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Salt Lamp. Useful piece of tech for low cost light.

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posted on Aug, 29 2015 @ 02:40 PM
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Hi

I came across an article today discussing the uses of the salt lamp. I'm aware of a salt lamp which is a big crystal with a light stuck in it however this is literally a salt lamp. It operates by either putting a few teaspoons of salt into the lamp or sea water which brings light. This is achieved through the science used in galvanic battery cells which only limitation is the lifespan of the anodes.
I feel this has some massive benefits for those areas limited by lack of electricity. We take light 24hours a day for granted. However take away street lamps and house lighting and your possibilities have been reduced. So for those in need this is life changing.

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posted on Aug, 29 2015 @ 03:29 PM
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a reply to: liteonit6969

Nice! Really neat.

Now how do I build one?

Edit:

Never mind, I found how to build one: Salt Water and Aluminium Foil Light


edit on 29-8-2015 by swanne because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 29 2015 @ 03:38 PM
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a reply to: swanne

I knew that big bag of salt would come in handy. Just worried if their is an invasion of slugs.

Darkness vs slugs vs heart disease.

But honestly great bit of science and tech. I wonder if we could harness the power of the sea and light up the whole ocean. Now that would be a sight. The black Sea would be confusing...



posted on Aug, 29 2015 @ 04:08 PM
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a reply to: liteonit6969

Would you want a slug invasion in the dark? Exactly. All hail our slimey overlords.
edit on 29-8-2015 by GetHyped because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 29 2015 @ 05:09 PM
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a reply to: swanne

Hey!! Phage is on that page!!

My son and I like to do little experiments like this. Thanks OP, for giving us another project.



posted on Aug, 30 2015 @ 01:58 AM
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a reply to: liteonit6969

Great information thanks.

Can't help thinking about an old book I read years ago about the importance of the ancient salt lines. Apparently these were some of the first signs of human trading and from what I remember spread well over huge areas. The book perspective was from using salt for preserving food and flavouring food, but now I am wondering if we simply aren't rediscovering something the ancients knew and used that has been lost to us through the millennia.

The Bagdad batteries would indicate that they were aware of this type of technology and we have yet to find exactly how they lit deep dark places such as the pyramids when painting deep within them and other stone caverns not using some form of fire to provide light for their artists. (I always had trouble with the mirror idea which is great for one room but to reflect it down different levels, round corners etc etc puzzles me) but something one could carry and set up is quite another matter, who knows?



posted on Aug, 30 2015 @ 07:09 AM
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a reply to: DAVID64

Do not... ever... compare me to Phage.

I am waaay cooler.




 


But yeah, these kind of experiments are really easy to do, provided that you have the material of course. It gives us a new insight in practical science.



edit on 30-8-2015 by swanne because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 31 2015 @ 12:50 PM
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a reply to: liteonit6969

Well, a very slick website and apparently lots of awards, but very few facts.

It seems to be pretty disingenuous - it says it is "Sustainable and cost effective ecologically designed lamp powered by "tap water" and "table salt!", which if they've built one they will know isn't true. This device is a crude battery with an LED stuck to it. The battery is fuelled by whatever metal the anode is made from, which is likely to be zinc, magnesium or aluminium - they don't say.

Once this metal is used up, the battery is useless and will need replacing - it is not a rechargeable battery. They don't say how much it will be to replace the anode (or how much any of this costs), or where a remote islander will get a new anode from. Although they might have access to saltwater, I reckon they won't have their own metal smelting plants.... I also suspect charging your phone on this will run it down very quickly - again there are no real facts.

If you want something sustainable then a car battery with PV cells attached to it would be a better bet. For a small lamp why not use one of the many cheap and effective wind up lamps already on the market?
edit on 31/8/15 by FatherLukeDuke because: (no reason given)




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