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Debunking this photo and effectively throwing a "curve-ball" at the Globe Earth myth.

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posted on Sep, 6 2015 @ 12:07 AM
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a reply to: OccamsRazor04
the horizon is limited by your field of view.
An example




posted on Sep, 6 2015 @ 12:08 AM
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a reply to: occrest

Earth's radius is about 3.7 x that of the moon. With that in mind the picture looks pretty accurate to me.



posted on Sep, 6 2015 @ 12:08 AM
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originally posted by: occrest
a reply to: OccamsRazor04
the horizon is limited by your field of view.
An example



....

So then a telescope would allow you to see the sun at all times, why can't you?



posted on Sep, 6 2015 @ 12:11 AM
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a reply to: OccamsRazor04
And the Moon is not between the Sun and Earth in that shot so no shadow should even be expected.



posted on Sep, 6 2015 @ 12:12 AM
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a reply to: DenyObfuscation

According to his time zone the moon and sun appear to be the same distance from the Earth. How can the moon ever block out the sun in that scenario?



posted on Sep, 6 2015 @ 12:13 AM
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originally posted by: OccamsRazor04

originally posted by: occrest
a reply to: OccamsRazor04
the horizon is limited by your field of view.
An example



....

So then a telescope would allow you to see the sun at all times, why can't you?

Because it's a spotlight, obviously!



posted on Sep, 6 2015 @ 12:14 AM
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Can you show me, using a telescope, looking at China from California? Should be no problem with a flat Earth .. why can't we do it?



posted on Sep, 6 2015 @ 12:15 AM
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a reply to: DenyObfuscation

And why does the sunlight not shine on Earth, yet the Sun is powerful enough to shine light on planets further away?



posted on Sep, 6 2015 @ 12:17 AM
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i imagine if you were high enough, where the air was thinner and the atmosphere did not obscure your view, you probably could.



posted on Sep, 6 2015 @ 12:18 AM
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a reply to: occrest




i imagine if you were high enough, where the air was thinner and the atmosphere did not obscure your view, you probably could.

Not to mention that the horizon would be farther away because of the curve of the Earth, of course.



posted on Sep, 6 2015 @ 12:18 AM
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originally posted by: occrest
i imagine if you were high enough, where the air was thinner and the atmosphere did not obscure your view, you probably could.

No one could ever get that high without suffering from an overdose.



posted on Sep, 6 2015 @ 12:19 AM
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originally posted by: occrest
i imagine if you were high enough, where the air was thinner and the atmosphere did not obscure your view, you probably could.

So you have to be high to do it .. which is what you'd expect from a curved Earth. Thanks for proving my point. You do realize the atmosphere would STILL obscure the view right? Because you still have to look through it no matter how high you get.



posted on Sep, 6 2015 @ 12:20 AM
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a reply to: occrest

Please explain why, in your timezone scenario, the Sun can't be seen with a telescope 24 hours a day from all points on Earth.



posted on Sep, 6 2015 @ 12:23 AM
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Flat Earth Theory dictates that the sun must revolve around the Earth's flat disc and be a lot smaller and not as hot as we think.

Explain seasons. Explain why the Antarctic experiences months of light or darkness. Show me a model that explains this because if the sun revolves towards the outside to give the Arctic its winter then even Australia should experience no darkness in their summer. I've lived in southern AU and New Zealand in summer. It gets dark for a lot longer than my home country England in its summer.

The seasons and the length of day of night across the planeT at different times of the year can only be explained with a heliocentric model and a globe tilted on its axis.

It's the only argument Flat Earthers don't have an answer to. They can point to elevated horizons and ignore gravity and how it affects perceptions, they can dismiss every photo taken from space. They can accept telecommunication signals from satellites but dismiss their photos. But they can't argue the seasons and the length of day determined by lattidude.



posted on Sep, 6 2015 @ 12:24 AM
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a reply to: Logman



It's the only argument Flat Earthers don't have an answer to.

False.
There are many. Why is Polaris not visible from more than 1º below the equator, for example.
edit on 9/6/2015 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 6 2015 @ 12:25 AM
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This video of a rocket launch in the nevada desert which shows the moon over australia. You can clearly see the moon in this video.



posted on Sep, 6 2015 @ 12:25 AM
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a reply to: occrest



You can clearly see the moon in this video.

And....?
Australians can't see the Moon?

edit on 9/6/2015 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 6 2015 @ 12:28 AM
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a reply to: occrest

My question is why can't I get my telescope and see the Sun at night, since it's right above the Earth still?



posted on Sep, 6 2015 @ 12:28 AM
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a reply to: Logman




posted on Sep, 6 2015 @ 12:30 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: Logman



It's the only argument Flat Earthers don't have an answer to.

False.
There are many. Why is Polaris not visible from more than 1º below the equator, for example.

Add the altitude of Polaris matching your latitude and it screams sphere.



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