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PA Judge Who Sold Juveniles to Jails Gets 28 Years in Prison

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posted on Sep, 4 2015 @ 07:54 AM
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a reply to: olaru12
The Jewish sages believe there are people who have no souls. I'm beginning to think they may be right.




posted on Sep, 4 2015 @ 07:56 AM
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a reply to: olaru12

A judge in prison?

Bet we wont get past the first year.....


Hope he is good at holding his soap......



posted on Sep, 4 2015 @ 07:59 AM
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originally posted by: thedeadtruth
So one guy takes the fall. But I guarantee after serving only a fraction of the sentence. He will be out and walk into a prime position within that company.

Boys clubs always looks after their own.


HAHAHA

I doubt he will get out alive.

And if he does he wont we walking.....at least not without a lot of discomfort and I doubt he will ever sit right again



posted on Sep, 4 2015 @ 08:01 AM
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It is good to see that justice has been finally done in this sleazy case. Makes one wonder if 28 years is really enough?



posted on Sep, 4 2015 @ 08:03 AM
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originally posted by: Salander
It is good to see that justice has been finally done in this sleazy case. Makes one wonder if 28 years is really enough?


28 months or 28 years? Being a judge it may as well be a death sentence.

Even in protective custody he wont have a easy time. He will be magnetic for every shiv....



posted on Sep, 4 2015 @ 09:19 AM
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originally posted by: Dimithae
a reply to: olaru12

I totally agree with the sentence he got,but I have an issue. What about the company that was paying him? They knew they were doing wrong too. They should not just be fined for a huge sum,they too should have to face jail time as well.


Good News, and for the very first time* I will say this individual
has been legally found to be a POS*. Although I'm not a Texan,
the privatization of prisons for a corporate bottom line is why:
I'll believe corporations are people when Texas electrocutes one.

For the judge-no-more, I hope everyone inside knows who you
once were...everyone. "Revenge is mine" was probably Bible
doctoring to avert real justice against the Bible doctors



posted on Sep, 4 2015 @ 11:47 AM
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a reply to: olaru12

Possibly the best news I've heard all week.



posted on Sep, 4 2015 @ 12:00 PM
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a reply to: olaru12

Wait a sec.

Wasn't this the story line to a Law & Order: SVU episode?

www.imdb.com...



Over the course of a complex "sexting" case involving an abused teenage girl, the team encounters a corrupt family court judge who hands down unusually harsh sentences for borderline sexual offenses.



posted on Sep, 4 2015 @ 12:02 PM
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originally posted by: SlowNail
a reply to: olaru12

I believe a similar thing is happening across the UK, with the intention of putting as many children as possible into care, warranted or not. Lots of cash seems to change hands during these processes.


The history for what you're talking about goes back further than you may know. Many Western countries used to take children from single mothers as well as from poor families and minority families.

Canada has a horrific record of doing this to the First Nations. Australia did it on such a large scale to the Aboriginals that the situation is called "The Stolen Generations", which officially happened up until the 1970s. And the US has been doing this to the Native Tribes for just as long.

Here's an article about the situation for Native Americans just in the last several decades.
Native Americans Expose the Adoption Era and Repair Its Devastation

And here's just one example from the Catholic Church in Spain.
300,000 babies stolen from their parents - and sold for adoption: Haunting BBC documentary exposes 50-year scandal of baby trafficking by the Catholic church in Spain



posted on Sep, 4 2015 @ 12:03 PM
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a reply to: olaru12

While I'll admit that I'm pleased with his conviction, IMO he should have been given a much longer sentence. If for no other reason than to serve as an example to other judicial officials.

Hell, I would have sentenced him to something like 28 life sentences to be applied consecutively.

I'll just bet he destroyed more lives than that with his corrupt activities.



posted on Sep, 4 2015 @ 01:13 PM
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This is the dystopian future of America!

A brutal corporate oligarchy, serviced by law enforcement, paid by the taxpayers with no recourse for justice.

The constitution is a meaningless piece of paper; only profit for the elite has any legitimacy.

Yeah, lets elect a corporatist like Trump....that'll work!



posted on Sep, 4 2015 @ 03:28 PM
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So a judge who sell out kids gets 28 years. Finally!


Now how about a Secretary of State who sells out her country, what should she get?



posted on Sep, 4 2015 @ 03:37 PM
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originally posted by: olaru12
Judge Mark Ciavarella Jr. will not have to do any hard time! He will be sent to one of those candy ass prisons for low risk prisoners and eventually his sentence will be commuted by another corrupt judge.

Thes jails have vollyball courts, swimming pools and other summer camp styled facilities, like Club Fed.....


www.forbes.com...
www.cnn.com...



This should really have been investigated and stopped a whole lot sooner than it was. Hopefully, he'll get his ass kicked real bad before another corrupt, morally bankrupt judge comes along and commutes his sentence. Really, all that would take is one (criminally like-minded prisoner) who isn't a judge and who hates judges.



posted on Sep, 4 2015 @ 03:41 PM
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originally posted by: derfreebie

originally posted by: Dimithae
a reply to: olaru12

I totally agree with the sentence he got,but I have an issue. What about the company that was paying him? They knew they were doing wrong too. They should not just be fined for a huge sum,they too should have to face jail time as well.


Although I'm not a Texan,
the privatization of prisons for a corporate bottom line is why:
I'll believe corporations are people when Texas electrocutes one.



I'm very much anti-death penalty. I think it's hypocritical at best and barbaric... having said that, I may lean a little pro death penalty in this case. A very excellent point you make.



posted on Sep, 4 2015 @ 04:29 PM
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originally posted by: Realtruth
So a judge who sell out kids gets 28 years. Finally!

Now how about a Secretary of State who sells out her country, what should she get?


The same amount that a President should get for allowing the biggest terrorist attack in US history to happen on his watch. Or the same amount a Secretary of Defense should get for knowingly sending US troops into Iraq without proper equipment.



posted on Sep, 4 2015 @ 04:39 PM
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a reply to: olaru12

This twisted individual deserves no less than was sentenced, however I can't help imagine if there were some option to reduce his term (slightly, say 3-5 years) in exchange for incriminating those providing the bribe in the first place.

They are equally responsible for these crimes- and who says THIS judge was the only one accepting bribes?



posted on Sep, 4 2015 @ 04:52 PM
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Perhaps all Judges, police, politicians should pass a morality tests to check if they have a heart before achieving office.



posted on Sep, 4 2015 @ 05:03 PM
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This is one of those true monster cases. I'd put this up way higher a gang shooting or emotionaly charged murder. This is calculated slavery. This is up there with the doctor who diagnosed people with cancer they didnt have and giving them chemotherapy.

Real monsters.



posted on Sep, 4 2015 @ 06:06 PM
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a reply to: jellyrev

Yes real monsters exist (took me longer than most to learn that lesson).
edit on 4 9 2015 by glend because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 8 2015 @ 09:39 AM
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a reply to: crazyewok

He most like won't be put in to normal holding due to "risk of harm". After a while under this they'll move him to a different jail. Put him in the same holding pattern again cause of "risk of harm" and move him again.

Mark Arthur Ciavarella, Jr

Seems I'm right they keep moving him, and his last stop isn't hard times prison it's Federal Correctional Institution, Williamsburg min' level that houses old white collars. Think of it as a criminal retirement home.



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