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NASA Creates a Material that Can Heal Itself Within Seconds

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posted on Sep, 3 2015 @ 10:29 AM
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This is great news for those Space enthusiasts out there like me.........! This new technology will make Space exploration much easier. The dangers of meteoroids and other particles are documented and are a real danger to any Space exploration; especially any long term jaunts into the Cosmos.



In a study published in the American Chemical Society’s Macro Letters in July, a research team showed it had found a way to make a material that can quickly heal itself. According to New Scientist, the material is made up of three layers—two thin polymer walls with a liquid inside—which, when exposed to oxygen, will harden.
This means when either of the walls are punctured, the liquid will quickly fill up the gap. In a video released by the research team, the material can be seen actually fixing a hole made by a bullet in about a second.


Now we have 3-D printing which is useful for Space exploration in terms of food, habitat(s), and clothing, we have man-made breathable leaves for air, we have faster propulsion methods, we've found water elsewhere in our own solar system, habitable worlds, and now we have slef-healing material which will be useful for protecting people as we travel through Space. What's NASA waiting for? All of the pieces are there to get this Space exploration thing really going into the stratosphere and beyond! What says ATS?

qz.com...




posted on Sep, 3 2015 @ 10:37 AM
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Out of curiosity shouldn't this be in the Technology discussions. I realize NASA created it, but this has so many possible applications throughout. In war, a self repairing vehicle. Practically everything. A dam that could reseal itself? I'll have to check out your link for more information so I may edit my response. Amazing discovery.

EDIT: Ok I realize that the liquid creates only a thin layer of repair, nonetheless fascinating and perhaps one day it will be advance enough to repair deeper damage.
edit on 3-9-2015 by Tiamat384 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 3 2015 @ 10:38 AM
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a reply to: lostbook

I'm cynical about this with this technology it allows us to expand and if we come contact extraterrestrials how long will it takes before we enslave and exploit them? I mean we look what we did to the Native Americans, Africans, and other non Europeans.
edit on 3-9-2015 by starwarsisreal because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 3 2015 @ 10:40 AM
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a reply to: lostbook

except theres not much oxygen in space



posted on Sep, 3 2015 @ 10:41 AM
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I need some of this stuff to cure a hangover when I drink.

This may have positive implications for space exploration because as pressure goes out, the oxygen goes out and it can help to patch holes. Now weight is actually an important factor when sending something into space. I wonder what the weight of this is? It has to be shipped. There are a lot of small particles that could cause problems with the space station.



posted on Sep, 3 2015 @ 10:41 AM
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a reply to: starwarsisreal
Who's to say that WE exploit them? It could easily be the other way around.



posted on Sep, 3 2015 @ 10:41 AM
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a reply to: Ozsheeple

there is oxygen in the ship so a breach should seal.



posted on Sep, 3 2015 @ 10:41 AM
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a reply to: lostbook

I saw something not too long ago about some type of bio body armor for troops that can take damage and repair itself. Sounds like it could be based on the same technology. Neat article. Nice post



posted on Sep, 3 2015 @ 10:43 AM
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originally posted by: starwarsisreal
I'm cynical about this with this technology it allows us to expand and if we come contact extraterrestrials how long will it takes before we enslave and exploit them?


That is so far down on the list of concerns it probably should not even be on there to begin with.



posted on Sep, 3 2015 @ 10:52 AM
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a reply to: lostbook

Brilliant.

From the excerpt it seems like human skin could've been the inspiration. There are two layers of 'skin' and the 'liquid' could act as blood platelets that seal the wound.

Technology replicating biology, I love it.




edit on 3-9-2015 by Thecakeisalie because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 3 2015 @ 11:16 AM
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originally posted by: Thecakeisalie
a reply to: lostbook

Brilliant.

From the excerpt it seems like human skin could've been the inspiration. There are two layers of 'skin' and the 'liquid' could act as blood platelets that seal the wound.

Technology replicating biology, I love it.





Great point, didn't think of that until you brought it up. Reminds me when my kids tell me they're bleeding and I tell them no worries, it will heal.



posted on Sep, 3 2015 @ 11:22 AM
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a reply to: lostbook

So, NASA "Invents" the same material they've been using in bicycle tyres for years.....o.k not exactly the same thing but the idea was already out there.....



posted on Sep, 3 2015 @ 11:42 AM
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a reply to: lostbook

I see this being used for roads.

Potholes would become nonexistent.

EDIT: I would also like to add that NASA is a complete waste of money because all this video looks like now that I am thinking about it is they took two sheets of thin plastic and put some #ing super glue in the middle then shot it with a gun.


edit on 3-9-2015 by OrphanApology because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 3 2015 @ 01:42 PM
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a reply to: lostbook

I agree...get out there!

Oh wait...we haven't had Full Disclosure yet...smh.



posted on Sep, 3 2015 @ 01:45 PM
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Neat material, but can it heal itself under pressure? I mean if something rips a hole through a space suit or ship, won't it immediately decompress? Wouldn't they have to wait for almost complete decompression for this to work?



posted on Sep, 3 2015 @ 03:01 PM
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Why didn't I think of that, or any sci-fi writer, Gene Roddenberry, or Heinlein included. Nice find, and a nice invention. Hopefully it is tested to its extremes and works for even good-size holes. Cool! (or, in space, very very cold!).



posted on Sep, 3 2015 @ 03:06 PM
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Interesting timing. Two years ago when the Pentagon started talking about the requirements they were looking into for the sixth generation fighter, that will enter service closer to 2030, this was something that both Lockheed and Boeing mentioned.


Boeing and Lockheed Martin have both submitted proposals for consideration. Lockheed's conceptual suggestions include a higher top speed, greater range, improved stealth capabilities, and even a self-healing exterior. If, for example, the F/A-XX takes enemy fire, a two part epoxy-hardening agent putty would be automatically extruded to scab over the bullet holes and keep the aircraft airborne. Unlike the rubber bladder lined fuel tanks from WWII (the bladder would expand when the tank ruptured to plug the hole), this system would be similar to those developed at the University of Illinois' Autonomous Materials Systems Research Group which "bleed" liquid solvent into structural cracks or those from Department of Aerospace Engineering at the University of Bristol in England which instead uses composite-filled glass microtubules. All Lockheed needs to do now is invent such a system.

gizmodo.com...



posted on Sep, 3 2015 @ 03:17 PM
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originally posted by: Grimpachi
a reply to: Ozsheeple

there is oxygen in the ship so a breach should seal.


Cabin is pressurized more then likely just shoot the stuff out into space. Making globes of the stuff floating away. Great for here on earth but don't think it wound help in space. There is self repairing glass now that I can see as having a use. It doesn't require contact with air its a silicone adhesive. Imagine no more cracked screens of broken glass on a car.



posted on Sep, 3 2015 @ 04:02 PM
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I wonder if this material was some of the stuff found at the Roswell crash back in the 1940's and it took all these years for the experts on how to make this material.

Remember you could wad it up in a tight ball and when you open your hand it would spring back to a normal flat sheet, with no creases. My understanding is, it was fire proof as well. This material was very thin.



posted on Sep, 3 2015 @ 06:43 PM
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a reply to: lostbook

Is it possible for an object to "heal"?

But what an awesome discovery and infinite possibilities!




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