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Pre-Trial for Freddie Gray's Death Begins

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posted on Sep, 2 2015 @ 03:50 PM
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As most of you know the officers charged for Freddie Gray's death began today, I'm hoping to use this thread for pre-trial updates and then trial updates not protest coverage. To recap in case anyone doesn't know what this is all about...

On April 12, 2015 Freddie Gray was arrested for suspicion of carrying an illegal switchblade knife. He was placed in the back of a police transport van but not secured, during transport Freddie Gray incurred injuries to his spine, lapsed into a coma and died on April 21, 2015.

Six officers have been charged in the case:


Officer Caesar R. Goodson Jr.: The driver of the van.[24] He was charged with second-degree depraved heart murder; involuntary manslaughter; second-degree assault; manslaughter by vehicle (gross negligence); manslaughter by vehicle (criminal negligence); and misconduct in office.[67] He posted a US$350,000 bail.[26] The grand jury indicted Goodson on all charges and added an indictment of reckless endangerment.[12]

Officers Garrett E. Miller and Edward M. Nero: The officers that caught Gray after he fled, and, after apprehending him, handcuffed Gray with his arms behind his back.[24] Miller was charged with two counts of second degree assault; two counts of misconduct in office; and false imprisonment. Nero was charged with two counts of second degree assault; misconduct in office and false imprisonment.[67][69] Each posted a US$250,000 bail.[26] The false imprisonment charges were dropped by the grand jury, and added an indictment of reckless endangerment.[12]

Officer William G. Porter: Met up with the van after Goodson called dispatchers to ask for an officer to come check on Gray.[24] He was requested twice by Gray for a medic, but did not call for one.[70] He was charged with involuntary manslaughter; second degree assault; misconduct in office.[67] Porter posted a US$350,000 bail.[26] The grand jury indicted Porter on all charges and added an indictment of reckless endangerment.[12]

Lt. Brian W. Rice: The officer who initially made eye contact with Gray while on a bicycle patrol.[24] He was charged with involuntary manslaughter; two counts of second degree assault; manslaughter by vehicle (gross negligence); two counts of misconduct in office; and false imprisonment.[67] He posted a US$350,000 bail.[26] The false imprisonment charges were dropped by the grand jury, and added an indictment of reckless endangerment.[12]

Sgt. Alicia D. White: White is accused of not calling for medical assistance when she encountered Gray, "despite the fact she was advised that he needed a medic."[24][70] She was charged with involuntary manslaughter; second degree assault; and misconduct.[67] She posted a US$350,000 bail.[26] The grand jury indicted White on all charges and added an indictment of reckless endangerment.[12]


Wikipedia

9/2/15 Pre-Trial Day One:

Judge Rejects Dismissal of Charges Against Officers Charged in Freddie Gray Death


The charges against the six police officers linked to Freddie Gray's death will not be dismissed and State's Attorney Marilyn Mosby will not be recused from the case, a judge ruled today.

In a pre-trial hearing today at the Baltimore City Circuit Court, Judge Barry Williams denied the two defense motions. None of the six officers charged was present, only their lawyers.

Andrew Graham, who represented all six officers in the argument for dismissal of charges due to "prosecutorial misconduct," said that State's Attorney Marilyn Mosby, the chief prosecutor for Baltimore, "violated public conduct" and was "reckless" during her May 1 news conference about the arrests by implying guilt of the officers and discussing evidence. Mosby was present in court today but did not speak.




posted on Sep, 2 2015 @ 04:10 PM
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I'm wondering how they were all able to post bail at $200k+, that's some serious dough.

Edit - I'm glad the charges were not dismissed and hope to see this trial go through.
edit on 2-9-2015 by charolais because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 2 2015 @ 04:20 PM
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a reply to: charolais

I don't think you have to post the entire amount.



posted on Sep, 2 2015 @ 04:23 PM
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Those cops will never see justice or a day in jail. The police union lawyers will file appeal after appeal until they finally get a jury to set them loose.



posted on Sep, 2 2015 @ 04:26 PM
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No one should die for that

I hope those responsible will come to justice



posted on Sep, 2 2015 @ 09:58 PM
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originally posted by: ManBehindTheMask
No one should die for that

I hope those responsible will come to justice


Those responsible are already dead. He had a history of self abuse to get out of going to jail and instead be left at the hospital to get treatment. This time it just didn't go right for him. It's brutal, but it's more common than you think.



posted on Sep, 3 2015 @ 09:47 AM
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Well considering the prosecutorial misconduct and connections to others i suspect the case might eventually be dropped.



posted on Sep, 3 2015 @ 03:50 PM
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a reply to: yuppa

The judge dismissed those claims made by the defense.



posted on Sep, 3 2015 @ 04:04 PM
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If you fight the law, you're gonna have a bad time



posted on Sep, 3 2015 @ 07:11 PM
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a reply to: Shamalamadingdong

Fighting the law is not an excuse for officers to mete out their own punishment. We have due process or should we just toss that out the window?



posted on Nov, 30 2015 @ 08:41 AM
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Update

The first Freddie Gray trial gets underway in Baltimore


Officer William Porter is expected in Baltimore courtroom Monday to begin his trial for charges stemming from the arrest and death of 25-year-old Freddie Gray while in police custody.

Despite pleas from the defense to move the high-profile trial out of the city, the case will be heard in Baltimore, and Officer Porter's fate will be decided by residents of the city.

Porter is the first of six officers to be tried in Gray's case, and a judge has ordered a separate trial for each officer.

Seven months ago Officer Porter was charged with involuntary manslaughter, second-degree assault and misconduct in office. He has entered a plea of not guilty, as have all the other officers charged in the case.

The first few days of the trial will focus on selecting a jury. It's a task which could prove challenging in a city that has been rocked by the controversy surrounding Gray's death.


click link for remainder of article.

This officer will be taking the stand in his own defense.



posted on Dec, 2 2015 @ 12:55 PM
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Update

Freddie Gray trial: Prosecutors detail timeline


BALTIMORE (CNN) -

Prosecutors offered a detailed timeline Wednesday of Freddie Gray's long ride in a police van, telling a racially diverse jury that Officer William G. Porter Jr. was present five of the six times the van stopped en route to a West Baltimore police station.

Porter, 26, is accused of failing to summon medics when the injured prisoner asked for help. He also allegedly failed to secure the 25-year-old man properly in the back of the van.

"He had a duty to keep safe a person in police custody," said Chief Deputy State's Attorney Michael Schatzow. "Evidence will show this defendant criminally neglected his duty to keep Mr. Gray safe."

Schatzow told jurors they would hear police dispatch recordings and view the van, which has benches and five seat belts on each side.

"There was no reason not to put him in a seat belt unless you didn't care," Schatzow said.


click link for remainder of article...



posted on Dec, 3 2015 @ 07:48 PM
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a reply to: Xcathdra

Thanks for the updates, so much going on lately that it's drifted to the back of my mind.



posted on Dec, 8 2015 @ 12:56 PM
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Update

Freddie Gray complained of back injury one month before death, cop said


Freddie Gray, a 25-year-old black man who died April 19 of a spinal injury after being found unresponsive in a police van following his arrest, told a police officer a month earlier about a prior back injury -- evidence that was not disclosed to the defense team of one of the police officers charged in Gray’s death.

After learning of the discovery violation, attorneys representing Officer William Porter asked Judge Barry Williams during a Monday bench conference to dismiss the case, grant a mistrial and exclude testimony from the state’s medical experts. Williams denied the requests, but said the defense could use the document – which is under seal – any way it chooses. The conference occurred after the jury was dismissed for the day.

Porter, who is black, is the first of six Baltimore cops expected to go on trial for Gray’s death. Porter faces manslaughter, assault, reckless endangerment and misconduct-in-office charges.


Click link for remainder of article...

Can we say Brady violation... For those not familiar the prosecution is required to turn over all information to the defense (discovery phase). They cannot withhold any exculpatory evidence (evidence that can possibly clear a defendant). Doing so is a violation of due process.

Brady Disclosure (Brady vs. Maryland)

Brady disclosure consists of exculpatory or impeaching information and evidence that is material to the guilt or innocence or to the punishment of a defendant. The term comes from the U.S. Supreme Court case, Brady v. Maryland,[1] in which the Supreme Court ruled that suppression by the prosecution of evidence favorable to a defendant who has requested it violates due process. Following Brady, the prosecutor must disclose evidence or information that would prove the innocence of the defendant or would enable the defense to more effectively impeach the credibility of government witnesses. Evidence that would serve to reduce the defendant's sentence must also be disclosed by the prosecution.



Examples include the following.

* - The prosecutor must disclose an agreement not to prosecute a witness in exchange for the witness's testimony.[2]
* - The prosecutor must disclose leniency (or preferential treatment) agreements made with witnesses in exchange for testimony.[3]
* - The prosecutor must disclose exculpatory evidence known only to the police. That is, the prosecutor has a duty to reach out to the police and establish regular procedures by which the police must inform him of anything that tends to prove the innocence of the defendant.[4] However, the prosecutor is not obligated to personally review police files in search of exculpatory information when the defendant asks for it.[5]
* - The prosecutor must disclose arrest photographs of the defendant when those photos do not match the victim's description.[6]
* - Some state systems have expansively defined Brady material to include many other items, including for example any documents which might reflect negatively on a witness's credibility.[7]
* - Police officers who have been dishonest are sometimes referred to as "Brady cops." Because of the Brady ruling, prosecutors are required to notify defendants and their attorneys whenever a law enforcement official involved in their case has a sustained record for knowingly lying in an official capacity.[8]


edit on 8-12-2015 by Xcathdra because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 14 2015 @ 09:29 PM
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Update

Jury completes first day of deliberations in Baltimore cop's trial in Freddie Gray case


Jurors have completed their first day of deliberations Monday in the trial of Baltimore police officer William Porter, the first officer to face a jury decision in the death of Freddie Gray.

Prosecutors say Porter is partially responsible for the death because he didn't call for an ambulance when Gray indicated he needed medical aid and because he ignored a departmental policy requiring officers to buckle prisoners in seat belts. Porter told jurors he didn't call a medic because Gray didn't show signs of injury, pain or distress and said only "yes" when Porter offered to take him to the hospital.

Three black men, five black women, two white men and two white women make up the jury. Judge Barry G. Williams told jurors they could stay as late as they would like each day to deliberate.


click link for remainder of article...



posted on Dec, 15 2015 @ 03:47 PM
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a reply to: Xcathdra

What the prosecution claims doesn't necessarily mean it's factual. Their job is to get their client's trial dismissed or get him acquited.

Thanks for the updates to the thread. Much appreciated.

Apparently after 2 days of deliberation the jury is saying they are deadlocked. The judge ordered them to keep deliberating.



posted on Dec, 15 2015 @ 04:03 PM
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Looks like the prosecutions planned failure is getting realized.




posted on Dec, 15 2015 @ 07:50 PM
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a reply to: Kali74

Too late to edit. I hope it's obvious I meant the Defense lol.



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