I won't spray you for bugs or slugs or fungus. Either sink, or swim." (And I say it sternly, while pointing a castigating finger at them....)

So - they do, or they don't.
Oh, also - in my 'yard' I have Black Walnuts, Blackberries, Grapes, Wild Strawberries, Thyme, Oregano, Basil, and various medicinal native species.
Lots of worms and other things....we won't starve. (Plus, my husband knows how to hunt small game...etc.) All sorts of timber and brush, throughout the year, to burn for warmth or provide shelter for wildlife.



edit on 9/6/2015 by BuzzyWigs because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 6 2015 @ 04:51 PM
link   
a reply to: BuzzyWigs

I've been trying to convince my SO to let me permaculture the lawn for YEARS!! I told him, let me convert a large patch to creeping time and we'll see how we like it, but he just isn't convinced "it will feel nice to walk on". Urgh. We both hate mowing, I'm hoping to wear him down soon and welcome the flora and fauna in full, as you have!



posted on Sep, 6 2015 @ 05:18 PM
link   
I mow my yard every spring and maybe once in the summer to keep the ferns and trees from taking over the clearing. I time the mowing to between flowers that bloom in the yard. I have to have a frog spotter when I mow, lots of tree frogs and toads live in it. My granddaughter walks around with a portable aquarium and picks them up ahead of the mower.. She usually gets between six and twelve frogs then leaves them out when we are done.

I like nature. The reason they started mowing is because some people had allergies to stuff like ragweed. That is still the case. also pollen from lots of flowering plants bothers different people. But people still plant flowers and the same problem exists and nobody made that illegal to do. More people are allergic to plants people plant in their flower gardens than plants out in the wild.



posted on Sep, 6 2015 @ 05:18 PM
link   

originally posted by: BuzzyWigs
a reply to: introvert

Oh, but see, in my city it (the lawn) just can't be over 8" tall (of course, that's only when the 'neighbors' complain). So, I pull out all the grass and the taller perennial weeds, leaving only the low-growing ones.

The next season, there are way fewer 'tall' weeds.
It takes years of plodding along (without digging up the entire yard), but, it works.



way-to-go... I mowed 4 X this year so far... I hope the end of Sept will do it for the year

the gardens take up a lot of area, but 1/2 the front yard I had to smother with pine straw to keep the green stuff out but have an esthetic yard... I will use pine straw on the as-yet grassy-weedy 6' border that has bushes on that same side of the house after the watermelons are finished growing/ watered from the roof drippings-runoffs

I have landscaped the 1/4 acre lot to have grass only on strategic areas, mostly determined by the 'time' required to mows the stuff... I have mainly a 30'x30' south side yard bounded by a 'L' shaped mini grape vineyard on the South
and a 30'x 60' area on the North side( requiring a lawn mower/string trimmer) with a stand of 5 pine trees and 5 live oaks which are not covered in grass lawn but rather in a several inch layer of oak leaves &/or mulch

in 3 years I converted the country club , patchy lawn into a low maintenance landscape with a minimalist lawn which I weed often and compost regularly to keep that tall growth at a scarcity


good luck on you endeavors

edit on th30144157812406222015 by St Udio because: (no reason given)


 



hey rickymouse... that's the complaint in AZ.... all the retirees brought all their air polluting flowers/greenery with them to AZ where in the '60s we were told to 'bring your sinuses to the desert clean air !" ha ha ha


...More people are allergic to plants people plant in their flower gardens than plants out in the wild.


edit on th30144157854106292015 by St Udio because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 6 2015 @ 05:33 PM
link   
a reply to: Atsbhct

gasp! It not only "feels nice", it SMELLS NICE!!!

Tell him I said he's mistaken.



posted on Sep, 6 2015 @ 05:34 PM
link   
1+ acre in the SW high desert no maintenance except for the garden in raspberrys and asparagus. Native plants and animals; beautiful!



posted on Sep, 6 2015 @ 05:35 PM
link   
a reply to: St Udio

Yay!! I know, it's a long process...but I've been working on it for years.



posted on Sep, 6 2015 @ 05:54 PM
link   
This is awesome. If I didn't live in a city which required a certain degree of maintenance, and wasn't allergic to stings, I would totally do this. I love the fact that you acquire more fulfillment and awe from the creatures cohabiting with you in your yard than from the yard itself.


Peace.



posted on Sep, 7 2015 @ 02:57 PM
link   
Oh! Oh oh...was just out there, and thought I should add:
I don't rake, either!! And, my yard is totally covered by a tree canopy. 1/3+ acre.....


Thanks for reading, guys



posted on Sep, 7 2015 @ 04:43 PM
link   
I would do that for the part where the fruit-trees grow, only needs a cut 2 times a year.
Another part i cut once every week/ 2 weeks in summer. Don't really mind mowing, most of the time i'm in the garden anyway.
The grass cuttings also adds some nutrients to the soil.

Tall grass attracts critters which is good for the pollination, if you have fruits and veggies growing.
But you also get more ticks, which i'm not to fond off(who is). Might be a thing to consider if you have kids and/or pets running around. So the section where they often play is always smooth cut

Ooh and it's also easier to clean dog poo when the grass is short



posted on Sep, 7 2015 @ 04:58 PM
link   
a reply to: BuzzyWigs
Sounds like a good place to have tea parties....If I were you I would probably make a small clearing for a small Victorian iron chairs and a gothic baroque style table.



posted on Sep, 7 2015 @ 05:23 PM
link   
a reply to: BuzzyWigs

In which state do you live?
Where do you live (urban, semi-rural, rural)?
How much acreage do you have?

I live in a mostly rural area. I have 20 acres, so wildlife is a natural part of where I live. I just can't go without mowing the yard, it drives me nuts, and it takes 5 hours to cut everything. I can't stand walking around in the yard if the grass it 2 feet tall and knocking my legs. I keep the bushes trimmed because they take over the sidewalk. I have to regularly tend to other things, or else the wisteria takes over. And when trees and limbs fall... That said, this place is more or less a wildlife habitat. I see red tail hawks regularly, I feed the deer so they hand around and act like pets (they even feed safe here, sleeping in the yard, etc. Sometimes I see foxes, turkeys. Always frogs, toads, snakes, turtles, hummingbirds, bees, butterflies, squirrels, rabbits, other song birds because of the feeders, and finches.

As I was cutting grass today, I saw a Monarch in the grass, in the shade, and he was trying fly but couldn't. I don't know if it was because was cooler and he was in the shade,but I stopped, picked him up, and a few seconds later he spread his wings and flew away. I like to think I gave him a spark of energy or warmth to enjoy the day.

I don't water the lawn (only the garden) and I only fertilize in the spring to prevent weeds.

I'm glad you're enjoying what you're doing, though.
Personally, I just don't think I could handle a jungle for a yard. :/

But wildlife is awesome.






posted on Sep, 7 2015 @ 05:59 PM
link   
a reply to: Liquesence


In which state do you live?
Northeast Kansas along the Missouri River part of the 'boundary.'

Where do you live (urban, semi-rural, rural)?
Semi-rural.


How much acreage do you have?

Only a bit over a third of an acre. But within 100 yards to my north, we have unimproved natural terrain.



posted on Sep, 7 2015 @ 09:50 PM
link   
This thread is an inspiration!!!

We're suburban dwellers...with a rather small lot to tend...and due to the subdivision....we keep the grass cut....but use organic fertilizer and only enough to keep the grass happy.

My garden though has gotten a lot more natural....it's about the size of a car and a half garage.

I took out most of the roses, and more or less naturalized the garden.

I now have small flowering shrubs, perennial salvia, sedum, several kinds hostas, ferns, several kids of rubeckia, tallish coreopsis, and tall cone flowers. The last two are for the finches.....they get really happy now that they are in seed....I used to deadhead everything, until I realized I was taking food away from birds.
With a few tomato plants for us and the squirrels to share.
I also have a couple of birdfeeders...we get woodpeckers, cardinals, robins, red winged blackbirds, blue jays, sparrow, chickadees, two kinds of finch, hummingbirds, mourning doves, and too damn many pigeons.

Also, Cooper's hawks visit....at lunch time


Bunnies, too many of them....occasional opossums....and once a small groundhog visited.

Several kinds of bees and butterflies....and an occasional hummingbird moth....and dragonflies.



posted on Sep, 7 2015 @ 10:11 PM
link   
a reply to: DontTreadOnMe

I hope the rest of the country catches up....glad to hear you've got a menagerie going there!!!

We have snakes and moles, too - but one of our cats is great at catching those......she brings the snakes in to play with them (one time one of them got away and was found a couple of weeks later under the dishwasher - 10 times bigger).....

but she always just leaves the moles outside....gifts. You know.

It's a regular ecosystem around here.



new topics

top topics



 
12
<<   2 >>

log in

join