It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

The Urban Philospher - Essays on the Human Condition

page: 1
2

log in

join
share:

posted on Sep, 6 2015 @ 01:36 PM
link   
Most writers find themselves at one point or another writing about the human condition. Whether it is the result of observing others or deep introspection into ones own most visceral working, we all end up making observations about humanity and committing them to print.

I would like to start a thread here for exactly that purpose. If you have random musings, cogent observations, gut feelings about society, individuals, group-think, collective personality, whatever - this is the place to share it and invite others to add to it, or offer their own version or experience.

I have always considered myself a sort of Urban Philosopher. I watch people, individuals or groups, study trends in behavior, explore the reasoning behind the events I witness, and hope to understand not only the world around me but perhaps myself a little better as well.

I started a piece some time ago, quite some time ago actually, after some rather personal tragedies befell my family and myself. I made sure the credit for the work was mine, then began to share it. I enjoyed, and was often amazed at some of the responses I received. I would like to start the thread by offering that same piece to you, the talented writers of ATS.


“Whereas in darkness light becomes more easily detected, so then does illusion make ready the discovery of truth.” ~Vroomfondel~

What mysterious power lies within tragic loss that compels us to inventory and catalog ourselves? As catastrophic tragedy is relative, it is through our own fiendish devices and machinations that we cultivate our emotion - and tolerance thereto. Whether it be smothering sorrow or transcendent joy, it is the degree of our emotion that defines our soul and the manner in which we govern it the measure of our character.

Each person borne to this earth does possess an intangible quality that allows them to 'become'. Our identity is forged through trial and error. The final form of which is the end result of a lifetime of transient anomalous experiences chipping away that which is not our true self. It can therefore be argued that our sense of identity is the culmination of a process of elimination. Removing that which is not of our true self and retaining that which is does not in itself bring light into darkness. We have not defined, but only suggested, who we truly are. At the end of our journey the only thing we have clearly identified is who we are not.

We will never know who we are as well as who we were.

It is only in retrospect, in the eyes of others, that 'we' become clear.

That is the light in the darkness where illusion gives way to truth.




posted on Sep, 6 2015 @ 01:40 PM
link   
I have no idea what im reading?



posted on Sep, 6 2015 @ 01:42 PM
link   
a reply to: yulka

I'm sorry to hear that.



posted on Sep, 6 2015 @ 01:43 PM
link   
a reply to: Vroomfondel

You want to write real philosophY?



posted on Sep, 6 2015 @ 01:46 PM
link   
a reply to: yulka

"Most writers find themselves at one point or another writing about the human condition. Whether it is the result of observing others or deep introspection into ones own most visceral working, we all end up making observations about humanity and committing them to print.

I would like to start a thread here for exactly that purpose."

I think that is fairly clear regarding intent...



posted on Sep, 6 2015 @ 01:48 PM
link   
a reply to: Vroomfondel

Well thats anthropology,think the title is misleading.



posted on Sep, 6 2015 @ 02:07 PM
link   
As the bombs began to fall all that could be heard was the clicking of a mouse as it ran across a desk, and the rattling of a wheel as it rolled on down the road.



posted on Sep, 6 2015 @ 02:24 PM
link   
a reply to: kenzohattori69

Pity. It was a simple suggestion to start some conversations about the human condition and the philosophical musings of those who would enjoy some conversation on the subject.

So let me offer this:

Trolls - what is their motivation? Why do they believe they have the right, no responsibility, to torpedo a persons efforts at offering a medium in which expanding and understanding the motives, emotions, and outcomes of the choices we make in life?

Is being a troll desirable because it requires no real intellect, just semi-targeted attacks from an anonymous identify from a safe distance on people with good intentions?

Or is it because the true nature of the human condition of trolls is to enjoy inflicting injury on others and find some deviant pleasure in their suffering through some childish depravity?



posted on Sep, 6 2015 @ 02:47 PM
link   
a reply to: yulka

phi•los•o•phy
(fɪˈlɒs ə fi)

n., pl. -phies.
1. the rational investigation of the truths and principles of being, knowledge, or conduct.

There are more than one interpretation of some things. I agree, anthropology would also fit the bill quite well. However, my goal was to explore more than just the customs and beliefs of people, but to include the philosophical thoughts on some observable characteristics currently being displayed by various members of society.

I tried to be more accommodating to various ideas and input rather than fine-lining the narrow perspective to which responses must be oriented.

Perhaps I overestimated the abilities of those to whom I proferred.

Question - if the title had been Urban Anthropology, would it have made a difference?


edit on 6-9-2015 by Vroomfondel because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 6 2015 @ 03:13 PM
link   
a reply to: Vroomfondel

Naah not really, when trying to display characteristics of members of society, most hold the same ideals. Im not that into fine words of name calling, i just say, reality is one way, fantasy is the other way.
When i want to ask a question to someone who is smarter i go into the physics section. =)



posted on Sep, 6 2015 @ 03:44 PM
link   
a reply to: yulka

I respect that.

My original observation was that after some tragic event people always tend to look more closely and critically at themselves and wonder if they are what they should be. I just witnessed this and it struck a familiar chord with my own past when I did something very similar after a few tragic events that impacted my family and myself. It made me wonder why people take some tragic event and turn it into a deep introspection that inevitably ends up with them being less than satisfied with themselves. Like they didn't have enough to think about already. Is it some form of survivor guilt? Or fear of not achieving? Is it the reminder of our mortality that makes us question our choices? Why do we look most critically at ourselves during the most traumatic events of our lives when we should be trying to heal ourselves and each other?



posted on Sep, 6 2015 @ 04:18 PM
link   
a reply to: Vroomfondel Pity? I can't see how it applies? It definitely was not my intent to troll you, I wouldn't know where to start. That's just me though.



posted on Sep, 7 2015 @ 12:05 PM
link   
a reply to: kenzohattori69

If you were as smart as you try to act, you would know to start at the beginning...philosophically speaking that is...



posted on Sep, 8 2015 @ 10:39 AM
link   
I believe you have a good idea here, and hope others respond accordingly.

The more I think, the more I introspect . . .the more I "do" wonder if I've become what I should be.

But then, what should I be . . . other than what I am.

A lot of "what-ifs", like water under the bridge.

Forks in the road, that kind of stuff.



posted on Sep, 8 2015 @ 10:52 AM
link   
a reply to: Vroomfondel
Why do you insist on objective observations?



posted on Sep, 8 2015 @ 08:17 PM
link   
a reply to: SIEGE

Thank you. It was only an attempt at starting a conversation about something I have witnessed a few times and was curious about what others thought.

(que the target shooters and antagonists)



posted on Sep, 8 2015 @ 08:22 PM
link   
a reply to: Mousygretchen

I don't necessarily insist on then. In this case, that is what it happened to be. Not that other perspectives aren't welcome, they are. I am taking a repeating event, in myself and others, and applying the great, "Why?" I do want to know what it is about some tragedy that takes us away from healing ourselves and each other and directs our thoughts toward self doubt, questioning our accomplishments, our self esteem, our sense of self worth. Or is that the method of healing itself? To question your self worth, then find a way to bolster it and heal through the understanding? And what happens to the people who don't find the bolster they need when they need it?



posted on Sep, 8 2015 @ 08:27 PM
link   
a reply to: Vroomfondel
You're saying self esteem wavers, goes up and down like a roller coaster. I don't doubt or question myself. Although sometimes I come up with a lot of thoughts that I believe are true and turn out not to be. Sometimes I cant trust my emotions, and if im ever feeling down I know ill feel better sooner or later.



posted on Sep, 9 2015 @ 08:15 AM
link   
a reply to: Mousygretchen

Its not so much that all self esteem waivers, its that it can be brought into doubt and inspected for flaws, so to speak. Some people, like yourself apparently, do not feel their self esteem changes. That is a good thing. And you find peace in the idea that sooner or later you will feel better. But what about the people who reach a point where it seems like they will never feel better? When that tragedy turns their gaze inward and instead of finding a solid foundation on which to base a recovery, they find cracks, real or imagines, that weaken their emotional foundation even more. Why do people look at themselves so critically in the midst of some tragedy when they should be finding ways to heal themselves and each other, and why do they wait until they are deep in some tragic event they had no control over to start their introspection? My observation was that they don't intentionally wait until there is a tragic event to start some period of introspection, but that the tragic event itself is the catalyst that initiates the introspection. My question is why? What is it about tragedy that makes us turn inward and in some ways against ourselves?




top topics



 
2

log in

join