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'Inventive Spelling' in Modern Curriculum: Deliberate 'Dumbing Down' of America's Future

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posted on Sep, 5 2015 @ 11:31 PM
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@1:11

Seriously? No wonder children nowadays write so sloppily and poorly. I remember struggling to get my penmanship presentable. Especially being a lefty and inclined to as my parents would say, 'curl my hand over like a cripple'. would often erase and re-write to get my homework decent enough to turn in to teacher.

i dont see any effort to write neatly in today's children, overall. it seems the world is all about quantity nowadays and little to nothing about quality. most couples around here have like 4-5 children each. i can understand how it could be hard to concentrate on individualized adequate attention for each of all. children nowadays seem raised on video games and video/cameras, more than anything else.

oh and i feel like the word 'awesome' used to mean something totally different than it does nowadays. didn't it? obviously i myself skip caps but that's just yapping online.




posted on Sep, 5 2015 @ 11:41 PM
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a reply to: Sovan

Creationism taught in many American schools is another reason why our education system is going down the drain.




posted on Sep, 6 2015 @ 01:54 AM
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a reply to: starwarsisreal

Well, that didn't take long. Seriously? I can come up with several more important issues as to why the education system is being dumbed down. What's dumb is not presenting students with all the information.



posted on Sep, 6 2015 @ 02:17 AM
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a reply to: Sovan

That video is beyond disturbing. I've believed for a long time that there is an intentional dumbing down of children. Generation after generation is slowly forgetting their history. Schools and government are increasing their effort to destroy the family unit. I have a niece that's only a few years away from entering the school system. I fear for her mind. I'm hoping to see her homeschooled or enrolled into a private school. Fighting through all the indoctrination, misinformation, and the deliberate desire to drug children isn't something that's easily fought.


edit on 9/6/2015 by EternalSolace because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 6 2015 @ 02:43 AM
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a reply to: Sovan

Even in my lifetime I have seen the deliberate dumbing down of it. comparing the standard of questions for the GCE I sat to the GCSEs today its obvious the old GCE were closer to the A level standard than whatever equivalent it is today
AS levels. Kids are coming out of school all with A* or whatever, but talk to some of them and ask even a simple question of an A* English student and they can't spell, the writing can be atrocious and they also can't write a decent letter. OK everything is done by computer, and we need AI intelligence to think for us now but is this really the way to go if our grids ever go down? Imagine if AI introduced a virus we couldn't correct into the internet - we'd be stuffed instantly unless we had older people and well educated people around to pick up the pen quickly.

Personally I would hang the dink who invented multiple choice because it robbed kids of the ability to think for themselves, puzzle and reason a solution. They don't even need to write the answer, just gamble on a tick. Good education that.

This liberal attitude needs to be taken out of teacher's education - these people know ultimately they are failing our kids. Its not their place to love and pander them, its their job purely to get information and the ability to think into their heads. Parents have been made deliberately impotent, especially those who question this new system of fail.

Its political simply because the ignorant can't object so easily or express themselves to question politicians and say no to things they don't agree with. Easy crowd control for the elite who give funding to education in order to protect them and their families ultimately and keep an ignorant workforce which includes human labour and soldiers.

Parents have a role though and they need to fight these low standards. Kids aren't brighter today but in the UK they are pampered into higher grades than many deserve and it shows when they hit the workplace, unless they are particularly switched on.

Your video horrifies me as my Grandaughter starts school tomorrow for her first time.



posted on Sep, 6 2015 @ 06:34 AM
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It was in the UK at least when the government decided every child should go on to college and university (to keep them off the unemployment rolls and to start getting them in debt), and frankly every child could not hack that.

So rather than accept that not every child could hack it, they just dumbed down, and now the New Universities are handing out qualifications that aren't worth the paper they are printed on. And we have legions of functionally illiterate 'graduates'.

Madness.

In America it looks a lot more sinister though, America truly feels like the agenda is to create a stupid populace so as they don't start asking difficult questions of the elites.



posted on Sep, 6 2015 @ 06:41 AM
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We are so boned.

The introductory quote is interesting, though- again, the decline of everything took place once the central banks took over.



posted on Sep, 6 2015 @ 07:30 AM
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Where is this "death ED" being taught, to which age groups, and what's the purpose of it? Heck, I was deep into existential crisis from a young age, but wouldn't dare try to force such issues on my supposed peers at the time.

The video seemed like a propaganda piece in and of itself, it just felt very biased, but there's obviously serious dysfunction with the educational system in the US. I can't point to any one reason, but the bleeding hearts are definitely mucking some things up. They're obviously just being used as pawns in a larger game, but that doesn't stop the fact that their "care" is screwing things up pretty bad.
edit on 6-9-2015 by pl3bscheese because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 6 2015 @ 07:34 AM
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a reply to: Shiloh7

Teachers have to do as they are told, as funding is based on gov policy & initiatives.
Establishments need the govs money to offer the dumbing service to learners.
Teachers are people too. they are subject to all that society offers to/inflicts on everyone else.
Don't blame them for the failings of the kids.
The govs make the policy & initiatives that are indicative to funding.
Teachers don't have the autonomy you seem to think they have.
They are told what to teach, what methods to use & who to teach to.
I was an English teacher in a London college. I recently left the profession as my role, authority & autonomy degraded beyond my acceptance.
I'm sorry that teachers are seen as the scapegoats for gov policies & decisions.
The majority of teachers are good people who start with the best intentions.
Most that leave will never stop caring about the education of our country.
All of the above is related to state funded mainstream education in the UK.

If I have misunderstood you I do sincerely apologise.

Thank you OP



posted on Sep, 6 2015 @ 08:30 AM
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originally posted by: Painterz
It was in the UK at least when the government decided every child should go on to college and university (to keep them off the unemployment rolls and to start getting them in debt), and frankly every child could not hack that.

So rather than accept that not every child could hack it, they just dumbed down, and now the New Universities are handing out qualifications that aren't worth the paper they are printed on. And we have legions of functionally illiterate 'graduates'.

Madness.

In America it looks a lot more sinister though, America truly feels like the agenda is to create a stupid populace so as they don't start asking difficult questions of the elites.


Thanks for the contribution! I had no idea this started in the UK. It doesn't surprise me. Its amazing how many "movements" or social engineering campaigns start in the UK and then are appropriated by the US intelligentsia.

It does look more sinister in the US and I don't really understand why except that the system seems so much more extreme. I've theorized its because, particularly in the US cities, the school districts have to deal with an incoming student population for which language is extremely dissimilar. So many of the kids come into the system either as non-English speakers or non-standard English speakers. Its difficult for the educators to find a baseline at which they can successfully begin while at the same time complying with the dictates of Political correctness. Its an awful situation.



posted on Sep, 6 2015 @ 11:45 AM
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Whatever happenned to leaving those who are too stupid to learn the native language behind? The Democrats and republicans keep spending money on education when its th eeducation itself that is th eproblem. A 5th grader in the 1800s books are the equal of college books these days in comparison. Its the sam eeverywhere. th e bigger a population gets the stupider their government wants them to be.



posted on Sep, 6 2015 @ 12:33 PM
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originally posted by: Painterz
It was in the UK at least when the government decided every child should go on to college and university (to keep them off the unemployment rolls and to start getting them in debt), and frankly every child could not hack that.

So rather than accept that not every child could hack it, they just dumbed down, and now the New Universities are handing out qualifications that aren't worth the paper they are printed on. And we have legions of functionally illiterate 'graduates'.

Madness.

In America it looks a lot more sinister though, America truly feels like the agenda is to create a stupid populace so as they don't start asking difficult questions of the elites.


In the UK, it was happening way before New Labour. It was happening in the 1970's as well. For the first three years of my primary school, we all had individual desks where we could keep our stuff, and all those desks faced the teacher, and our work was marked by the teacher. Then in the next three years, we all sat in little groups of six desks, face to face, three a side, so there were six groups of desks in the classroom. Teacher didn't mark our work, everyone had to mark each others work instead.

O-levels, A-levels, SYS years were all replaced with GCSE's. Grades weren't marked A to E, but 1 to 9. They actually split the high-school GCSE's up to Foundation, General and Credit levels, each a different difficulty level. So everyone would get an A.



posted on Sep, 6 2015 @ 12:39 PM
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Multiple choice was invented by the American army in the late thirties, by who escapes me, it should be on Google somewhere.



posted on Sep, 9 2015 @ 07:23 PM
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Ok, I watched the video. Originally I was going to just jump in and argue based on the context of others posts rather than viewing it, I kind of wish I had because the majority of those 12 minutes were wasted. But, it did give me the opportunity to take notes on each subject that was brought up as it was presented, so I guess that means I can write a better post.

The first thing they address is spelling. Languages that are in use evolve over time, not just in the meanings of words but in how they're spelled. The more used the language is, the more it evolves. Lets take English, go read some Shakespeare as it's originally written and you'll see it's quite different. Here's a small sample from Hamlet as originally written


Bar. VVHose there?
Fran. Nay answere me. Stand and vnfolde your selfe.
Bar. Long liue the King,
Fran. Barnardo.
Bar. Hee.
Fran. You come most carefully vpon your houre,
Bar. Tis now strooke twelfe, get thee to bed Francisco,
Fran. For this reliefe much thanks, tis bitter cold,
And I am sick at hart.
Bar. Haue you had quiet guard?
Fran. Not a mouse stirring.
Bar. Well, good night:
If you doe meete Horatio and Marcellus,
The riualls of my watch, bid them make hast.


We can go back even further than this and look at Beowulf. Wikipedia has an image of that in the original English.
en.wikipedia.org...#/media/File:Beowulf_Cotton_MS_Vitellius_A_XV_f._132r.jpg

That's spelling changes over time because of a language evolving. In many cases there's just as much an argument for saying luv is how the language wants to spell love today as there is for it being a misspelling and which is which merely depends on the context of why it was written that way. The majority of our personal writing these days is done in text message where we want to conserve characters, that's the language evolving to meet current needs.

On the subject of mental problems, the majority of adults in the US have undiagnosed mental illnesses, of one form or another. Not everyone has their lives controlled by those illnesses but they do exist. The schools are trying to be more proactive and catch these things early, so that when they're adults if it becomes an issue they can be appropriately treated. It's a step in fixing the horrible mental health system in the US.

On the "look see" teaching method, it has a very factual basis. Let me give you an example

i cdnuolt blveiee taht I cluod aulaclty uesdnatnrd waht I was rdanieg. The phaonmneal pweor of the hmuan mnid, aoccdrnig to a rscheearch at Cmabrigde Uinervtisy, it dseno’t mtaetr in waht oerdr the ltteres in a wrod are, the olny iproamtnt tihng is taht the frsit and lsat ltteer be in the rghi t pclae. The rset can be a taotl mses and you can sitll raed it whotuit a pboerlm. Tihs is bcuseae the huamn mnid deos not raed ervey lteter by istlef, but the wrod as a wlohe. Azanmig huh? yaeh and I awlyas tghuhot slpeling was ipmorantt! if you can raed tihs forwrad it.


Most people can read that with little to no effort. The way our brains process writing is that we look for spacers and break things into words. We don't however recognize words phonetically, we recognize groups of letters together regardless of their order. This also happens to be why homophones are so tricky for so many people, your, you're, and yore is a common example seen all the times on forums and it's because we recognize y, o, and r in all of them.

I stopped listening at the flouride and vacctionation conspiracy, I'm not even going to bother arguing it because it has nothing to do with education so I'll close with one more comment. If you want to talk about dumbing down, how about the subliminal messages in this video where they flash pictures of kids in chains, and viscious dogs for half a second to enforce the negative message that kids can't reason today, without ever adequately providing their own reasoning?



posted on Sep, 9 2015 @ 09:20 PM
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a reply to: Sovan

Boxx seth 2 U flour Sharon tsss inflowmation, eddyoukcion knowadaze jgibs mie the williez.

Az fore 1800s n earllee 1900s 5th gradez textrooks, buy 1 at yew lokel hueds boock stora and Czech ut da amazing (itself an amazing example of a tripped out word that stuck) lefle ov intertellaghent langwich stored within it.

The video lays out an interesting pattern of wrongheaded decisions. I'd bet that almost all the people involved in this wide-scale behavior modification thought they were doing well, and had solid reasons and research to back up what they thought or think is a fix to a problem. Rather than keeping the modification drugs flowing, children should be given less homework, longer vacations and more time to play in nature, the majority of them should be taken off off those counterproductive drugs and given a feel of what it's like to play ball in the park with the neighborhood kids, and parents really ought to consider teaching their children to read, write, and type very early, before starting kindergarten. And, yeah, teachers should at least give the children the commonly accepted spelling of a word or turn of speech and tell them how those words originated and who has used them well over the ages. But bottom line, as in The Graduate, I have only one word which sums up this unappetizing situation. Electrolytes.


edit on 9-9-2015 by Aleister because: (no reason given)

edit on 9-9-2015 by Aleister because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 9 2015 @ 10:17 PM
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a reply to: Aleister

Some people are poorly educated, no doubt. Louisiana has a 65% adult literacy rate. I've seen people graduated from HS without knowing how to write their own name so the state could keep it's funding. Last year I was taking a 3000 level writing course and befriended the professor. He said it was always a delight to read my papers because I was articulate and could argue my viewpoint. Towards the end of the semester he showed me some of the papers from others in the class, and I'll be honest, the D- grades he gave them were generous. These things weren't even at what I would call 6th grade book report level.

The average kid going into 3rd grade today had parents born in the mid 80's and went to colleges where they were never taught to write properly as they would have just graduated in the past decade, and these problems have persisted longer than that. If the home can't teach someone to write, and the school can't do it, then how can the person learn?

I remember growing up, I could never hit page requirements for papers. Today I can't shut up, at some point I learned to be verbose and I largely learned that off of community interactions like web forums. If you write a lot you eventually become OK at it.

With all the writing we do today, I'm actually rather optimistic people can learn to write well. We just need to teach them how to construct sentences, and let them write about what they find interesting. If you write 3 text messages a day for 10 years, you'll have written a larger body of work than Shakespeare did in his entire life.



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