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Three Category 4 hurricanes have just hit the Pacific Ocean at the same time

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posted on Aug, 31 2015 @ 08:07 AM
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For the first time in recorded history, three Category 4 hurricanes have appeared in the Pacific Ocean at the same time, and they’re inching ever-closer to the Big Island of Hawaii. The never-before-seen meteorological event involves the hurricanes Kilo, Ignacio, and Jimena, the latter of which has sustained winds of up to 225 km/h.

According to the US Weather Channel, we haven’t seen anything close to this event before - three simultaneous Category 3 hurricanes have yet to be recorded. While the most immediate threat is to the coast of Hawaii, Japan, the Philippines, and Taiwan are also currently on watch.
Link to article


Any new "hope porn" threads? It isn't so bad that we need to bask in fantasy yet, is it?


For those that like their doom piled high, it just seems to be getting piled up. Kevin Blanch is reporting (video below) a nuclear meltdown which was caused supposedly as a result of the following:

Record-breaking typhoon to make direct hit on only nuclear plant restarted by Japan

I'm not claiming that Kevin Blanch is a totally reliable reporter but this is the best thing I can think of to fill this space. It points out that these hurricanes can potentially do real and lasting damage. Two nuclear meltdowns coming out of Japan would be unbelievably hard on the world.


www.youtube.com...




posted on Aug, 31 2015 @ 08:11 AM
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a reply to: Profusion

Your information about the three hurricanes is valid, NASA confirms it.

Damn. This is the second time in a few months, the last time was near the shore of China if I remember correctly.

S&F for the info.


edit on 31-8-2015 by swanne because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 31 2015 @ 08:12 AM
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a reply to: Profusion

Only one will cause some problems in the big Island but none of them are to impact the Island directly.

Still the closes to Japan is just no moving right now, But they are bringing needed humidity and possibility of rain in the west coat where is needed the most.



posted on Aug, 31 2015 @ 08:21 AM
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a reply to: Profusion

Luckily tropical storms that form off the coast of Mexico tend to die out before they hit Hawaii. There's a wind shear that exists south east of the Islands that rips hurricanes apart. It is unusual though for 3 category 4 storms (and a fourth forming) to exist all at once, I'm guessing it's because of the strong el Nino and the Pacific Blob. Due to location, there's no need for panic.



posted on Aug, 31 2015 @ 08:28 AM
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a reply to: Kali74

Interestingly the Caribbean is been weak this season on the type of hurricanes been formed, the dry conditions in the air is killing them off before they can become too strong.



posted on Aug, 31 2015 @ 08:31 AM
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a reply to: marg6043

Also a side effect of el Nino, especially a strong one.



posted on Aug, 31 2015 @ 08:36 AM
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a reply to: Kali74

Yes I agree, but for some reason I remember the last strong nino did the opposite in the Caribbean, bringing to much rain and flooding to southern states, we here in GA have been having a very wet summer.



posted on Aug, 31 2015 @ 08:48 AM
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a reply to: Profusion
a reply to: swanne

Wow, thank you! And that befor any major news outlet.



posted on Aug, 31 2015 @ 08:48 AM
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**DOUBLE POST**
edit on 31-8-2015 by PersonneX because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 31 2015 @ 08:49 AM
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a reply to: marg6043

The last moderate el Nino was 2009-2010. 2009 was a quiet Atlantic Hurricane season but 2010 was, according to wikipedia, the third most active on record. That el Nino lasted from January 2009 to January 2010 so while 2010 is labeled an el Nino year, by hurricane season it had been over by 9 months or so.



posted on Aug, 31 2015 @ 08:50 AM
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a reply to: Profusion

Wow! Seems like every time I turn around I read or hear the words... "record breaking" and or "historical".

Clicked on your link and first thing I read is "Today, history has been made."

This is not great news for Hawaii. I have a few friends living on the island..

From your link OP...


The hurricane is expected to pass north of Hawaii in the coming week, but forecasters warn that there is still uncertainty about the storm’s path.


Interesting times we are living in, for sure.



posted on Aug, 31 2015 @ 08:56 AM
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a reply to: Kali74

There's also a great warm water current a couple hundred miles off the islands that makes things interesting during hurricane season. I've seen several that were falling apart hit that current, shrink, get stronger than before, then turn and just miss.
edit on 8/31/2015 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)

edit on 8/31/2015 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 31 2015 @ 09:10 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Well hopefully, if they hit that, they turn and miss.



posted on Aug, 31 2015 @ 09:18 AM
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Yeah gotta batten down the hatches again the one last wk was long and I hated being a shut in but naaaw climate change ain't real.



posted on Aug, 31 2015 @ 10:53 AM
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Wow, that's insane looking. Something is definitely up with the climate and weather in general. July being the hottest month ever recorded and now this? Hopefully those in Hawaii are prepared because it might get pretty messy here soon.



posted on Aug, 31 2015 @ 01:11 PM
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a reply to: MamaJ

I got the feeling that the words has been chosen for maximum impact on peoples mind. Is a difference between "records" and "recorded History", actually 1936 was the worst dry hottest month in the US history in the month of July, but this year is not the hottest compare to 2012. But when the months of records are replace by weeks and days, they can claim more records braking.

Is a playing of words going on lately to emphasize weather.



posted on Aug, 31 2015 @ 01:15 PM
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a reply to: Kali74

They usually do because of that more or less permanent shear area. Makes for a high pucker factor until they turn though.



posted on Aug, 31 2015 @ 01:31 PM
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link to radar for pacific
www.accuweather.com...



posted on Aug, 31 2015 @ 01:37 PM
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a reply to: Kali74

During those years we experience floods here in my neck of the woods, to face a 3 year dry spell after that. Now is just raining most of the time, if we get any hurricane in the gulf we will definitely flood.

But so far is been mild hurricane season in the Caribbean.



posted on Aug, 31 2015 @ 03:20 PM
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Hilo is looking beautiful today, it's nice and breezy.



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