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Did Tesla Discover Alien Life?

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posted on Sep, 2 2015 @ 01:43 PM
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originally posted by: alldaylong
a reply to: Sharted





Tesla apparently had spent a number of years trying to translate the mysterious signals he first heard in 1899. His basic interpretation of these signals was that creatures from another planet, "Martials" as the slang of the day called them


I would say Tesla had read H.G. Wells " The War Of The Worlds " published in 1898.

His imagination took over from there on.


Fair comment, but it still doesn't explain why the US government keeps these documents hidden. If they are nothing more than fiction and insane garbage what's to hide? It also doesn't explain his prediction of global warming over one hundred years prior to it becoming common knowledge.




posted on Sep, 2 2015 @ 01:54 PM
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originally posted by: 3danimator2014
You guys are like the North Koreans with heir Dear Leader.

Telsa worshipers are an interesting bunch.



posted on Sep, 2 2015 @ 02:09 PM
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a reply to: Sharted




It also doesn't explain his prediction of global warming


Swedish Scientist Svante Arrhenius predicted " Global Warming " in 1896.

www.lenntech.com...

Tesla was nothing more than a charlatan.




but it still doesn't explain why the US government keeps these documents hidden.


Maybe they wanted a good laugh but not share the humour with anyone outside government.



posted on Sep, 2 2015 @ 02:19 PM
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a reply to: Sharted

The citation you posted there has me thinking that Tesla reminds me a little of Paul Bennewitz. Have you ever heard his story?




posted on Sep, 2 2015 @ 02:38 PM
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originally posted by: MysterX
a reply to: Bedlam

But he did have wireless electricity transmission...decades before it was even considered possible.

I'm saying he was basically developing radar in all but name...his description of which is accurate...he says 'he has built devices that can detect approaching aircraft hundreds of miles away..all without the powerful amplifiers you mention...curiously this is one of the first instruments to detect a Pulsar, a military radar based in Alaska is thought to have detected the emissions from the first Pulsar 'officially detected' decades later...coincidentally enough.

While conventional radio transmission and reception relies on equipment you say wasn't around in Tesla's time, officially around at least, is accurate..Tesla's work was intimately associated with the Ionosphere. His focus was using it and the Globe in tandem to transmit energy.

Remember, Tesla himself claimed these signals were extremely weak and difficult to detect..Tesla may not have been directly receiving the signals, but detecting a secondary effect, a hiss, pop or whistle in the background..a barely noticeable drop in his transmission strength..or intermittent energy fluctuations in his equipment could have been what he was measuring.

If not bona fide 'radio signals' from a Pulsar themselves, but some secondary effect of them hurtling into the Ionosphere at the speed of light instead.

One thing we do know about Tesla, is that we know hardly anything about his work...again, governments don't franticly gut a man's apartment as soon as he dies without good reason. It's safe to assume much of Tesla's work was never revealed to the public for national security reasons, patents notwithstanding.


Tesla's wireless transmission experiments were merely inductive and fall-off in power terms therefore followed the inverse square law. His belief that it could be used for long range transmission was flawed. His attempts to do so caused damage to a nearby power station. The tower at Wardenclyffe never achieved any of its proposed aims (wireless transmission of electricity or radio transmission from New York to Paris).

In 1878, David E. Hughes used a spark gap to generate radio signals, achieving a detectable range of approximately 500 metres. In 1862 James Clerk Maxwell predicted and described mathematically the propagation of electromagnetic waves through a vacuum. Tesla did not commence his radio experimentation until after 1893.


edit on 2/9/2015 by chr0naut because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 2 2015 @ 03:05 PM
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originally posted by: chr0naut

originally posted by: MysterX
a reply to: Bedlam

But he did have wireless electricity transmission...decades before it was even considered possible.

I'm saying he was basically developing radar in all but name...his description of which is accurate...he says 'he has built devices that can detect approaching aircraft hundreds of miles away..all without the powerful amplifiers you mention...curiously this is one of the first instruments to detect a Pulsar, a military radar based in Alaska is thought to have detected the emissions from the first Pulsar 'officially detected' decades later...coincidentally enough.

While conventional radio transmission and reception relies on equipment you say wasn't around in Tesla's time, officially around at least, is accurate..Tesla's work was intimately associated with the Ionosphere. His focus was using it and the Globe in tandem to transmit energy.

Remember, Tesla himself claimed these signals were extremely weak and difficult to detect..Tesla may not have been directly receiving the signals, but detecting a secondary effect, a hiss, pop or whistle in the background..a barely noticeable drop in his transmission strength..or intermittent energy fluctuations in his equipment could have been what he was measuring.

If not bona fide 'radio signals' from a Pulsar themselves, but some secondary effect of them hurtling into the Ionosphere at the speed of light instead.

One thing we do know about Tesla, is that we know hardly anything about his work...again, governments don't franticly gut a man's apartment as soon as he dies without good reason. It's safe to assume much of Tesla's work was never revealed to the public for national security reasons, patents notwithstanding.


In 1878, David E. Hughes used a spark gap to generate radio signals, achieving a detectable range of approximately 500 metres. In 1862 James Clerk Maxwell predicted and described mathematically the propagation of electromagnetic waves through a vacuum. Tesla did not commence his radio experimentation until after 1893.




I quite like this.



Tesla came to the incorrect[60] conclusion that Maxwell, Lodge, and Hertz were wrong in their findings that airborne electromagnetic waves (radio waves) were being transmitted and instead attributed it to what he called “electrostatic thrusts”,[61] with the real signals being conducted by Earth currents.[62]


en.wikipedia.org...

I cannot understand why the idolising of Tesla. Albert Einstein kept three photographs in his study. The photographs where of British scientists and inventors, Sir Issac Newton, James Clerk Maxwell and Michael Faraday.

Einstein regarding those three as the greatest minds who had contributed to science. Tesla didn't get a look in.



posted on Sep, 2 2015 @ 03:08 PM
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originally posted by: Sharted

originally posted by: alldaylong
a reply to: Sharted





Tesla apparently had spent a number of years trying to translate the mysterious signals he first heard in 1899. His basic interpretation of these signals was that creatures from another planet, "Martials" as the slang of the day called them


I would say Tesla had read H.G. Wells " The War Of The Worlds " published in 1898.

His imagination took over from there on.


Fair comment, but it still doesn't explain why the US government keeps these documents hidden. If they are nothing more than fiction and insane garbage what's to hide? It also doesn't explain his prediction of global warming over one hundred years prior to it becoming common knowledge.


OK, famous electrical pioneer reads "The War of the Worlds" and starts talking about "Death Rays".

Government employees, worried about other nations, having also read the same novel, consider that perhaps Tesla might have invented some sort of directed energy weapon and takes the step of securing all documents that may (or may not) relate to weapons. Remeber also that Tesla claimed that his mechanical oscillator could demolish buildings and "crack the Earth in two".

The g-men took his stuff not because they knew something, but because they didn't actually know.



posted on Sep, 2 2015 @ 03:33 PM
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originally posted by: alldaylong

originally posted by: chr0naut

originally posted by: MysterX
a reply to: Bedlam

But he did have wireless electricity transmission...decades before it was even considered possible.

I'm saying he was basically developing radar in all but name...his description of which is accurate...he says 'he has built devices that can detect approaching aircraft hundreds of miles away..all without the powerful amplifiers you mention...curiously this is one of the first instruments to detect a Pulsar, a military radar based in Alaska is thought to have detected the emissions from the first Pulsar 'officially detected' decades later...coincidentally enough.

While conventional radio transmission and reception relies on equipment you say wasn't around in Tesla's time, officially around at least, is accurate..Tesla's work was intimately associated with the Ionosphere. His focus was using it and the Globe in tandem to transmit energy.

Remember, Tesla himself claimed these signals were extremely weak and difficult to detect..Tesla may not have been directly receiving the signals, but detecting a secondary effect, a hiss, pop or whistle in the background..a barely noticeable drop in his transmission strength..or intermittent energy fluctuations in his equipment could have been what he was measuring.

If not bona fide 'radio signals' from a Pulsar themselves, but some secondary effect of them hurtling into the Ionosphere at the speed of light instead.

One thing we do know about Tesla, is that we know hardly anything about his work...again, governments don't franticly gut a man's apartment as soon as he dies without good reason. It's safe to assume much of Tesla's work was never revealed to the public for national security reasons, patents notwithstanding.


In 1878, David E. Hughes used a spark gap to generate radio signals, achieving a detectable range of approximately 500 metres. In 1862 James Clerk Maxwell predicted and described mathematically the propagation of electromagnetic waves through a vacuum. Tesla did not commence his radio experimentation until after 1893.




I quite like this.



Tesla came to the incorrect[60] conclusion that Maxwell, Lodge, and Hertz were wrong in their findings that airborne electromagnetic waves (radio waves) were being transmitted and instead attributed it to what he called “electrostatic thrusts”,[61] with the real signals being conducted by Earth currents.[62]


en.wikipedia.org...

I cannot understand why the idolising of Tesla. Albert Einstein kept three photographs in his study. The photographs where of British scientists and inventors, Sir Issac Newton, James Clerk Maxwell and Michael Faraday.

Einstein regarding those three as the greatest minds who had contributed to science. Tesla didn't get a look in.


I think that the idolizing of Tesla has to do with the 'story like' and larger-than-life folk hero status, rather than science.

If you just take his mechanical oscillator as an example. He builds what was essentially a steam powered jackhammer. Runs it inside a hotel building. Gets complaints from the lodgers, who call the police. But Tesla's story is that he was forced to destroy the device to save the building from being demolished and than goes on to say that if he hadn't have stopped it, it could potentially have "cracked the Earth in two".

Just an irrational folk tale (for irrational folk).




posted on Sep, 2 2015 @ 03:40 PM
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And then, in 1938, over the radio, we get the Welles version of War of The Worlds.




Initially apologetic about the supposed panic his broadcast had caused (and privately fuming that newspaper reports of lawsuits were either greatly exaggerated or totally fabricated), Welles later embraced the story as part of his personal myth. "Houses were emptying, churches were filling up; from Nashville to Minneapolis there was wailing in the streets and the rending of garments," he told Peter Bogdanovich years later.

-Same link as above


I dunno; seems pertinent to me somehow.


edit on 2-9-2015 by Bybyots because: . : .



posted on Sep, 2 2015 @ 03:48 PM
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a reply to: Bybyots

I always find it ironic that a novel written by H.G. Wells had it's most famous moment by someone with the same surname although spelt slightly differently.



posted on Sep, 2 2015 @ 05:10 PM
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originally posted by: 3danimator2014


Eh?


Your post here -
www.abovetopsecret.com...

- accusing me of something I didn't do. Maybe next time pay attention to the post before attacking another poster. I pointed out 3 options that could explain what the OP was talking about. There is a huge difference in providing possible information and claiming that the information is 100% correct..

Hence the use of the word supposedly, used twice btw, in the very section you went off on me about.



posted on Sep, 2 2015 @ 07:22 PM
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originally posted by: Sharted
I didn't realize there was such animosity towards Tesla. I don't know much about him to be honest, but I do find it strange that the US government tried to confiscate every single note he ever wrote, allegedly because the Germans had previously stolen some of his work. Given that governments only confiscate data that has some importance I have to assume that Tesla had quite a lot of knowledge about topics of interest to powerful people.


It's not animosity, it's an unwillingness to attribute bogus facts to the man. There are a lot of Teslaphiles that would have you think the man was able to cure a rainy day.

The US government did go through his stuff, he was involved in some interesting things. But by far the bulk of his work was transferred to what is now the Tesla museum in Belgrade, well worth a visit if you get a chance.



Even today much of Tesla's work remains sealed, other than some lost documents that continue to surface, albeit briefly since the US government still tries to confiscate it. It is odd that documents of seemingly useless information are kept in such secrecy from the public.


They're kept in Belgrade. Although not very well, some of his materials have been damaged by poor handling.



I don't know what Tesla thought he heard or saw but I have read that he predicted the Earth would warm up, long before we knew of global warming. Perhaps he was a bit insane, but I can't help but quote: there's a fine line between genius and madness.


Sort of like Einstein, it's tough to pick out what he actually said and what woo sites SAY he said. But you have to remember the time he lived in, it's not likely he'd have understood the greenhouse effect applied to Earth. So you'd have to find what he DID say, if anything, and in what context. If he said 'Mankind's emission of CO2 will cause heat energy to be retained', that's one thing, if he said 'The Earth will become warmer because a giant wave of invisible particles is heating it", that's another.



Apparently in the lost journals book...


Unless you can establish the provenance of the "lost journals" and have picked through it with an eye for engineering anachronism and bogosity, I'd be calling them "fiction".



posted on Sep, 3 2015 @ 02:56 AM
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a reply to: Bedlam

Thank you Bedlam, I am learning a tremendous amount for free from your posts.

So, to state it loosely, Tesla was a drug addict that liked to write and would often become deeply bemused by the stuff his ultra-primitive radio equipment was picking up, thinking, for instance, that it was "messages from the planets", or what have you.

So that makes me curious because I found it easy to drift off in to a pleasurable dissociative state, sans drugs, as an adolescent by tuning my tiny portable AM/FM to strange freqs.

I have to ask: in your advanced state of radio-headiness? Do you ever encounter anything with your equipment that fascinates you but puts you in the same position as Tesla; without the greater magnitude of equipment that would allow you to make a concrete determination as to what you are receiving?

I'm a total cro-mag when it comes to radio stuff and I am just getting in to rtl-sdr, so you can imagine my dilemma.

Anyway, thanks again.




posted on Sep, 3 2015 @ 04:05 AM
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a reply to: Bybyots

There's a lot of stuff in my to-do pile that require equipment I will have trouble getting my paws on. Which usually means I have to pitch it to a MIC company and they get all the fun and most of the profits.

I have a lot of equipment for radio work at home or work or someone else's equipment (heh). But yeah I do like to try to identify the patterny crap I hear. Some of it is easy to identify, other bits you can speculate on. But I wouldn't be prone to calling it alien communication.



posted on Sep, 3 2015 @ 04:38 AM
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originally posted by: Xcathdra

originally posted by: 3danimator2014


Eh?


Your post here -
www.abovetopsecret.com...

- accusing me of something I didn't do. Maybe next time pay attention to the post before attacking another poster. I pointed out 3 options that could explain what the OP was talking about. There is a huge difference in providing possible information and claiming that the information is 100% correct..

Hence the use of the word supposedly, used twice btw, in the very section you went off on me about.


Im sorry, but you said it could be about the "black knight" satellite. WHich has been explained ad nauseium over the years. Am i missing somthing? My post was specifically about your black knight post. Maybe next time read what i write?



posted on Sep, 3 2015 @ 01:51 PM
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a reply to: Bedlam



But I wouldn't be prone to calling it alien communication.


No, neither would I.



But yeah I do like to try to identify the patterny crap I hear.


Yeah, so would I. What fascinates me about this stuff is that I think so would anybody. It seems that's what the brain wants to do: identify patterns. And when it can't, because it doesn't have the right equipment or knowledge, things get really interesting.

For instance. I think that it is strange that at roughly the same time that Tesla was tripping out on and waxing poetically about patterns he couldn't identify, he built that wireless boat that caused those that observed it in action to attempt to describe what they could not identify.



In 1898, Tesla demonstrated a radio-controlled boat—which he dubbed "teleautomaton"—to the public during an electrical exhibition at Madison Square Garden.

The crowd that witnessed the demonstration made outrageous claims about the workings of the boat, such as magic, telepathy, and being piloted by a trained monkey hidden inside.

Tesla


Reminds me of one of those Russian nesting dolls.


edit on 3-9-2015 by Bybyots because: . : .



posted on Sep, 3 2015 @ 05:55 PM
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a reply to: 3danimator2014

and once again learn what the word supposedly means.



posted on Sep, 3 2015 @ 11:10 PM
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After leading all the comments I'm thinking that Tesla wasn't as great as people make him out to be. Some even call him a cult. Now I don't want to bother reading the lost journals book



posted on Sep, 4 2015 @ 02:51 AM
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a reply to: Bedlam

Also, you helped greatly and participated in that James Tilly Matthews thread.

Doesn't this also make you think a little of Tausk's "Influencing Machine" that Kilgore Trout hipped us to?

It's like it's Bedlam 24/7 because everyone seems prone to some degree to some small sampling of what paranoid schizophrenics experience to a degree that is debilitating.

I'm sort of becoming convinced of this and am wondering mightily at what sort of paradigm shift (some psychological chiropractic adjustment) that it is going to take for mankind to hunker down, get honest, and deal with it.

Because folks that don't have our best interests in mind (MIC?) know this # (they learned it from the weather and radar) and don't give two #s who gets hurt while they develop the methods to deploy its power as a predictable process.

What do you think?

Busy signal?








posted on Sep, 4 2015 @ 03:14 AM
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a reply to: Bybyots

I'm not sure what's supposed to be like the airloom here. I don't agree that some external mechanism is causing schizophrenia.

If there are mini-schiz tendencies in people it's because it's a common failure mechanism. Namely, source tagging.




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