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Earth's mineralogy unique in the cosmos

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posted on Aug, 29 2015 @ 09:11 AM
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New research predicts that Earth has more than 1,500 undiscovered minerals and that the exact mineral diversity of our planet is unique and could not be duplicated anywhere in the cosmos.


Apparently, WE ARE unique!


Hazen's team asked how the diversity and distribution of Earth's minerals came into existence and the likelihood that it could be replicated elsewhere. What they found is that if we could turn back the clock and "re-play" Earth's history, it is probable that many of the minerals formed and discovered in this alternate version of our planet would be different from those we know today.


Aside from the diversity our planet contains. I think the undiscovered estimate of 1,500 minerals is very exciting. We live in a day in age where almost anything can be "googled". To still be apart of a growing consciousnesses, where first time discoveries are still occurring is fantastic. This further proves that the world is very much undiscovered!


Link to page




posted on Aug, 29 2015 @ 09:14 AM
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a reply to: Triton1128

I have a theory that our world is unique, only for me the reason it is unique is because it is an anomaly due to paranormal activities happening across the world.
edit on 29-8-2015 by starwarsisreal because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 29 2015 @ 09:15 AM
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a reply to: Triton1128

Interesting!

The earth is like a fingerprint.

Unique, though there may be other living worlds out there.

It makes sense.

s&f



posted on Aug, 29 2015 @ 09:32 AM
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My estimate is there's infinite minerals undiscovered, we're not capable to drill a hole deep enough to the core itself.



posted on Aug, 29 2015 @ 09:35 AM
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originally posted by: Darkblade71
a reply to: Triton1128

Interesting!

The earth is like a fingerprint.

Unique, though there may be other living worlds out there.

It makes sense.

s&f


All planets are like a fingerprint. ALL of them are unique in their exact geological make-up. No two are going to be exactly alike. Earth is nothing special.



posted on Aug, 29 2015 @ 09:41 AM
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a reply to: Urantia1111


Earth is very special.

We are here, and that makes it so.
Although I get what you are saying.



posted on Aug, 29 2015 @ 09:48 AM
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a reply to: Triton1128

To be fair I imagine every planet is unique.
But cheers for the info.
We still have lots to learn.



posted on Aug, 29 2015 @ 10:00 AM
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a reply to: Triton1128

This rather seems to have been an exercise in stating the obvious.

However, it is doubtful whether it makes any vast difference to anything, since the probability every world in the cosmos is unique, and no two are likely to have the precise same distribution of materials present in their composition, does not actually reduce or increase the chances of finding life on other worlds.
edit on 29-8-2015 by TrueBrit because: Edited for clarity



posted on Aug, 29 2015 @ 10:06 AM
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Don't kill the messenger.

I'm just sharing an article "I found" to be interesting.





edit on 29-8-2015 by Triton1128 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 29 2015 @ 10:08 AM
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a reply to: Triton1128

To believe a planet is unique is wrong unless you know the entire universe and all the parallel universes too.



posted on Aug, 29 2015 @ 10:14 AM
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originally posted by: Trueman
a reply to: Triton1128

To believe a planet is unique is wrong unless you know the entire universe and all the parallel universes too.


That's "a personal opinion". Which is fine. But it does not belong on the same playing field as "the Carnegie Institution" specializing in mineralogy.

** to note: its posts like yours that cause this site to be filled with "assumptions". Have we actually proved "parallel universes exist yet?"

So your rebuttal is an assumption, based off an assumption. Its absurd.


edit on 29-8-2015 by Triton1128 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 29 2015 @ 10:15 AM
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I think the point of the article was that the bio-diversity on the planet creates it's own minerals.
Something so far, we have not found anywhere else that we have looked.

I get what was meant.



posted on Aug, 29 2015 @ 10:15 AM
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it might be unique, always seemed a bit 'off' to me for some reason



posted on Aug, 29 2015 @ 10:17 AM
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a reply to: Darkblade71

Its getting harder and harder these days just to post an interesting read. You get persecuted as if you're the author!



posted on Aug, 29 2015 @ 10:18 AM
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originally posted by: TrueBrit
a reply to: Triton1128

This rather seems to have been an exercise in stating the obvious.

However, it is doubtful whether it makes any vast difference to anything, since the probability every world in the cosmos is unique, and no two are likely to have the precise same distribution of materials present in their composition, does not actually reduce or increase the chances of finding life on other worlds.

^ ^ what he said. It's like what your mother used to tell you: "you are special, like everyone else."

There's got to be billions upon billions of planets out there, and many are bound to be very similar to Earth. It's just the simple fact of probability.

What this research show us, I belive, is that the universe has a very wide and all-encompassing "pallette" to work with, and many planets end up being very different, while many others end up being similar.

In any case, when it comes to life originating on a planet, I don't think it has as much to do with the mineral composition as with the availability of hydrocarbons and amino acids, coupled with sufficient gravity and global magnetic field to allow liquid water on the surface.



posted on Aug, 29 2015 @ 10:21 AM
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a reply to: wildespace

I agree with you fully.

Unfortunately, we can only work with what we have. Until we discover a 2nd Earth. Our home is the only laboratory we have to experiment with.

I think many are over looking the point of the article and expecting it to be something more grandiose then what it is.



posted on Aug, 29 2015 @ 10:46 AM
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originally posted by: Triton1128
a reply to: wildespace

I agree with you fully.

Unfortunately, we can only work with what we have. Until we discover a 2nd Earth. Our home is the only laboratory we have to experiment with.

I think many are over looking the point of the article and expecting it to be something more grandiose then what it is.

I saw your reply when I was just going to remark on the title of this thread: "Earth's mineralogy unique in the cosmos" with the fact that we have only studied mineralogy in the Solar System. We have no means to study the mineralogy of exo-planets. And even if we could, the number of exo-planets we have detected are a tiny drop in the ocean of all other planets out there.

I have respect and approval for such theoretical and experimental endeavours like this one, but our knowledge is so limited that we cannot hinge our world view on the limited sample that we've been able to work with.



posted on Aug, 29 2015 @ 10:55 AM
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My Opinion is that we as a species are Unique, but that their are many earth like planets. Im wondering how anyone could know the amount of undiscovered minerals, If they are in fact Undiscovered. No one knows just what is out in the vast expanse of the Universe. We can guess, and put instruments in space to determine certain minerals, but If another mineral exist and that Instrument isnt calibrated to look for that mineral, then we wont see it. Until humans actually leave the solar system and go for themselves to determine what is out there. Then we will only know what we know. If that makes any sense. If you dont know what to look for, then how can anyone determine what is truly out in the universe. Earths minerals Unique, doubtful.



posted on Aug, 29 2015 @ 12:13 PM
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a reply to: Glassbender777

we dont know much about this planet's "composition" and sure as heck have almost no clue what makes up our neighboring planets, sure Mars might have lots of physical similarities to Earth but the atmostphere and environment might be significantly different for the beings and creatures that live on and in them just like here



posted on Aug, 29 2015 @ 12:44 PM
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Fascinating article, thanks for posting.
I had no idea that biological processes were so linked to mineral creation.
a reply to: Triton1128





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